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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Implementing and Comparing Image Convolution Methods on an FPGA at the Register-Transfer Level

Hernandez, Anna C 13 August 2019 (has links)
Whether it's capturing a car's license plate on the highway or detecting someone's facial features to tag friends, computer vision and image processing have found their way into many facets of our lives. Image and video processing algorithms ultimately tailor towards one of two goals: to analyze data and produce output in as close to real-time as possible, or to take in and operate on large swaths of information offline. Image convolution is a mathematical method with which we can filter an image to highlight or make clearer desired information. The most popular uses of image convolution accentuate edges, corners, and facial features for analysis. The goal of this project was to investigate various image convolution algorithms and compare them in terms of hardware usage, power utilization, and ability to handle substantial amounts of data in a reasonable amount of time. The algorithms were designed, simulated, and synthesized for the Zynq-7000 FPGA, selected both for its flexibility and low power consumption.
2

Ensuring Trust Of Third-Party Hardware Design With Constrained Sequential Equivalence Checking

Shrestha, Gyanendra 25 October 2012 (has links)
Globalization of semiconductor design and manufacturing has led to a concern of trust in the final product. The components may now be designed and manufactured from anywhere in the world without the direct supervision of the buyer. As a result, the hardware designs and fabricated chips may be vulnerable to malicious alterations by an adversary at any stage of VLSI design flow, thus compromising the integrity of the component. The effect of any modifications made by the adversary can be catastrophic in the critical applications. Because of the stealthy nature of such insertions, it is extremely difficult to detect them using traditional testing and verification methods. Therefore, the trust of the hardware systems require a new approach and have drawn much attention in the hardware security community. For many years, the researchers have developed sophisticated techniques to detect, isolate and prevent malicious attacks in cyber security community assuming that the underlying hardware platform is extremely secure and trustworthy. But the hardware may contain one or more backdoors that can be exploited by software at the time of operation. Therefore, the trust of the computing system cannot be guaranteed unless we can guarantee the trust of the hardware platform. A malicious insertion can be very stealthy and may only involve minor modification in the hardware design or the fabricated chip. The insertion may require rare or specific conditions in order to be activated. The effect may be denial of service, change of function, destruction of chip, leakage of secret information from cryptographic hardware etc. In this thesis, we propose a novel technique for the detection of malicious alteration(s) in a third party soft intellectual property (IP) using a clever combination of sequential equivalence checking (SEC) and automatic test generation. The use of powerful inductive invariants can prune a large illegal state space, and test generation helps to provide a sensitization path for nodes of interest. Results for a set of hard-to-verify designs show that our method can either ensure that the suspect design is free from the functional effect of any malicious change(s) or return a small group of most likely malicious signals. / Master of Science
3

Increasing Branch Coverage with Dual Metric RTL Test Generation

Bansal, Kunal 02 August 2018 (has links)
In this thesis, we present a new register-transfer level (RTL) test generation method that makes use of two coverage metrics, Branch Coverage, and Mutation Coverage across two stages, to cover hard-to-reach points previously unreached. We start with a preprocessing stage by converting the RTL source to a C++ equivalent using a modified Verilator, which also automatically creates mutants and the corresponding mutated C++ design, based on arithmetic, logical and relational operators during conversion. With the help of extracted Data Dependency and Control Flow Graphs, in every <golden, mutation> pair, branches containing variables dependent on the mutated statement are instrumented to track them. The first stage uses Evolutionary algorithms with Ant Colony Optimization to generate test vectors with mutation coverage as the metric. Two new filtering techniques are also proposed which optimize the first stage by eliminating the need for generating tests for redundant mutants. The next stage is the original BEACON which now takes the generated mutation test vectors as the initial population unlike random vectors, and output final test vectors. These test vectors succeed in improving the coverage up to 70%, compared to the previous approaches for most of the ITC99 benchmarks. With the application of filtering techniques, we also observed a speedup by 85% in the test generation runtime and also up to 78% reduction in test vector size when compared with those generated by the previous techniques. / MS / In the recent years, Verification has become one of the major bottlenecks in integrated circuit design process, which is exacerbated by the increasing design complexities today. Today designers start the design process by abstracting the initial design in a manner similar to software programming language using a higher abstraction language called Hardware Descriptive Language(HDL). Hence, an HDL based design also contains a number of case statements and if-else statements, also called branches, similar to a software design. Branches indicate decision points in the design and high branch coverage based tests can give us an assurance that the design is properly exercised as compared to those given by randomly generated tests. In this thesis, we introduce a new test generation methodology which generates tests using the help of user introduced mutants to ensure higher branch coverage. Mutation testing is similar to a fault testing method, in which an error or a fault is deliberately introduced into the design and we check if the tests generated are able to detect the fault. An important property of a mutant is that: when a mutant is applied and if the mutated part of the design is exercised by the given test suite, then the following data and control flow path taken can be different from that taken on the original design. This important property along with proper guidance is used in our work to reach some branches which are difficult to cover by random test vectors, and this is the main basis of this thesis. Applying this method, we observed that the branch coverage increased with a decrease in test generation runtime and test vector length when compared to previously proposed techniques.
4

An Accessible Project 25 Receiver Using Low-Cost Software Defined Radio

Koch, Mick V. 21 September 2016 (has links)
No description available.
5

High Level Debugging Techniques for Modern Verification Flows

Poulos, Zissis Paraskevas 04 July 2014 (has links)
Early closure to functional correctness of the final chip has become a crucial success factor in the semiconductor industry. In this context, the tedious task of functional debugging poses a significant bottleneck in modern electronic design processes, where new problems related to debugging are constantly introduced and predominantly performed manually. This dissertation proposes methodologies that address two emerging debugging problems in modern design flows. First, it proposes a novel and automated triage framework for Register-Transfer-Level (RTL) debugging. The proposed framework employs clustering techniques to automate the grouping of a plethora of failures that occur during regression verification. Experiments demonstrate accuracy improvements of up to 40% compared to existing triage methodologies. Next, it introduces new techniques for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) debugging that leverage reconfigurability to allow debugging to operate without iterative executions of computationally-intensive design re-synthesis tools. Experiments demonstrate productivity improvements of up to 30 x vs. conventional approaches.
6

Use of Rainbow Trout Liver Cell Line (RTL-W1) to evaluate the toxicity of Heavy Fuel Oil 7102

Chen, Ci January 2013 (has links)
A rainbow trout liver cell line, RTL-W1, was used to evaluate the toxic potential of a heavy fuel oil (HFO) HFO 7102, and its fractions, which together with the HFO are referred to as the oil samples. The fractions were F2, F3, F3-1, F3-2 and F4 and had been prepared by low-temperature vacuum distillation by collaborators at Queen's University. For presentation to the cells, HFO 7102 and its fractions were made into High Energy-Chemically Enhanced Water Accommodated Fractions (HE-CEWAFs). The procedure for this involved adding Corexit 9500 to the oil samples, mixing them on a vortex, and letting the phases settle. The HE-CEWAFs were added to RTL-W1 cell cultures, and at various times afterwards cell viability and CYP1A induction were monitored. Cell viability was evaluated with two dyes, Alamar Blue, which monitors energy metabolism, and 5-carboxfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA AM), which measures plasma membrane integrity. With both indicator dyes, Corexit 9500 was cytotoxic but the concentrations eliciting cytotoxicity varied with the cell culture media. In Leibovitz's L-15 with fetal bovine serum (FBS), which was the medium used for studying CYP1A induction, Corexit 9500 was only cytotoxic at concentrations of 0.1 % (v/v) and greater. For the oil samples, F3-2 at 1 mg/ml and F4 at 10 mg/ml, which were the highest testable concentrations for each, no loss of cell viability was observed over 24 h. The other oil samples were cytotoxic only at their highest testable concentrations, which ended being between 1 and 10 mg/ml. CYP1A induction was monitored in RTL-W1 as catalytic activity and as the level of CYP1A (P4501A) protein. The catalytic activity was assayed as 7-ethoxyresorufin o-deethylase (EROD) activity; the CYP1A protein level, by western blotting. The positive control was 2, 3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which strongly induced both EROD activity and CYP1A protein. Corexit 9500 by itself neither induced EROD activity nor CYP1A protein. All the oil samples induced both EROD activity and CYP1A protein. With both endpoints, the most potent fraction was F3; the least potent, F3-2. As the induction of CYP1A is associated with the development of blue sac disease (BSD) and mortality in early life stages of fish, the results suggest that HFO 7102 and its fractions have the potential to reduce recruitment of young into adult fish populations. CYP1A induction by F3 was studied further, again through EROD activity and western blotting. As the F3 concentration was increased, EROD activity increased but declined at high concentrations, whereas CYP1A protein continued to increase. This suggests the presence of compounds in F3 that at high concentrations inhibit the catalytic activity of CYP1A. When F3 was presented to RTL-W1 cultures together with TCDD, CYP1A protein was induced but not EROD activity. Again this suggests that F3 contains inhibitor(s) of CYP1A as well as inducers. When cultures were exposed to either F3 or TCDD for 24 h and then followed by western blotting for up to 6 days after F3 or TCDD removal, CYP1A levels declined in F3 cultures but not in TCDD cultures. This suggests that RTL-W1 were able to inactivate CYP1A inducer(s) in F3 through metabolism. Overall the results suggest that the pattern of CYP1A induction by F3, and by extension, HFO involves complex interactions between the many chemical components in these mixtures. Likely the most important chemicals are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
7

Use of Rainbow Trout Liver Cell Line (RTL-W1) to evaluate the toxicity of Heavy Fuel Oil 7102

Chen, Ci January 2013 (has links)
A rainbow trout liver cell line, RTL-W1, was used to evaluate the toxic potential of a heavy fuel oil (HFO) HFO 7102, and its fractions, which together with the HFO are referred to as the oil samples. The fractions were F2, F3, F3-1, F3-2 and F4 and had been prepared by low-temperature vacuum distillation by collaborators at Queen's University. For presentation to the cells, HFO 7102 and its fractions were made into High Energy-Chemically Enhanced Water Accommodated Fractions (HE-CEWAFs). The procedure for this involved adding Corexit 9500 to the oil samples, mixing them on a vortex, and letting the phases settle. The HE-CEWAFs were added to RTL-W1 cell cultures, and at various times afterwards cell viability and CYP1A induction were monitored. Cell viability was evaluated with two dyes, Alamar Blue, which monitors energy metabolism, and 5-carboxfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA AM), which measures plasma membrane integrity. With both indicator dyes, Corexit 9500 was cytotoxic but the concentrations eliciting cytotoxicity varied with the cell culture media. In Leibovitz's L-15 with fetal bovine serum (FBS), which was the medium used for studying CYP1A induction, Corexit 9500 was only cytotoxic at concentrations of 0.1 % (v/v) and greater. For the oil samples, F3-2 at 1 mg/ml and F4 at 10 mg/ml, which were the highest testable concentrations for each, no loss of cell viability was observed over 24 h. The other oil samples were cytotoxic only at their highest testable concentrations, which ended being between 1 and 10 mg/ml. CYP1A induction was monitored in RTL-W1 as catalytic activity and as the level of CYP1A (P4501A) protein. The catalytic activity was assayed as 7-ethoxyresorufin o-deethylase (EROD) activity; the CYP1A protein level, by western blotting. The positive control was 2, 3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which strongly induced both EROD activity and CYP1A protein. Corexit 9500 by itself neither induced EROD activity nor CYP1A protein. All the oil samples induced both EROD activity and CYP1A protein. With both endpoints, the most potent fraction was F3; the least potent, F3-2. As the induction of CYP1A is associated with the development of blue sac disease (BSD) and mortality in early life stages of fish, the results suggest that HFO 7102 and its fractions have the potential to reduce recruitment of young into adult fish populations. CYP1A induction by F3 was studied further, again through EROD activity and western blotting. As the F3 concentration was increased, EROD activity increased but declined at high concentrations, whereas CYP1A protein continued to increase. This suggests the presence of compounds in F3 that at high concentrations inhibit the catalytic activity of CYP1A. When F3 was presented to RTL-W1 cultures together with TCDD, CYP1A protein was induced but not EROD activity. Again this suggests that F3 contains inhibitor(s) of CYP1A as well as inducers. When cultures were exposed to either F3 or TCDD for 24 h and then followed by western blotting for up to 6 days after F3 or TCDD removal, CYP1A levels declined in F3 cultures but not in TCDD cultures. This suggests that RTL-W1 were able to inactivate CYP1A inducer(s) in F3 through metabolism. Overall the results suggest that the pattern of CYP1A induction by F3, and by extension, HFO involves complex interactions between the many chemical components in these mixtures. Likely the most important chemicals are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
8

HARDWARE DESCRIPTION LANGUAGE PROGRAM SLICING AND WAY TO REDUCE BOUNDED MODEL CHECKING SEARCH OVERHEAD

Ou, Jen-Chieh January 2007 (has links)
No description available.
9

TV-Design als wichtiger Faktor für Programmverbindungen im deutschen Fernsehen Analysen und Vergleich zwischen den Vollprogrammsendern RTL, ProSieben und dem Spartensender VIVA zur Ermittlung von designerischen Grundsätzen im Fernsehen /

Motschull, Jan Even. January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Wuppertal, Universiẗat, Diss., 2005.
10

Vaizdų atpažinimo sistemos projektavimas ir tyrimas / Image processing system design and analysis

Jonutis, Vytautas, Jaraminas, Mindaugas 11 August 2008 (has links)
Darbe analizuojamas vaizdo apdorojimo sistemos modelis, kuris yra modeliuojamas. Pradinė modelio specifikacija yra aprašoma funkciniame lygyje. Modelio architektūrai modeliuoti mes naudojame transakcijų lygio SystemC, naudodamiesi ja mes galime greitai ir patogiai nustatyti, kokia turėtų būti modeliuojamos sistemos architektūra. Funkcinis modelis yra transformuojamas į sisteminį lygį naudojantis SystemC transakcijų modeliavimo kalba. Naudojantis pradine specifikacija ir TLM modeliu pereiname prie sintezuojamo aprašo. Transformuodami pradinį modelį aukštame abstrakcijos lygyje, mes sprendžiame sistemos architektūros problemą. Transformuodami aukšto lygio modelį į SystemC sintezuojamą aprašą, mes sprendžiame kintamųjų ir algoritmų transformavimo problemas. / In this work we analyzing video preprocessing system model. Primary model specifications are described in functional level. It is hard to decide what system architecture should be, so we used SystemC TLM modeling language, because it gives us easier way to change system architecture Using SystemC transaction level modeling (TLM) the functional primary specification are transformed from functional model to system level. To get synthesizable model we use primary specification and TLM model. We solve many system architecture problems while we where working on primary model transformation to high abstraction system. Transforming high abstraction level model to SystemC synthesizable code we solve variables selection problems and algorithms conversation problem.

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