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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Self-managing publish/subscribe systems

Jaeger, Michael A. Unknown Date (has links) (PDF)
Berlin, Techn. University, Diss., 2007.
2

Distributed resource management with monetary incentives

Tanner, Andreas. January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Berlin, Techn. Univ., Diss., 2005. / Computerdatei im Fernzugriff.
3

Flexible Distributed Business Process Management

Muthusamy, Vinod 11 January 2012 (has links)
Many large business processes are inherently distributed, spanning multiple organizations, administrative domains, and geographic locations. To support such applications, this thesis develops a flexible and distributed platform to develop, execute, and monitor business processes. The solutions utilize a distributed content-based publish/subscribe overlay that is extended with support for mobile clients and client interest churn. Over this layer, a distributed execution engine uses events to coordinate the execution of the process, and dynamically redeploys activities in the process in order to minimize a user-specified cost function and preserve service level agreements (SLAs). Finally, a management layer allows users to find and automatically compose services available across a distributed set of service registries, and monitor processes for SLA violations. Evaluations show that the distributed execution engine can scale better than alternate architectures, exhibiting over 60% improvements in execution time in one experiment. As well the system can dynamically redeploy processes to reflect changing workload conditions and SLAs, saving up to 90% of the process messaging overhead of a static deployment.
4

Flexible Distributed Business Process Management

Muthusamy, Vinod 11 January 2012 (has links)
Many large business processes are inherently distributed, spanning multiple organizations, administrative domains, and geographic locations. To support such applications, this thesis develops a flexible and distributed platform to develop, execute, and monitor business processes. The solutions utilize a distributed content-based publish/subscribe overlay that is extended with support for mobile clients and client interest churn. Over this layer, a distributed execution engine uses events to coordinate the execution of the process, and dynamically redeploys activities in the process in order to minimize a user-specified cost function and preserve service level agreements (SLAs). Finally, a management layer allows users to find and automatically compose services available across a distributed set of service registries, and monitor processes for SLA violations. Evaluations show that the distributed execution engine can scale better than alternate architectures, exhibiting over 60% improvements in execution time in one experiment. As well the system can dynamically redeploy processes to reflect changing workload conditions and SLAs, saving up to 90% of the process messaging overhead of a static deployment.
5

Management of Uncertainties in Publish/Subscribe System

Liu, Haifeng 18 February 2010 (has links)
In the publish/subscribe paradigm, information providers disseminate publications to all consumers who have expressed interest by registering subscriptions. This paradigm has found wide-spread applications, ranging from selective information dissemination to network management. However, all existing publish/subscribe systems cannot capture uncertainty inherent to the information in either subscriptions or publications. In many situations the large number of data sources exhibit various kinds of uncertainties. Examples of imprecision include: exact knowledge to either specify subscriptions or publications is not available; the match between a subscription and a publication with uncertain data is approximate; the constraints used to define a match is not only content based, but also take the semantic information into consideration. All these kinds of uncertainties have not received much attention in the context of publish/subscribe systems. In this thesis, we propose new publish/subscribe models to express uncertainties and semantics in publications and subscriptions, along with the matching semantics for each model. We also develop efficient algorithms to perform filtering for our models so that it can be applied to process the rapidly increasing information on the Internet. A thorough experimental evaluation is presented to demonstrate that the proposed systems can offer scalability to large number of subscribers and high publishing rates.
6

Management of Uncertainties in Publish/Subscribe System

Liu, Haifeng 18 February 2010 (has links)
In the publish/subscribe paradigm, information providers disseminate publications to all consumers who have expressed interest by registering subscriptions. This paradigm has found wide-spread applications, ranging from selective information dissemination to network management. However, all existing publish/subscribe systems cannot capture uncertainty inherent to the information in either subscriptions or publications. In many situations the large number of data sources exhibit various kinds of uncertainties. Examples of imprecision include: exact knowledge to either specify subscriptions or publications is not available; the match between a subscription and a publication with uncertain data is approximate; the constraints used to define a match is not only content based, but also take the semantic information into consideration. All these kinds of uncertainties have not received much attention in the context of publish/subscribe systems. In this thesis, we propose new publish/subscribe models to express uncertainties and semantics in publications and subscriptions, along with the matching semantics for each model. We also develop efficient algorithms to perform filtering for our models so that it can be applied to process the rapidly increasing information on the Internet. A thorough experimental evaluation is presented to demonstrate that the proposed systems can offer scalability to large number of subscribers and high publishing rates.
7

NoSQL Data Stores In Publish/Subscribe-Based RESTful Web Services

2013 September 1900 (has links)
In the era of mobile cloud computing, the consumption of virtualized software and Web-based services from super-back-end infrastructure using smartphones and tablets is gaining much research attention from both the industry and academia. Nowadays, these mobile devices generate and access multimedia data hosted in social media and other sources in order to enhance the users’ multimedia experience. However, multimedia data is unstructured which can lead to challenges with data synchronization between these mobile devices and the cloud computing back-end. The issue with data synchronization is further fueled by the fact that mobile devices can experience intermittent connectivity losses due to unstable wireless bandwidths. While previous works proposed Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) -based middleware for the Web services’ synchronization, this approach is not efficient in a mobile environment because the SOAP protocol is verbose. Thus, the Representational State Transfer (REST) standard has been proposed recently to model the Web services since it is lightweight. This thesis proposes a novel approach for implementing a REST-based mobile Web Service for multimedia file sharing that utilizes a channel-based publish/subscribe communication scheme to synchronize smartphone or tablet-hosted NoSQL databases with a cloud-hosted NoSQL database. This thesis evaluates the synchronicity and the scalability of a prototype system that was implemented according to this approach. Also, this thesis assesses the overhead of the middleware component of the system.
8

A distributed publish subscribe notification service for pervasive environments

Zeidler, Andreas. Unknown Date (has links)
Techn. University, Diss., 2004--Darmstadt.
9

Adaptation Techniques for Publish/Subscribe Overlays

Yoon, Young 13 August 2013 (has links)
Publish/Subscribe (in short pub/sub) allows clients that share common interest communicate in an asynchronous and loosely-coupled fashion. This paradigm is adopted by many distributed event-driven applications such as social networking services, distributed business processes and cyber-physical systems. These applications cannot afford to have the underlying pub/sub substrate perform unreliably, permanently fail or behave arbitrarily as it will cause significant disturbance to stably serving many end-users. Therefore, a research effort on making pub/sub systems resilient against various failures to sustain high quality of service to the clients is imperative. In this thesis, we focus on the overlay of pub/sub brokers that are widely adopted as a popular architecture for large-scale pub/sub systems. Broker overlays can suffer from various issues such as degradation of topology quality, brokers causing transient or permanent benign failures and Byzantine brokers behaving arbitrarily. We aim to make novel research contributions by exploring fundamental techniques that can help the broker overlays maintain functional and non-functional requirements even under the presence of the aforementioned failures and necessary administrative updates. We first build a set of overlay adaptation primitives that re-configure topologies such as shifting links and replicating brokers. These primitives are designed to involve a small local group of brokers in the pub/sub overlays so that the disruption during the execution of large-scale and dynamic changes can be controlled in a fined-grained manner. For the problem of degrading topology quality, automated planning systems are developed to find a sequence of adaptations that would cause minimal disruption to running services. Also, our primitives can be executed on demand to quickly fail-over a crashed broker or off-load congested brokers. In addition, these on-demand primitives can be used to form a group of dynamically replicated brokers that enforce a novel safety measure to prevent Byzantine brokers from sabotaging the pub/sub overlays. Our contributions are evaluated with systematic consideration of various trade-offs between functional and non-functional properties.
10

Adaptation Techniques for Publish/Subscribe Overlays

Yoon, Young 13 August 2013 (has links)
Publish/Subscribe (in short pub/sub) allows clients that share common interest communicate in an asynchronous and loosely-coupled fashion. This paradigm is adopted by many distributed event-driven applications such as social networking services, distributed business processes and cyber-physical systems. These applications cannot afford to have the underlying pub/sub substrate perform unreliably, permanently fail or behave arbitrarily as it will cause significant disturbance to stably serving many end-users. Therefore, a research effort on making pub/sub systems resilient against various failures to sustain high quality of service to the clients is imperative. In this thesis, we focus on the overlay of pub/sub brokers that are widely adopted as a popular architecture for large-scale pub/sub systems. Broker overlays can suffer from various issues such as degradation of topology quality, brokers causing transient or permanent benign failures and Byzantine brokers behaving arbitrarily. We aim to make novel research contributions by exploring fundamental techniques that can help the broker overlays maintain functional and non-functional requirements even under the presence of the aforementioned failures and necessary administrative updates. We first build a set of overlay adaptation primitives that re-configure topologies such as shifting links and replicating brokers. These primitives are designed to involve a small local group of brokers in the pub/sub overlays so that the disruption during the execution of large-scale and dynamic changes can be controlled in a fined-grained manner. For the problem of degrading topology quality, automated planning systems are developed to find a sequence of adaptations that would cause minimal disruption to running services. Also, our primitives can be executed on demand to quickly fail-over a crashed broker or off-load congested brokers. In addition, these on-demand primitives can be used to form a group of dynamically replicated brokers that enforce a novel safety measure to prevent Byzantine brokers from sabotaging the pub/sub overlays. Our contributions are evaluated with systematic consideration of various trade-offs between functional and non-functional properties.

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