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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A literature review of pregnancy prevention programs: Implications for family life education program development

Reilly, Rosemary C. January 1994 (has links)
No description available.
2

DEVELOPMENT OF A FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION PROGRAM OF BEST PRACTICES FOR ADOLESCENT PREGNANCY PREVENTION

Townsend, Christy Marie 04 December 2003 (has links)
No description available.
3

A third alternative : to make abortion rare

31 July 2012 (has links)
M.A. / This dissertation evaluates the concept of a third alternative surrounding abortion which focuses on making abortion rare by addressing contemporary arguments. This third alternative recognises abortion as morally problematic but contends that it should be both legal and rare. Its aim is to address the overly narrow focus of the usual debate on either just the foetus or just the maternal body. In doing this it evaluates some of the current contemporary arguments surrounding abortion to show how these arguments are simply not enough. This includes questioning the social and political dimensions of the dilemma of abortion, and in particular, questions about the conditions that should be in place that will help make abortion rare. This should show how the current debate has created a clear division which has done very little to help women who are considering an abortion. Therefore the argument of making abortion rare should be supported by both Pro-Life and Pro-Choice arguments because if abortion became rare, it would mean that not only would there be fewer abortions, which is exactly what Pro-Life is arguing for, but it would also mean that women would be given more options, which is what Pro-Choice is arguing for.
4

Teenage pregnancy among high school girls in Mthatha, South Africa

Meel, A January 2011 (has links)
Teenage pregnancy is an important health and social problem in South Africa. Despite declining trends of fertility rates in last two decades, the pregnancy among school girls remains steadily high in South Africa. Teenage pregnancy had negative impacts on various aspects of socio-economic well being of school girls. Aim: To determine the proportion of teenage pregnancy among high school girls and to identify the possible factors that influence teenage pregnancy in Mthatha region during the year 2009. Materials & Methods: This is an observational cross sectional, analytic study of teenage pregnancy conducted among high school teenage girls in the Mthatha region of South Africa. Result: A total of 1150 teenage girls from 15 to 19 years of ages responded from seven high schools in the Mthatha region of South Africa. In total 113 (10%) of teenage high school girls were currently mothers or had previously been pregnant. The proportions of those who had ever been pregnant increased significantly with age. The risk of falling pregnant among public high school teenage girls had two times higher compared to private high school teenage girls. Condoms were the most common method of contraception whereas the oral pills were the least common in practice. About half of teenage girls who had ever been pregnant had an abortion and of this one-third had had a backstreet/illegal abortion. The frequency of substance use was significantly higher among teenage girls who had ever been pregnant. A significant correlation was found between low socio-economic status, public schools and teenage pregnancy in this study. Conclusion: Teenage pregnancy is common among high school girls from 15 to 19 years of age in the Mthatha Region, South Africa. Poor socio-economic family conditions, lack of contraceptive use, early sexual maturation, risky behaviour, lack of knowledge about sexuality and reproductive health, multiple sexual partners and substance use were the common contributing factors of teenage pregnancy.
5

Voices of the village : teenage pregnancy prevention for African American girls

Lewis, Timberly Rena 26 July 2011 (has links)
With increasing teenage pregnancy rates among Blacks in the United States and the negative impact on families, it is important that practitioners and communities acknowledge the changes in society. According to the research, the influence of the media, entertainment industry and technology weigh heavily on the behavior and interactions of teens. Building on Erikson’s Theory of Identity Development, sexual scripts which are drawn from hip-hop culture are utilized as points of entrance and tools for reeducating Black adolescents and preventing teenage pregnancy. Finally, intervention and prevention strategies that educate teenage girls around sexual scripts and utilize personal narratives are essential to reducing teen pregnancy are presented. / text
6

Knowledge and utililization of contraception amongst teenagers attending an urban Indian general practice.

Jugnundan, Prakash. January 1991 (has links)
During the six month period June to December 1990, 300 Indian teenagers attending the urban general practice of the researcher were interviewed. Data pertaining to age, sex, knowledge and utilization of contraceptives were recorded. The results showed that the majority of teenagers (57%) had a good knowledge of contraceptives. Utilization, however remained low. Most (56%) knew where their local Family Planning Clinic was, but only a small percentage (15%) attended. Recommendations directed towards implementing increased utilization of various contraceptive methods and decreasing teenage pregnancies are submitted. / Thesis (M.Med.)-University of Natal, Durban, 1991.
7

School Administrator and Staff Member Perceptions of a Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Program

McConnell-Smith, Sharon Lacretia 01 January 2015 (has links)
Mississippi is among the states with the highest teenage pregnancy rates, and the study site is among the high schools with the highest teenage pregnancy rates in the state. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to identify successful practices and areas for improvement in the implementation of a teenage pregnancy prevention program (TPPP) at the study site based on the perspectives of school administrators and staff members. Bandura's social cognitive theory provided a conceptual framework for considering behaviors and the social contexts in which they occur. Twelve participants were interviewed, including 3 administrators and 9 staff members. Data were analyzed using open coding to identify themes. Findings indicated that, according to the perspectives of the 12 participants, the evidence-based TPPP positively influenced the students by providing a structured curriculum for classroom teaching; promoting small-group discussions; and implementing an abstinence approach to prevent teenage pregnancy, HIV, and STDs. Strengths identified included the use of various instructional techniques and a general support for communication. Areas for improvement included scheduling, school staff and parent buy-in, and knowledge about specific problems related to risk-taking behaviors. Social change implications of this study include increased awareness among adult stakeholders of practices that support successful implementation of a TPPP and enhanced ability to make positive decisions about sexual behaviors among students. School officials could apply the findings to strengthening the effectiveness of the school's TPPP. Students may benefit from improved TPPP instruction by being better prepared to prevent teenage pregnancy, HIV, and STDs.
8

The Effectiveness of an Infant Simulator as a Deterrent to Teen Pregnancy Among Middle School Students

Hillman, Carol Best 08 1900 (has links)
This research was one of the first longitudinal studies to determine the effectiveness of a computerized infant simulator as a deterrent to adolescent pregnancy. All of the female eighth-grade students (221) in 1994-1995 and 1995-1996 from a suburban North Texas middle school were part of this study. They were tracked from the eighth grade through high school graduation to determine whether and when pregnancies occurred. The Kaplan-Meier procedure for survival analysis was used to determine test statistics. Survival functions and hazard functions were created for each independent variable--parenting the infant simulator, ethnic and racial, involvement in co-curricular activities, and crime. Results showed the computerized infant simulator to be highly effective in postponing the on-set of pregnancies for those students who participated in the parenting simulation. Hazards peaked at 3 years, 2 months for the experimental group and at 2 years, 21/2 months for the control group. Summertime and holiday seasons marked times of the year when the majority of pregnancies occurred. Caucasians peaked before the Other ethnic group. No significant differences were detected in regard to involvement in co-curricular activities, and no involvement in crime was self-reported. The model was developed to use as a guideline for implementing a pregnancy prevention unit in schools. This model could be used by Family and Consumer Sciences classes, teen pregnancy prevention programs, childbirth preparation classes, at-risk student programs, substance abuse intervention programs, and religious education classes.
9

Indigenous methods used to prevent teenage pregnancy : perspectives of traditional healers and traditional leaders.

Shange, Thembelihle. 25 November 2013 (has links)
The study aimed to explore indigenous methods used to prevent teenage pregnancy from the perspective of traditional healers and traditional leaders. Furthermore, it aimed to explore with traditional healers and traditional leaders whether these methods have relevance today as form part of teenage pregnancy intervention. The data were collected through conducting semistructured interviews with ten traditional healers and five traditional leaders from the rural area of Umhlathuzane, Eshowe. The interviews were guided by an interview schedule which allowed the researcher to keep in touch with the purpose of the study while having face to face conversation with participants. All interviews were tape recorded and transcribed. The findings of the study revealed that traditional healers and traditional leaders are concerned by high rate of teenage pregnancy within the community. They felt strongly that ignoring indigenous cultural practices due to modernity has led to major non-resolvable social issues such as teenage pregnancy, spread of HIV/AIDS related diseases, poverty, drugs and alcohol misuse. The study findings also revealed that there is a high demand for re-instituting elders' and family roles in addressing the erosion of cultural practices and traditional methods. Traditional practices such as virginity testing, ukusoma (non-penetrative thigh sex), ukushikila (physical maturity examination) as well as traditional ceremonies were identified as indigenous methods previously used to groom girls and to prevent teenage pregnancy. Furthermore, traditional healers and traditional leader were totally against contemporary teenage pregnancy interventions and policies around this issue, and have mixed views towards the idea of combining modern and traditional methods for teenage pregnancy prevention. Based on the findings of the study, recommendations were made regard to collaboration between South African government and indigenous experts so that to deal effectively with teenage pregnancy. Recommendations for further research were also made. / Thesis (M.A.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2012.
10

A community drama project to prevent teenage pregnancy

Nel, Johanna 13 May 2014 (has links)
M.A. (Psychology) / Teenage pregnancies should be understood in terms of a changing of sexual behaviour, slowly evolving over many centuries. In contrast to our modern world, New England puritans in the seventeenth century demanded that the entire community conform to the exemplary moral codes drawn up by the first settlers. Civil magistrates or ministers were responsible for quickly and publicly chastised sexual offenders. One of the sources estimate that in the late 1670's well over one half of the guilty couples involved in premarital pregnancies found themselves convicted and punished. In England the loosening of the popular convention about sexual behaviour was followed by the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 as secularism replaced Puritanism. Observers noted steady but noticeable erosion of church and civil opposition to premarital sexual activity. In Essex County, the number of civil prosecutions dropped and the penalty ranged from corporal punishment to paying a fine. In Middlesex county, Massachusetts, signs of moral irresponsibility in fornication cases increased, starting in the 1660's (Vinovskis, 1988). When prominent church leaders such as Jonathan Edwards in the eighteenth century tried to punish the lax moral standards of their parishioners, they found they could no longer count on the support of their congregations and the rest of the community. Simultaneously with the unwillingness of the civil or church authorities to punish cases of pregnancies, parents gradually lost their ability to persuade their children to marry according to their parent's wishes. In the absence of concerted communal or familial efforts to curb the problem of teenage pregnancy, a general loosening of sexual behaviour occurred among early Americans. Sexual intimacy returned as a normal part of courtship behaviour and practices such as bundling became more common. The promise to marry rather than the marriage itself often led to sexual intercourse amongst couples. As long as the community was not burdened with the financial burden of illegitimate children, citizens tolerated premarital pregnancies. The result was not a breakdown of social mores in the early Republic but a shift in the definition of appropriate behaviour between individuals in love. Shorter (in Vinovskis, 1988) concludes that central in the history of courtship over the past two centuries had been the enormous increase in sexual activity before marriage. Before 1800 it was unlikely that the typical young woman, would have coitus with her partner and certainly not before an engagement had been sealed, and probably not as a fiancee either. After 1800 however the percentage of young women who slept with their boyfriends or fiancees rose steadily. Today it is a common phenomenon.

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