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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Study on the Architecture-Oriented Process Model

Lee, Chung-Chyi 20 June 2006 (has links)
ABSTRACT The contemporary business operations are encountering tremendous challenges. The management of the globalization, such as the supply chain management, makes the enterprise to consider making alliances, establishing the partner relationships and forming the virtual enterprise. At this time, when an enterprise wants to sustain a competitive advantage, a business process with adaptation and facilitation to support the operations of the organization is necessary. Therefore, a good modeling in business process can get value-added to the enterprise. There are a lot of techniques for business process modeling. Each technique of modeling has its advantages and disadvantages. This paper presents a technique of architecture-oriented process modeling, which is an integrated model with structure and process in one unity. In order to show the excellent performances of the architecture-oriented process model, a comparison was made between the architecture-oriented process model and those traditional process models. It is shown that the architecture-oriented process model has the merits of the capability to satisfy not only the functional, behavioral, organizational, and informational perspectives of modeling an enterprise, but also the concurrency and executable ability. Finally, two cases are presented to explain the abilities of this model. The architecture-oriented modeling is thriving, the author believes that the continuing discussions and investigations will have a great beneficiary to the total solution of the problems of the varied environments of the business operations and thereof.
2

What we know and what we do not know about DMN

Mendling, Jan, Figl, Kathrin, Tokdemir, Gul, Vanthienen, Jan January 2018 (has links) (PDF)
The recent Decision Model and Notation (DMN) establishes business decisions as first-class citizens of executable business processes. This research note has two objectives: first, to describe DMN's technical and theoretical foundations; second, to identify research directions for investigating DMN's potential benefits on a technological, individual and organizational level. To this end, we integrate perspectives from management science, cognitive theory and information systems research.
3

Styles in business process modeling: an exploration and a model

Pinggera, Jakob, Soffer, Pnina, Fahland, Dirk, Weidlich, Matthias, Zugal, Stefan, Weber, Barbara, Reijers, Hajo A., Mendling, Jan 07 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Business process models are an important means to design, analyze, implement, and control business processes. As with every type of conceptual model, a business process model has to meet certain syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic quality requirements to be of value. For many years, such quality aspects were investigated by centering on the properties of the model artifact itself. Only recently, the process of model creation is considered as a factor that influences the resulting model's quality. Our work contributes to this stream of research and presents an explorative analysis of the process of process modeling (PPM). We report on two large-scale modeling sessions involving 115 students. In these sessions, the act of model creation, i.e., the PPM, was automatically recorded. We conducted a cluster analysis on this data and identified three distinct styles of modeling. Further, we investigated how both task- and modeler-specific factors influence particular aspects of those modeling styles. Based thereupon, we propose a model that captures our insights. It lays the foundations for future research that may unveil how high-quality process models can be established through better modeling support and modeling instruction. (authors' abstract)
4

A Method For Decentralized Business Process Modeling

Turetken, Oktay 01 June 2007 (has links) (PDF)
This thesis study proposes a method for organizations to perform business process modeling in a decentralized and concurrent manner. The Plural method is based on the idea that organizations&rsquo / processes can be modeled by individuals actually performing the processes. Instead of having a central and devoted group of people to understand, analyze, model and improve processes, individuals are held responsible to model and improve their own processes concurrently. These individual models are then integrated to form organization&rsquo / s process network. The method guides the application of this approach in organizations with the activities to be followed and the artifacts to be produced. To apply the method, the study also introduces a notation and a prototype toolset. A multiple-case study involving two cases is conducted in order to evaluate the applicability of the method for decentralized process modeling and validate the expected benefits.
5

Markov Process Modeling of A System Under WIPLOAD Control

Qi, Chao, Appa Iyer, Sivakumar, Ganesan, Viswanath Kumar 01 1900 (has links)
This paper analyzes a proposed release controlmethodology, WIPLOAD Control (WIPLCtrl), using a transfer line case modeled by Markov process modeling methodology. The performance of WIPLCtrl is compared with that of CONWIP under 13 system configurations in terms of throughput, average inventory level, as well as average cycle time. As a supplement to the analytical model, a simulation model of the transfer line is used to observe the performance of the release control methodologies on the standard deviation of cycle time. From the analysis, we identify the system configurations in which the advantages of WIPLCtrl could be observed. / Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA)
6

The Application of Ontologies to Reasoning with Process Modeling Formalisms

Tan, Xing 31 August 2012 (has links)
Reasoning about processes in applications such as manufacturing, web services, enterprise modeling, and planning requires the representation of composite processes with complicated flows of control. Previous research in process representation has used formalisms such as Event Systems, Petri nets, and the Unified Modeling Language activity diagrams. The computational hardness of temporal projection problems in Event Systems has been extensively examined in the literature, whereas Petri nets and UML activity diagrams are applied to describe more elaborate processes. This thesis takes a systematic look into the temporal reasoning problems in Event Systems and assigns accurate semantics to both Petri nets and, for the first time, to UML activity diagrams. We give an analysis of computational complexity in temporal projection problems by exploring the boundary between their tractable and intractable subproblems. Our results provide new insights into the prominent role the properties of partial ordering play, however we also show that partial ordering is not the sole source of the intractability as has been claimed in an earlier work by Nebel and B{\"a}ckstr{\"o}m. Two influential modeling languages, Petri nets and UML activity diagrams, are axiomatized as two Basic Action Theories of Situation Calculus. They are called, respectively, SCOPE (Situation Calculus Ontology of PEtri nets) and SCAD (Situation Calculus theory of Activity Diagrams). We provide a Prolog implementation of SCOPE and prove the correctness of this program for regressable queries. We use SCAD to axiomatize the structural and dynamic properties of UML activity diagrams and also provide the first set of computational results with regard to the reachability problems in activity diagrams. The correctness of each of these two axiomatizations is also demonstrated by proving that the theory is satisfiable, and the intended interpretation corresponds to a model of the theory.
7

The Application of Ontologies to Reasoning with Process Modeling Formalisms

Tan, Xing 31 August 2012 (has links)
Reasoning about processes in applications such as manufacturing, web services, enterprise modeling, and planning requires the representation of composite processes with complicated flows of control. Previous research in process representation has used formalisms such as Event Systems, Petri nets, and the Unified Modeling Language activity diagrams. The computational hardness of temporal projection problems in Event Systems has been extensively examined in the literature, whereas Petri nets and UML activity diagrams are applied to describe more elaborate processes. This thesis takes a systematic look into the temporal reasoning problems in Event Systems and assigns accurate semantics to both Petri nets and, for the first time, to UML activity diagrams. We give an analysis of computational complexity in temporal projection problems by exploring the boundary between their tractable and intractable subproblems. Our results provide new insights into the prominent role the properties of partial ordering play, however we also show that partial ordering is not the sole source of the intractability as has been claimed in an earlier work by Nebel and B{\"a}ckstr{\"o}m. Two influential modeling languages, Petri nets and UML activity diagrams, are axiomatized as two Basic Action Theories of Situation Calculus. They are called, respectively, SCOPE (Situation Calculus Ontology of PEtri nets) and SCAD (Situation Calculus theory of Activity Diagrams). We provide a Prolog implementation of SCOPE and prove the correctness of this program for regressable queries. We use SCAD to axiomatize the structural and dynamic properties of UML activity diagrams and also provide the first set of computational results with regard to the reachability problems in activity diagrams. The correctness of each of these two axiomatizations is also demonstrated by proving that the theory is satisfiable, and the intended interpretation corresponds to a model of the theory.
8

Factors of Process Model Comprehension - Findings from a Series of Experiments

Mendling, Jan, Strembeck, Mark, Recker, Jan 14 January 2012 (has links) (PDF)
In order to make good decisions about the design of information systems, an essential skill is to understand process models of the business domain the system is intended to support. Yet, little knowledge to date has been established about the factors that affect how model users comprehend the content of process models. In this study, we use theories of semiotics and cognitive load to theorize how model and personal factors influence how model viewers comprehend the syntactical information of process models. We then report on a four-part series of experiments, in which we examined these factors. Our results show that additional semantical information impedes syntax comprehension, and that theoretical knowledge eases syntax comprehension. Modeling experience further contributes positively to comprehension efficiency, measured as the ratio of correct answers to the time taken to provide answers. We discuss implications for practice and research.
9

How Collaborative Technology Supports Cognitive Processes in Collaborative Process Modeling: A Capabilities-Gains-Outcome Model

Recker, Jan, Mendling, Jan, Hahn, Christopher 11 1900 (has links) (PDF)
We examine which capabilities technologies provide to support collaborative process modeling. We develop a model that explains how technology capabilities impact cognitive group processes, and how they lead to improved modeling outcomes and positive technology beliefs. We test this model through a free simulation experiment of collaborative process modelers structured around a set of modeling tasks. With our study, we provide an understanding of the process of collaborative process modeling, and detail implications for research and guidelines for the practical design of collaborative process modeling.
10

Process Model and Sensor Based Optimization of Polyimide Prepreg Compaction During Composite Cure

Magato, James 28 August 2018 (has links)
No description available.

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