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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Consistency in choice and form of main entry, 1982 and 1989 a comparison of Library of Congress monograph cataloging with that of the British Library and the national libraries of Australia and Canada /

Jones, Edgar Albert. January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1994. / Includes vita and abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 420-430). Also issued in print.
2

Consistency in choice and form of main entry, 1982 and 1989 a comparison of Library of Congress monograph cataloging with that of the British Library and the national libraries of Australia and Canada /

Jones, Edgar Albert. January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1994. / Includes vita and abstract. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 420-430).
3

A study of a voyage: Developing archival descriptive standards in Canada from 1987--1996.

Radford-Grant, Carol Lorraine. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.I. St.)--University of Toronto, 2007. / Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 46-06, page: 2913.
4

Identification of variables contributing to group differences in descriptive discriminant analysis

Higginbotham, Kevin Richard 02 October 2014 (has links)
The identification of predictor variables that meaningfully contribute to group differences in Descriptive Discriminant Analysis (DDA) has had conflicting guidance in the historical quantitative psychological literature. Early simulation results that tested the bias and power of the standardized coefficients and the structural coefficients were ambiguous, yet a consensus still emerged that the structural coefficients were preferred. This study reviews the historical debate and known statistical weaknesses of both standardized coefficients and structure coefficients, summarizes relevant research and proposes a Monte Carlo study that will test whether the inclusion of standardized coefficients in interpreting DDA results for both the two-group and three-group cases can assist applied researchers in meaningfully ranking variables contributing to group differences. / text
5

Galaxy clustering using the GAMA survey

Christodoulou, Leonidas January 2013 (has links)
We present a study of the clustering of galaxies in the local Universe (z < 0.4) using the SDSS and GAMA galaxy surveys. Using GAMA spectroscopic redshift we construct a large photometric redshift catalogue from the SDSS imaging data. We then measure the two-point angular correlation function as a function of photometric redshift, absolute magnitude and colour. For all our samples, we estimate the underlying redshift and absolute magnitude distributions using Monte-Carlo resampling. A linear relation between relative bias and L/L∗ is found to hold down to luminosities L ∼ 0.03L∗. We find that the redshift dependence of the bias of the L∗ population can be described by the passive evolution model of linear bias. We confirm an increase in clustering strength for sub-L∗ red galaxies compared with ∼ L∗ red galaxies at small scales in all redshift bins, whereas for the blue population the correlation length is almost independent of luminosity for ∼ L∗ galaxies and fainter. We proceed by studying the redshift space correlation function from GAMA as functions of luminosity and redshift. For L & L∗ galaxies we obtain an almost constant pairwise velocity dispersion σ12 ≈ 400 km s−1, whereas for L < L∗ galaxies the pairwise velocity dispersion increases as we go fainter. When measured in different redshift slices the pairwise velocity dispersion as a function of luminosity shows no signs of evolution, however it does present some scale dependence. Our measurements of the growth rate parameter are consistent with the standard ΛCDM+GR cosmological model.
6

Die linearen Punkt-, Ebenen- und Strahlabbildungen der darstellenden Geometrie

Rehbock, F. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität zu Berlin, 1926. / "Sonderabdruck aus: Zeitschrift für angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik, Bd. 6, 1926"--P. [1]. Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
7

Normative Influence on Athletes' Intentions to Intervene in Sport

2015 August 1900 (has links)
Previous research in the activity area has found that descriptive norms can influence individual activity (Crozier, 2014; Priebe & Spink, 2014; 2015). While important, studies examining other important outcomes in the activity area have not been conducted. For example, no research has examined whether normative information can be used to influence athletes' intentions to intervene with other teammates. In an effort to address this gap in the literature, the purpose of the current experiment was to examine whether descriptive norms, that were either supported by a coach or not, would influence a player’s intentions to intervene when teammates made technical errors or did not exert enough effort. Canadian adult soccer players (N = 106) were recruited to participate in this online experimental study. Participants were assigned to one of three conditions: normative (teammates intervene)/coach support, normative (teammates intervene)/coach not support, or attention control. Participants in both of the normative conditions read two short vignettes describing how the players and coach on a hypothetical soccer team responded to a teammate’s technical mistakes and lack of effort, respectively. While imagining themselves as a member of this hypothetical team, participants then rated their intentions to intervene with other members of this team. Results from ANCOVAs (controlling for previous intervening behaviour) revealed different results for intentions to intervene following technical mistakes versus lack of effort. Results for technical mistakes revealed a significant main effect for condition F(2, 102) = 4.98, p < 0.01. Post hoc results revealed that those in the normative condition that was supported by the coach reported greater intentions to intervene in the future than those in the control condition (p < 0.05, adj Cohen's d = 0.71). Conversely, intention to intervene did not differ between those in the normative condition that was not supported by the coach and those in the control group (p > 0.05, adj Cohen’s d = 0.13). There was no significant main effect for condition with respect to teammates exhibiting a lack of effort F(2, 95) = 1.82, p > 0.1). Results from this experiment provide initial evidence that descriptive norms supported by a coach may influence players' intentions to intervene when a teammate makes a mistake.
8

Shoulder dystocia: effective management of an obstetric emergency

Ansell (Irving), Lesley January 2009 (has links)
Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency which can result in significant maternal and neonatal morbidity, and in some cases perinatal death. It is an unpredictable event which causes stress and trauma for all concerned. Widely accepted and current management of shoulder dystocia involves performing a set of manoeuvres described in the HELPERR mnemonic, which are taught in emergency obstetric training sessions. This qualitative interpretive study presents a descriptive and hermeneutic analysis of the narratives of five clinicians who have significant experience in the management of shoulder dystocia. The qualitative descriptive approach is informed by the work of Sandelowski and it incorporates a hermeneutic ‘hue’ influenced by the work of Heidegger. This approach allowed themes to be identified from straight description. The data was then further analysed using the hermeneutic approach, to bring forth the richness and meaning of the participants’ experiences. This research approach facilitated a comprehensive analysis of the data. The findings of this research are that the management of shoulder dystocia has been influenced by HELPERR, so that practitioners most commonly follow the sequence of the mnemonic, despite the fact that some of the manoeuvres are difficult to perform or remember. Alongside this, the research shows that through their experiences, practitioners have discovered by ‘accident’ the manoeuvre of axillary traction. They find this manoeuvre not only more effective, but easier to perform in any circumstance. Another important finding of this research is that there are improved neonatal outcomes when axillary traction is the method of choice for resolving shoulder dystocia. In addition, the research highlights that practitioners who are involved with shoulder dystocia, particularly when the outcome is poor, are at risk of suffering post-traumatic stress and psychological damage, which can result in loss of the practitioner from the profession. In these ways, this research has contributed to the body of knowledge of shoulder dystocia, and more importantly, provides an alternative and effective strategy for managing shoulder dystocia.
9

Shoulder dystocia: effective management of an obstetric emergency

Ansell (Irving), Lesley January 2009 (has links)
Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency which can result in significant maternal and neonatal morbidity, and in some cases perinatal death. It is an unpredictable event which causes stress and trauma for all concerned. Widely accepted and current management of shoulder dystocia involves performing a set of manoeuvres described in the HELPERR mnemonic, which are taught in emergency obstetric training sessions. This qualitative interpretive study presents a descriptive and hermeneutic analysis of the narratives of five clinicians who have significant experience in the management of shoulder dystocia. The qualitative descriptive approach is informed by the work of Sandelowski and it incorporates a hermeneutic ‘hue’ influenced by the work of Heidegger. This approach allowed themes to be identified from straight description. The data was then further analysed using the hermeneutic approach, to bring forth the richness and meaning of the participants’ experiences. This research approach facilitated a comprehensive analysis of the data. The findings of this research are that the management of shoulder dystocia has been influenced by HELPERR, so that practitioners most commonly follow the sequence of the mnemonic, despite the fact that some of the manoeuvres are difficult to perform or remember. Alongside this, the research shows that through their experiences, practitioners have discovered by ‘accident’ the manoeuvre of axillary traction. They find this manoeuvre not only more effective, but easier to perform in any circumstance. Another important finding of this research is that there are improved neonatal outcomes when axillary traction is the method of choice for resolving shoulder dystocia. In addition, the research highlights that practitioners who are involved with shoulder dystocia, particularly when the outcome is poor, are at risk of suffering post-traumatic stress and psychological damage, which can result in loss of the practitioner from the profession. In these ways, this research has contributed to the body of knowledge of shoulder dystocia, and more importantly, provides an alternative and effective strategy for managing shoulder dystocia.
10

Shoulder dystocia: effective management of an obstetric emergency

Ansell (Irving), Lesley January 2009 (has links)
Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency which can result in significant maternal and neonatal morbidity, and in some cases perinatal death. It is an unpredictable event which causes stress and trauma for all concerned. Widely accepted and current management of shoulder dystocia involves performing a set of manoeuvres described in the HELPERR mnemonic, which are taught in emergency obstetric training sessions. This qualitative interpretive study presents a descriptive and hermeneutic analysis of the narratives of five clinicians who have significant experience in the management of shoulder dystocia. The qualitative descriptive approach is informed by the work of Sandelowski and it incorporates a hermeneutic ‘hue’ influenced by the work of Heidegger. This approach allowed themes to be identified from straight description. The data was then further analysed using the hermeneutic approach, to bring forth the richness and meaning of the participants’ experiences. This research approach facilitated a comprehensive analysis of the data. The findings of this research are that the management of shoulder dystocia has been influenced by HELPERR, so that practitioners most commonly follow the sequence of the mnemonic, despite the fact that some of the manoeuvres are difficult to perform or remember. Alongside this, the research shows that through their experiences, practitioners have discovered by ‘accident’ the manoeuvre of axillary traction. They find this manoeuvre not only more effective, but easier to perform in any circumstance. Another important finding of this research is that there are improved neonatal outcomes when axillary traction is the method of choice for resolving shoulder dystocia. In addition, the research highlights that practitioners who are involved with shoulder dystocia, particularly when the outcome is poor, are at risk of suffering post-traumatic stress and psychological damage, which can result in loss of the practitioner from the profession. In these ways, this research has contributed to the body of knowledge of shoulder dystocia, and more importantly, provides an alternative and effective strategy for managing shoulder dystocia.

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