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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Survey of Psychology Professionals on Their Involvement in Sport and Performance Psychology Services

Jackson, Randi D. 12 1900 (has links)
This study examined professional practice issues in sport psychology such as qualifications, credentialing, graduate training, and the scope of practice in order to address questions about who should be teaching and providing such services. We used frequencies, t-tests, and chi-square analyses to assess trends among licensed psychologists in the subdiscipline of sport psychology. Analyses show that 26.7% (n = 52) reported providing services to individual athletes and 17.9% (n = 35) to teams in which their work focused on directly improving sport performances. Additionally, 58.5% (n = 114) reported providing mental health services to individual athletes and 10.3% (n = 20) to sport teams. These results suggest services provided to individual athletes and groups/teams of athletes seem to emphasize mental health concerns. Regarding supervision, 18.5% (n = 36) indicated they had received supervision related to improving athletes' sport performance and 35.9% (n = 70) for mental health services they had provided. Another 17.5% (n = 34) indicated having provided supervision to other professionals who were working with athletes to improve their sport performance and 40.0% (n = 78) for those who were addressing athletes' mental health. Overall, 26 (13.3%) of the psychologists had published articles concerning sport and performance psychology in scientific journals; men (25.4%) were more likely than women (7.8%) to have done so, X 2 (1) = 11.26, p = .001. Issues related to training, professional involvement, and ethics in this growing field are discussed. Future directions for this research are also explored.
2

Exploring the development of critical incident response teams

Lockhart, Charlotte Fiona January 2012 (has links)
Children sometimes experience loss and trauma through critical incidents such as unexpected bereavement through accidental death which can have negative psychological effects. In many countries, where there is a school psychology service, it would seem likely that an Educational Psychologist could be involved in order to mitigate such psychological effects. Support led by Educational Psychologists and others is often organised through Critical Incident Response Teams.Since 1994 a range of support offered by Educational Psychology Services in England has been documented in the literature. There is information in the literature about the range of professionals involved and the type of support that is offered. However, it is not clear why some responses/teams are more sustainable and why they vary in structure. The literature broadly specifies critical incident responses, but this research aims to provide a more detailed specification, sharply focussed on the process of developing a Critical Incident Response Team.The present study involved a series of interviews at seven Local Authorities which have Critical Incident Response Teams all of which have been operational for at least five years. Multiple sources of evidence are used, namely semi-structured interviews with lead Educational Psychologists for critical incident support and other Educational Psychologists and professionals who are part of the Critical Incident Response Team. The transcriptions of all the semi-structured interviews were analysed using content analysis and thematic analysis. The findings were used to propose a theoretical model, containing indications of context, personnel and process factors to consider for the development of a sustainable Critical Incident Response Team.
3

Parent and caregiver experiences of a higher education rural school partnership providing educational psychology services

Grobler, Lidalize January 2017 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to explore and describe parents' and caregivers' retrospective experiences of a higher education-rural school partnership providing educational psychology services. The study aimed to inform knowledge on community engagement with schools and forms part of the broad FLY (Flourishing Learning Youth) community engagement initiative that has been ongoing since 2006. The current study utilised interpretivism as metatheory and qualitative research as methodological paradigm. An instrumental case study design was utilised, with a specific higher education-rural school partnership conveniently sampled. Subsequently twelve parents or caregivers to a child/ren who participated in the relevant community engagement initiative at any time since 2006, were purposefully selected. Two field visits were taken for data collection purposes; the first included Participatory Reflection and Action (PRA) discussions between participants, whilst the second visit entailed member checking. I relied on written recording of the participants' dialogue on PRA posters, audio recordings of their poster presentations, observations throughout the process, photographs taken and a reflective journal as data collection and documentation strategies. From thematic data analysis two main themes emerged. Firstly, participants identified the partnership as a platform of educational opportunity, which allowed for children's development on a cognitive and socio-emotional level. Secondly, participants emphasised their hope for the continuation and growth of the partnership in the future. Participants expect the partnership to broaden in multiple ways, such as involving parents and caregivers, providing them with a safe space to voice their opinions, and incorporating a parental guidance element. Based on the findings of the study I can conclude that according to parents and caregivers, community engagement with schools provides an opportunity for the mobilisation of children assets to result in their positive development. Furthermore, when additionally activating the assets of the parents, community engagement can be strengthened. / Dissertation (MEd)--University of Pretoria, 2017. / Educational Psychology / MEd / Unrestricted

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