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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
51

Knowing our users and responding to their needs-The impact of research on services in two university libraries

Ling, Zhang, Wang, Cong, McCarthy, Austin January 2006 (has links)
In an earlier paper the authors discussed reference services in two university libraries and suggested changes to the services based on a user survey. They also quoted research into staff and student use of information resources. Although libraries have no difficulty in compiling quantitative data, the use of such qualitative research to delve beyond the statistics, in order to better understand user needs, perceptions and behaviours, is a recent development at Harbin Engineering University Library, China. However, at the Library of the University of Northumbria in England there is a long history of using research to evaluate services. This paper gives a very brief introduction to the value of qualitative re-search in evaluating services and providing a sound basis for management decisions about staffing and service delivery. Some of the methods used at the two universities are outlined. Finally, two case studies of research projects, one from each university, will be described and the extent to which they have resulted in changes to policies or practices will be examined.
52

Personal Information Management Strategies and Tactics Used by Senior Engineers

Pikas, Christina K. January 2007 (has links)
This paper reports the results of an exploratory qualitative study of how senior engineers in a research laboratory environment do personal information management (PIM). Responsive, semi-structured interviews were conducted with four senior engineers. Thirteen themes in four groupings emerged. The four groupings are: organization and retrieval, un-organized aspects, information keeping and preservation, and use of specialized tools. Themes not seen in other studies are: writing to remember and reporting to retrieve, and personal handbooks. The themes are described in detail. Implications for the design of information systems and future work are discussed.
53

The New Normal: A Bourdieusian Examination of Living into Young Adulthood being a Paediatric Heart Transplant Recipient

Mauthner, Oliver Erich 01 April 2014 (has links)
Improved success of paediatric cardiac transplantation has resulted in increased survival of recipients into young adulthood (19 to 29 years of age). Young adults who received a heart transplant during childhood have experienced multiple life sustaining procedures. As survival and longevity increase, it is clear that transplant recipients experience negative physiological, psychological and social sequelae. With heart transplant offering individuals a chance to extend life into young adulthood, recipients need lifelong care and at age 18 they will transition from paediatric to adult healthcare facilities. The study addressed young adults circumstances of existence and their competing interests within various social environments. This research project applied Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical concepts of habitus, field and capital, to conceptualize and engage with empirical knowledge production about young adults who have received a heart transplant during childhood. Using visual methodology, focused open-ended interviews were conducted with 12 young adults who had a heart transplant during childhood. Bourdieu’s work provided a theoretical framework to investigate transplant recipients’ identities and social repositioning in relation to dominant discourses of organ transplant and shifting relationships with health services providers. This study involved an iterative process to identify recipients’ encounters and new compositions in relation with others, in order to answer the research objective. These findings highlight that young adult transplant recipients struggle with relational dispositions that excludes them from various fields of social engagement; their struggle and exclusion from various fields is symbolic and is embedded in the structure of the dominant social order of the field from where they become excluded; the social order is taken up and embodied, leading young transplant recipients to practices of accommodation and “normalization”. Changes in healthcare practices, attuned to person implications and peer relationships can begin to address young transplant recipients’ contradictory social positions. Such an approach can potentially lead to improvement in ongoing care and services for young adults who require a lifetime of care. At the same time, it will allow nurses to better prepare and counsel young individuals who are preparing for a heart transplant.
54

The New Normal: A Bourdieusian Examination of Living into Young Adulthood being a Paediatric Heart Transplant Recipient

Mauthner, Oliver Erich 01 April 2014 (has links)
Improved success of paediatric cardiac transplantation has resulted in increased survival of recipients into young adulthood (19 to 29 years of age). Young adults who received a heart transplant during childhood have experienced multiple life sustaining procedures. As survival and longevity increase, it is clear that transplant recipients experience negative physiological, psychological and social sequelae. With heart transplant offering individuals a chance to extend life into young adulthood, recipients need lifelong care and at age 18 they will transition from paediatric to adult healthcare facilities. The study addressed young adults circumstances of existence and their competing interests within various social environments. This research project applied Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical concepts of habitus, field and capital, to conceptualize and engage with empirical knowledge production about young adults who have received a heart transplant during childhood. Using visual methodology, focused open-ended interviews were conducted with 12 young adults who had a heart transplant during childhood. Bourdieu’s work provided a theoretical framework to investigate transplant recipients’ identities and social repositioning in relation to dominant discourses of organ transplant and shifting relationships with health services providers. This study involved an iterative process to identify recipients’ encounters and new compositions in relation with others, in order to answer the research objective. These findings highlight that young adult transplant recipients struggle with relational dispositions that excludes them from various fields of social engagement; their struggle and exclusion from various fields is symbolic and is embedded in the structure of the dominant social order of the field from where they become excluded; the social order is taken up and embodied, leading young transplant recipients to practices of accommodation and “normalization”. Changes in healthcare practices, attuned to person implications and peer relationships can begin to address young transplant recipients’ contradictory social positions. Such an approach can potentially lead to improvement in ongoing care and services for young adults who require a lifetime of care. At the same time, it will allow nurses to better prepare and counsel young individuals who are preparing for a heart transplant.
55

Meaning and process in early adolescent friendship conversations

Haber, Carla Joanne 05 1900 (has links)
This qualitative study utilized the action-project theory and method to investigate the close, long-term friendships (two to ten years in duration) of female, early adolescent dyads. Ten early adolescent girls between the ages of 11 and 13 were studied. The purpose of this study was twofold; first, to determine the characteristics of best friendship projects and how they manifested within early adolescent friendship conversations and; second, to investigate the nature of self-representations (descriptions of the self) made by the participants. The processes (cognitive, affective, and behavioural) and meaning (goals) of friendship jointly expressed within the conversations were identified. As well, self-representations were analyzed from the perspective of whether they functioned to advance friendship projects. In addition to the friendship conversations, collages explicating the girls’ meanings and processes around their close friendships were also explored through an individual interview with each participant. The participants engaged in five friendship projects within their friendship conversations. First, an overriding project to preserve and maintain the friendship was demonstrated. Other sub-projects demonstrated within the conversations were the desire to have fun, to provide support to each other, and to connect with each other. Simultaneously, while jointly enacting other friendship projects, the participants also demonstrated through action, the project of exploring and discovering aspects of their identities. Multiple functional steps (the means) to achieve these projects were utilized. Gossip, fictional and factual storytelling, teasing, joking, problem solving, asking for advice, and displaying physical affection are examples of these means. Self-representations from the conversations were not always consistent with those revealed during self-confrontation interviews, at times in the service of achieving friendship goals. Self-representations between the collage interviews and the friendship conversations were very consistent, suggesting the complementary nature of the data sources. Meanings and processes gleaned from the friendship conversations were also very consistent with those found within the friendship collages. Implications of these findings for parents, educators, and counsellors are discussed.
56

Christian Women Discuss the Influence of Faith on their Career Development

Agboka, Christelle 28 May 2008 (has links)
For many young adults, career decision-making is a challenge that may lead to feelings of disequilibrium, stress, and anxiety. This disequilibrium may be especially problematic for young Christian women. On one hand, their belief system may provide a stabilizing anchor, and embue them with a sense of purpose (Fowler, 1981). On the other hand, distinct Christian values may further perpetuate traditional male-female roles and thus limit their labour force participation (Scott, 2002). To better understand this dichotomy and add to the limited research on this topic, my study explored the relationship between Christian faith and career development with a sample of four women (ages 33 to 51) already established in their careers. Research data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Each interview was preceded by the construction of a lifeline, or timeline of major events in the participant’s life (Campbell & Ungar, 2004). Themes emerging from case and cross analyses were (a) life story, (b) centrality of motherhood, and (c) spiritual grounding. These three themes were first reported for each participant as an individual case, and then in an overview of findings across cases. Implications for post-secondary career counsellors, based on this study’s results, as well as on relevant literature, focus on incorporating the notion of calling into three traditional career development activities: (a) self-discovery; (b) exploration and research; and (c) formulating a plan. Implications for career development researchers include: (a) creating a comprehensive theory reflecting spiritual and non-spiritual factors in women’s career development; (b) studying this topic with different methodologies; and (c) undertaking a best practices study of career programs integrating calling at secular or non-secular universities. These practical and theoretical implications may provide post-secondary career counsellors guidance on how to direct young women of diverse faith backgrounds to explore and pursue their fields of choice. / Thesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2008-05-27 13:40:29.543
57

THE EXPERIENTIAL PROCESS OF ACQUIRING WISDOM: HOW WISE INDIVIDUALS REPORT LEARNING LIFE LESSONS

Taylor, Connie 20 September 2010 (has links)
Philosophers have considered and debated the topic of wisdom for centuries. Now, as we face an ageing world population, a need for the scientific exploration of the topic has arisen. Over the past 30 years, the challenge to understand and define wisdom has been taken up and studied mainly by the fields of psychology and sociology. A body of wisdom literature has emerged and this thesis addresses an identified gap in that literature concerning the development of wisdom. This thesis examines the process of acquiring wisdom across the human lifespan. Specifically, this qualitative exploratory case study examines the process employed by wise nominees when transforming a personal life experience into a life lesson. The opinions, experiences, and relationship descriptions of their nominators are uniquely included in the study’s findings. Each of the four cases in the study is comprised of a dyad, a nominator and their wise nominee. Data were collected from the study participants through questionnaires and in-depth interviews. A framework, comprised of three components, that begins to describe the wisdom acquisition process emerged from the study’s findings. The first element of the emerging wisdom acquisition framework is a new succinct definition of wisdom. The second element is a model that describes the iterative process of learning from life experiences. This model was hypothesized at the outset of the study and obtained some corroboration from the study’s data. The third element of the emerging framework is the life management practices that wise individuals employ to deal with life experiences. These practices emerged as four central themes from the data. Three of those four life practices revolve around self-reliance whereas the fourth theme addresses the spiritual balance in the participants’ lives. This study is a first attempt to unravel the complex phenomenon of the acquisition of wisdom. / Thesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2010-09-20 15:34:05.91
58

The role of nurse leaders in the sustainability of change

Thiele, Tracy 04 January 2013 (has links)
There is limited research examining the experiences of nurse leaders in the sustainability of change. The current literature found that nurse leaders have focused on the role of creating/leading a change in practice, and the strategies and solutions necessary for the creation of the given change (Buonocore, 2004; Morjikian, Kimball, & Joynt, 2007). Scattered amongst the literature are insights and empirical research that looks into why there is not sustainability in a change/innovation. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive study was to develop an understanding of nurse leaders’ roles, experiences, successes, and failures in the sustainability of change. Roger’s (2003) Diffusion of Innovation Theory provided the conceptual framework for the study. The experiences of eight nurse leaders, from a variety of roles representing positions of formal and informal power, were explored. The findings of this study revealed nurse leaders’ perceptions of strategies required to maintain changes in nursing practice; and provides valuable insight into the roles, experiences, and perspectives of nurse leaders in the sustainability of change.
59

On the scientific status of interpretive inquiry

Sosenko, Filip January 2007 (has links)
Interpretive social science is well established institutionally at universities and research centres. It benefits from this institutional context in terms of prestige, credibility and grants. In comparison with non-interpretive disciplines however, its scientific status is questionable. What elements of it are really scientific and what elements are threats to this scientific character? This problem has been discussed in the past but unfortunately the discussion has gradually dried up without a successful resolution. In my thesis I am revitalising it. I take a systematic rather than historical approach: instead of picking up the discussion where it has been abandoned, I begin with a working definition of science, and analyse to what extent interpretive inquiry meets the requirements of this definition. The structure of my thesis follows this definition in that what is discussed is the three substantial elements of it - theory, research method, and professional quality control. In relation to theory, I pose questions on a range of topics, such as whether interpretive social science is explanatory, and whether it generates new knowledge. In relation to method, I explore, amongst other things, whether qualitative method permits the production of valid and reliable findings. The discussion of professional quality control considers issues around the reporting of findings and the assessment of these findings by others. I complement my analysis by considering three interpretive case studies, exploring both whether they produce theoretical knowledge and reflecting on their methodological strengths and weaknesses. Additionally, I explore the border between interpretive inquiry and non-fiction arts, such as literary reportage and documentary filmmaking, arguing that this border is more blurred than it may first appear.
60

Exploring adolescents' experiences of aggression in a secondary school context / Quintin Ludick

Ludick, Quintin January 2006 (has links)
This article offers a perspective on adolescents' experiences of aggression in a secondary school, with a focus on the manifestation, contributing factors, consequences, and learners' opinions on aggression. An inductive qualitative research approach was chosen, where learners wrote about their experiences and participated in focused semi-structured interviews. Central themes were derived by means of thematic content analysis. The results revealed that a substantial number of learners experienced negative feelings about aggression at school and that aggression was related to individual characteristics, the adolescent's developmental stage, socialisation, status, competition, home environment, prior experiences, learnt behaviour and the effect of the media and music. Aggression was present among all genders. ages and cultures in school. It seemed to have a higher prevalence among boys, but was also significantly present among girls. Physical and emotional bullying had a high prevalence. which showed that bullying is problematic at schools. Passive aggression was mostly present in the form of oppositional behaviour towards authorities at school and educators are often verbally abused and ignored by learners, but their classrooms are also damaged. Individual characteristics, interpersonal relationships, multicultural interaction and a lack of sufficient social skills contributed towards many acts of aggression. Aggression was prominent in the reciprocal relationships between adolescents and their social environment. Being part of a group and forming a social identity are very important. Confiding in groups may expose learners to peer pressure, which may lead to activities and behaviour that are aggressive in nature. There were reports of discrimination and it seemed that learners get along better with others who share an equal status. This may possibly explain why aggression seemed less between white English-speaking and black English-learners, while it was more common between white Afrikaans and white/black English-speaking learners. Increased social contact between members of different social groups could reduce prejudice if these persons have an equal status. Exposure to aggression had emotional consequences, and some learners were prone to feelings of anger, fear, depression, being controlled and a loss of self-content. Behavioural responses included retaliation, pacifism, vandalism and suicide. Exposure to aggression (directly and indirectly) provoked several responses. These responses may be emotional or behavioural in nature. Emotions such as fear and anger and feeling overwhelmed, depressed and helpless may be elicited in response to aggression. Some learners may retaliate towards an aggressive incident through physical or verbal behaviour; others may withdraw and avoid social interactions. Learners may direct their aggression towards others (people and objects) or themselves. In the case of the latter, it may lead to depression, self-harm or even suicide. No single factor propels an adolescent to act aggressively. Instead, the causes of such behaviour are complex and multifaceted. Most participants in this research experienced aggression at school as unhealthy. Aggression may have emotional and behavioural consequences such as disruption, discomfort and disturbance of normal functioning. Although aggression seemed relatively under control at this particular school, there are signs of an increase in aggression and in the severity of some of the incidents, and of the possibility of desensitisation towards aggression, with the agonising possibility that aggression is serving as a form of entertainment for some learners. The need for learner involvement, school guidance programmes and life-skill training was prominent, accompanied by the need for school counsellors to assist in the management of aggression. Teachers must have better knowledge of the adolescent developmental phase so that they could understand and identify behavioural problems among learners. / Thesis (M.Sc. (Clinical Psychology))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007

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