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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Effect of incorporating encapsulated and non-encapsulated probiotic cultures on culture survival and cheese quality of gouda cheese

Liu, Yi-Chun 02 April 2012 (has links)
Gouda is a semi-hard, high fat cheese and was investigated here as a food vehicle for probiotic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to incorporate non-microencapsulated and microencapsulated probiotic cultures (L. helveticus and B. longum) into Gouda cheese. Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were used as starter cultures. Each batch was evaluated for its chemical, microbial, textural, and also sensorial properties after 3 and 4 months of aging. The experimental Gouda cheeses with the addition of probiotic cultures did not alter the chemical properties of the aged cheese. Furthermore, the final levels of both probiotic strains incorporated were meeting the recommendation level suggested by health organizations which is higher than 107 cfu/g. Moreover, the addition of probiotic strains and maturation time did not alter the texture of the cheese. Overall, the result from the sensory test also did not show any differences.
2

Effect of incorporating encapsulated and non-encapsulated probiotic cultures on culture survival and cheese quality of gouda cheese

Liu, Yi-Chun 02 April 2012 (has links)
Gouda is a semi-hard, high fat cheese and was investigated here as a food vehicle for probiotic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to incorporate non-microencapsulated and microencapsulated probiotic cultures (L. helveticus and B. longum) into Gouda cheese. Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were used as starter cultures. Each batch was evaluated for its chemical, microbial, textural, and also sensorial properties after 3 and 4 months of aging. The experimental Gouda cheeses with the addition of probiotic cultures did not alter the chemical properties of the aged cheese. Furthermore, the final levels of both probiotic strains incorporated were meeting the recommendation level suggested by health organizations which is higher than 107 cfu/g. Moreover, the addition of probiotic strains and maturation time did not alter the texture of the cheese. Overall, the result from the sensory test also did not show any differences.
3

INVESTIGATING THE THERAPEUTIC POTENTIAL OF MICROBIAL ECOSYSTEM THERAPEUTIC-1 ON ACUTE DSS-INDUCED COLITIS IN MICE

Munoz, Sean 03 October 2013 (has links)
Thesis (Master, Microbiology & Immunology) -- Queen's University, 2013-10-03 15:17:19.167
4

Evaluation of potential probionts for use in penaeid shrimp larval culture

Rodriguez Sala, Bruno Gomez Gil January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
5

Effects of Probiotic Administration During Coccidiosis Vaccination on Performance and Lesion Development in Broilers

Klein, Anthony 2009 August 1900 (has links)
The principal objective of this investigation was to evaluate coccidiosis vaccination, with or without probiotic administration, for effects on broiler performance and clinical indices of infection due to field strain Eimeria challenge during pen trials of commercially applicable durations. During trials 1 and 2, body weights of vaccinated broilers were reduced (P<0.05) compared to other experimental groups during rearing through the grower phase. Final body weights, however, were not different among experimental groups at the termination of each trial. Similarly, feed conversion in trials 1 and 2 was increased (P<0.05) in vaccinated broilers during rearing through the grower phase when compared to non-vaccinated broilers. Significant improvements (P<0.05) in feed conversion were measured in trials 1 and 2 in vaccinated broilers during the withdrawal phase of grow-out. Probiotic administration significantly reduced (P<0.05) feed conversion during the withdrawal phase of trial 2. During trial 3, body weights of broilers in the vaccine with probiotic (water) group were higher (P<0.05) at termination (d 44) than all other experimental groups and equivalent to the ionophore alone and ionophore with probiotic groups. Similarly, cumulative mortality corrected feed conversion ratio (FCR) was lower (P<0.05) in broilers from the vaccine with probiotic (water) group compared to negative controls, and not different from FCR in ionophore administered broilers. Trial 2 observations revealed body weight gains among vaccinated broilers that were significantly increased (P<0.05) during a seven day clinical field strain Eimeria challenge period compared to non-vaccinated broilers. Both probiotic and vaccine significantly decreased (P<0.05) gross lesion scores in upper and mid-intestinal regions. A significant reduction (P<0.05) in gross lower intestinal lesion score was also observed in the vaccine alone group. In Trial 3 general observations showed, broilers in the ionophore alone group were associated with higher (P<0.05) microscopic mid and lower intestine lesion scores when compared to broilers receiving vaccine or vaccine + probiotic. These data suggest that co-administration of probiotic during coccidiosis vaccination results in performance parameters that are improved when compared to vaccination alone and indistinguishable from protection conferred by feeding an ionophore in the presence of field strain Eimeria.
6

<i>Lactobacillus plantarum</i> CONDITIONED MEDIA REDUCES THE SEVERITY OF COLITIS AND INDUCES A SHIFT IN MACROPHAGE PHENOTYPE

TAYLOR, MICHELLE MARIE 29 September 2011 (has links)
Lactobacillus plantarum is known to reduce the inflammatory response of macrophages in vitro and decrease inflammation in vivo during colitis. A predominance of M2, anti-inflammatory, macrophages correlates with a reduced severity of colitis. The purpose of this study was to determine if L. plantarum-conditioned media is able to produce an anti-inflammatory macrophage response during Salmonella-induced colitis while also reducing inflammation. Female C57BL/6 mice were infected with Salmonella after streptomycin pretreatment, then gavaged with L. plantarum-conditioned media (or a control) four hours prior to infection and twenty-four hours post-infection, they were sacrificed forty-eight hours post-infection. Samples of the intestines, blood, peritoneal exudate macrophages, spleen derived macrophages, and bone marrow-derived macrophages were collected. L. plantarum-conditioned media was found to limit inflammation in a dose related manner. Inflammation was measured by cecum histology, myeloperoxidase activity in the intestine, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the blood. IκB-α levels in the intestinal epithelium were measured by Western blot and degradation was reduced by L. plantarum-conditioned media treatment of Salmonella infected mice. Macrophages from L. plantarum-conditioned media treated Salmonella infected mice were found to have an M2 phenotype that was not found in any other treatment group. The phenotype markers arginase-1 and Ym-1 were found to be elevated in L. plantarum-conditioned media treated Salmonella infected mice by Western blot, while Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-1 was reduced. Flow cytometry for the M2 markers CD206 and CD14 along with the M1 markers CD16 and CCR7 showed a similar M2 phenotype shift of macrophages from L. plantarum-conditioned media treated Salmonella infected mice. The cytokine profile of macrophages from L. plantarum-conditioned media treated Salmonella infected mice was anti-inflammatory with elevated IL-10 and decreased IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α supporting the M2 phenotype. The protective effects of L. plantarum-conditioned media were found to be at least partially macrophage dependent in a macrophage transfer experiment. In vitro, L. plantarum-conditioned media was also found to produce M2 phenotype macrophages but have no effect on phagocytic or bactericidal function. In conclusion, L. plantarum-conditioned media provides a novel means of producing an anti-inflammatory immune response during Salmonella infection without compromising the host’s ability to combat infection. / Thesis (Master, Microbiology & Immunology) -- Queen's University, 2011-09-29 10:07:20.666
7

Immunomodulatory Effects of Probiotic and Anticoccidial Treatments in Broiler Chickens

Stringfellow, Kendre 2012 August 1900 (has links)
Four experiments evaluated the impact of probiotic administration on the immune response of broilers vaccinated with a live coccidiosis vaccine. Experiment one showed that probiotic administration increased heterophil and monocyte oxidative burst, and lymphocyte proliferation at multiple time points. In experiment two, probiotic + vaccine increased heterophil and monocyte oxidative burst on d 15 when compared with the negative controls. Overall, vaccine administration alone showed the highest response when compared to all other treatments. In the second trial, all birds were exposed to Eimeria oocysts in the litter and oral gavaged. The results showed that probiotic + vaccine resulted in greater heterophil and monocyte oxidative burst levels on d 14 and 28 when compared to the negative controls. Increases in lymphocyte proliferation were also seen in the probiotic + vaccine and probiotic alone broilers on d 14 among other treatments. In experiment three, heterophil oxidative burst was increased (p <= 0.05) in the vaccine alone group, vaccine with probiotic group, and the ionophore with probiotic group, when compared to the negative control. Monocyte oxidative burst was increased (p <= 0.05) in the vaccine with probiotic group on d 36 and 43, compared to the negative control. Lymphocyte proliferation was greater (p <= 0.05) on d 22 and 36 in the ionophore with probiotic group, when compared to the negative control. Experiment four showed that liver AVBD 2 gene expression elevated (p <= 0.05) in the probiotic + vaccine group relative to the probiotic alone group. Ileum AVBD 2 gene expression was not affected among any of the treatments was evaluated. Liver AVBD 9 was demonstrated to have higher (p <= 0.05) gene expression in the vaccine group when compared to controls. When AVBD 9 gene expression was evaluated in the ileum, a decrease (p <= 0.05) was observed in all treatments compared to the control group. These data suggest that simultaneous administration of probiotics during coccidiosis vaccination or ionophore treatment has the ability to modulate the immune response at varying time points.
8

The Evolution of the Intestinal Microbiome of Premature Infants and Piglets Receiving Probiotics and Lactoferrin

Grzywacz, Kelly January 2016 (has links)
Probiotics and lactoferrin are currently being used in neonatal intensive care units in the hopes of reducing rates of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. While studies have shown that these measures can be clinically beneficial to premature babies, little is known about their effect at the level of the intestinal microbiome. We performed a prospective study describing the composition and evolution of the microbiota of premature babies receiving probiotics with and without lactoferrin supplementation. Furthermore, we compared our findings to a piglet model. We found that the addition of lactoferrin did not lead to a distinct microbiome using UniFrac analysis, nor increased diversity or richness as compared to probiotics alone. The relative abundance of probiotic bacterial strains was approximately 3%. At the phylum level Firmicutes and Proteobacteria predominated, while overall Enterobacteriaceae was the most abundant family. We remain the first to describe the microbiome of premature infants receiving lactoferrin.
9

The Effects of Probiotics on Performance and Immune Response of Broiler Chickens during Coccidiosis

Ritzi, Miranda Marie 05 June 2015 (has links)
Coccidiosis is endemic in the commercial broiler industry and inflicts devastating economic losses to poultry operations. Probiotics may provide a potential alternative to the prophylactic use of anticoccidials in commercial production. This study evaluated the effects of probiotic applications (feed and water) on bird performance and resistance to a mixed Eimeria infection in commercial broilers. On day of hatch, 1008 commercial male broilers (Cobb 500) were assigned to one of 6 treatments (8 replicate floor pens; 21 birds/pen), including non-infected negative control (NEG), Eimeria-infected positive control (POS), anticoccidial control (0.01% salinomycin, SAL), intermittent high dose water-applied probiotic (WPI), continuous low dose water-applied probiotic (WPC), and feed-supplemented probiotic (FSP). On d15, all birds except those in NEG were challenged with a mixed inoculum of Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, and E. tenella. Measurements were taken on d7, 15, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Fecal samples were collected from d20-d24 for oocyst counts, and lesion scores were evaluated on d21. Data were analyzed using the Fit Model platform in JMP Pro 10.0 (SAS). Differences in experimental treatments were tested using Tukey HSD following ANOVA with significance reported at P ° 0.05. Overall, NEG birds outperformed all other groups. For performance, the probiotic groups were comparable to the SAL treated birds, except during the 6 days immediately following the Eimeria species challenge, where the SAL birds exhibited better performance. WPC birds had lower duodenal and jejunal lesion scores, indicating a healthier intestine and enhanced resistance to Eimeria species compared to POS. Birds in the WPI treatment shed fewer oocysts in the feces, though this was not a trend for all of the probiotic treatment groups. The results of this study suggest probiotic supplementation without anticoccidials can enhance performance and help alleviate the negative effects of a mixed Eimeria infection. / Master of Science
10

Selection of Escherichia coli K88+ specific probiotic strains of E. coli from environmental isolates for post-weaning piglets.

Setia, Amit 12 June 2007 (has links)
Aim of this study was to select environmental E. coli isolates that produced colicins against the swine pathogen E. coli K88+. In initial evaluation using a modified plate method with 18 colicinogenic E. coli constructs, colicins E3, E4, E5, E9, Ia, K and N were found to possess inhibitory activity against 12 ETEC K88+ strains. A total of 463 environmental isolates from cattle rumen, cattle feces, pig feces and hog manure-amended soil were screened for colicin production by a modified plate test. Further, colicinogenic isolates were screened for five toxin genes LT, STa, STb, VT1 and VT2 as well as K88 (F4) fimbriae using PCR reactions. Fourteen non-pathogenic isolates were subjected to characterization of colicin genes by PCR using 9 new primer sequences, antibiotic susceptibilities and substrate utilization. Two potential probiotic strains of E. coli, UM-2 and UM-7 which produced colicins that could utilize potato starch and inulin were selected for in-vitro competition with E. coli K88+ strain 2-12. In vitro competition between the synbiotics and E. coli K88+ revealed inhibition of E. coli K88+. Based on the present in vitro studies it could be concluded that carefully selected potential synbiotics should be further studied for their role in protecting piglets from post-weaning diarrhea without antibiotics.

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