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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Gender differences in responses to differential outcomes

Linders, Lisa M. January 2003 (has links)
The present study examined the emotional responses of 112 dyads of same-sex friends in early and middle childhood as they competed against each other on 3 identical games, enabling each child in the pair to experience 3 outcome conditions: winning, losing, and tying. Emotional reactions were videotaped and rated for degree of enjoyment and discomfort. In addition, following the 3 games, children were individually interviewed and asked to report their levels of happiness regarding winning, losing, and tying. The social context of a dyad is more closely associated with female social interaction which tends to be egalitarian. It was hypothesized that boys' well-documented greater comfort with competition relative to girls would be attenuated in the context of a dyad. Results indicated that boys showed more comfort and enjoyment throughout the competitive process than did girls. However, both boys and girls showed equal levels of comfort and enjoyment for the win and tie outcomes, indicating boys, like girls, were also concerned with doing the same as their friend. A developmental difference was also seen as the children in middle childhood reported less happiness than the kindergarten children when they experienced the win outcome. The results are discussed in terms of the necessity of considering the social context in which competition occurs when investigating gender differences in competition.
2

Gender differences in responses to differential outcomes

Linders, Lisa M. January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
3

Thinking styles, treatment preferences, and early counseling process and outcome / Client-therapist similarity

Lampropoulos, Georgios January 2006 (has links)
In this study, two primary hypotheses drawn from Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory (Epstein, 1994, 1998, 2003) and the treatment preference literature (Arnkoff, Glass, & Shapiro, 2002) were tested in the broader contexts of similarity/matching research and eclecticism in psychotherapy. Specifically, it was hypothesized that client-therapist similarity/dissimilarity in terms of (a) their Rational and Experiential Thinking styles (Pacini & Epstein, 1999), and (b) their preferences for a Cognitive ("Thinking") versus an Experiential ("Feeling") theoretical orientation (Hutchins, 1984), would affect the process and outcome of early therapy. Forty-seven client-therapist dyads participated in the study. In the seven hierarchical linear regressions conducted, no statistically significant effects were found on any of the dependent variables (working alliance, empathic understanding, session depth, session smoothness, satisfaction with treatment, perceived change, and objective change). Study limitations included its modest statistical power to detect small and moderate effect sizes.Three exploratory questions were also investigated in a sample of 89 clients and 79 therapists and were found to be statistically significant. Specifically, client rational and experiential thinking styles made substantial contributions in the expected direction in predicting client preference for a cognitive versus an experiential treatment. Similarly, therapist experiential thinking style was predictive of therapist treatment preference. These findings suggest that client and therapist personality (thinking styles) are more significant predictors of treatment preference than variables such as gender and clinical experience (as a therapist or a client). Last, rational thinking style was predictive of client intrapersonal adjustment, and experiential thinking style was predictive of client social adjustment. / Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
4

The relationship between client-established goals and outcome in counseling /

Schwenn, Heidi H. January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2002. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 90-95). Also available on the Internet.
5

The relationship between client-established goals and outcome in counseling

Schwenn, Heidi H. January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2002. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 90-95). Also available on the Internet.
6

Disclosure to Spouses – What Patients Reveal About Their Individual Psychotherapy

Khurgin-Bott, Rachel January 2016 (has links)
The primary aim of this study was to investigate the content and extent of psychotherapy patients’ disclosures to their spouses or significant others about their experiences in therapy, the perceived impact of disclosure about therapy on the spousal relationship, and its perceived impact on the therapeutic relationship and on treatment satisfaction. Adult psychotherapy patients (N = 84) in individual treatment, who identified themselves as either married or in a significant romantic relationship completed the Disclosure About Therapy Inventory – Revised (DATI-R; Khurgin-Bott & Farber, 2014), a revision of the Disclosure About Therapy Inventory (see Khurgin-Bott & Farber, 2011). This 52-question survey was designed to explore the extent and content of patients’ disclosures to their therapists, and the extent and content of their disclosures about therapy to their spouses or significant others (“partners”). The DATI-R also includes three outcome measures: the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS; Busby, Christensen, Crand, & Larson, 1995) measures the quality of participants’ relationships with their partners, the Working Alliance Inventory – Short Revised (WAI-SR; Hatcher & Gillaspy, 2006) assesses the quality of their relationships (alliances) with their therapists, and the outcome items of the Disclosure to Therapist Inventory-III (DTI-III) assess their satisfaction with their treatment. Findings indicate that overall, patients were very disclosing to their therapists and moderately disclosing to their partners about their therapy. No demographic variables (including gender, marital status, duration of psychotherapy, and duration of marriage/relationship) were significantly associated with or predictive of the extent of patients’ self-disclosure about therapy. A significant positive association was found between the extent of disclosure to partners about therapy and the extent of self-disclosure to therapists. Greater extent of disclosure about therapy to partners was also associated with better quality of therapeutic alliances and with higher relationship satisfaction (with partners). Additionally, the quality of therapeutic alliances was strongly predictive of better treatment outcomes. These findings suggest that married (or coupled) patients in individual psychotherapy may benefit from the open discussion of their experiences in therapy with their spouses or significant others, or at least that such openness is characteristic of patients in satisfactory relationships (both therapeutic and marital). These findings are discussed in the context of the methodological limitations of the current study and the particular characteristics of the sample, and clinical implications and directions for future research are explored.
7

Personality traits of patients participating in a group programme at a private psychiatric day clinic

Oakes, Elizabeth Jean January 2003 (has links)
The current trend in psychiatric health care is towards comprehensive primary healthcare for all South Africans. This has been has been achieved by the restructuring of the National Health System (NHS) into national, provincial, district, and community levels, which provide outpatient and inpatient care at primary, secondary, and tertiary care levels. Assessment and treatment in the form of physical and psychosocial interventions form an integral part of psychiatric care. The value of personality assessment and, in particular, the potential for matching patient personality types with effective treatment options, may play a role in facilitating effective health care in the future. An overview of the literature indicates that little research has been done regarding the area of personality traits of psychiatric patients in South Africa. This study aims to explore and describe the personality traits or profile of individuals attending a private psychiatric day care facility in The Nelson Mandela Metropole (i.e., Parkwood Day Clinic). The sample consisted of 196 participants (104 male and 92 female) who attended a group programme from April 2000 to April 2001. As part of the programme, patients were required to com plete a series of pencil-and-paper measures. The questionnaires selected for this study included a biographical questionnaire, which was used to describe the biographical variables of the sample with regard to gender, age and marital status, and The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R) (Costa & McCrae, 1992a), which was used as a measure of personality. The NEO PI-R is considered a concise measure of the five major domains of personality and some of the more important traits that define each domain. Together, the five domains Neuroticism (N), Extraversion (E), Openness (O), Agreeableness (A) and Conscientiousness (C), and the six facets within each domain, allow for a comprehensive assessment of adult personality. xiv An exploratory, descriptive method was used in the study, and the data was analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics, including correlations, cluster analysis, and multivariate analysis of variance. Key findings include the following: Results from the NEO PI-R domains showed a personality profile of very high scores for N, and average scores for E, O, A, and C. Within the sample, cluster analysis revealed five distinct personality profile clusters. For the biographical variable gender, significant differences were found between males and females on N, with the majority of males scoring in the category of Very High and High, and the majority of females scoring in the Average category. For the variable age, the results indicated significant differences on A, with participants in the young adulthood group scoring significantly lower on A than participants in the middle adulthood group. For marital status, on the domain of O, significant differences were found between the divorced or widowed and the married, with the married scoring in the Low category and the divorced or widowed in the Average category. On the domain of C, significant differences were noted between the singles group and the currently or previously married groups, with the single group tending to score lower on C than both other groups. These findings reveal a need for further research into personality traits and psychiatric samples, as consideration of personality traits based on the profile established, may be useful in matching patients’ characteristics with optimal treatment options.

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