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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Concept of Rebelliosness of Negroes and Whites

Sarantopoulos, George A. 05 1900 (has links)
The problem investigated in this paper is the concept of rebelliousness, especially as it applies to two racial groups, Negroes and Whites.
2

Racial Differences in Job Satisfaction: An Explanatory Model

Rodriguez, Jennifer Marie 2009 December 1900 (has links)
Using meta-analysis, the current paper reveals a modest difference between Black and White employees in terms of job satisfaction (d = -0.13; k = 65; N = 29,560). Several potential moderators of this relationship were investigated, but only two were supported: the proportion of Black employees in the organization and historical time period (i.e., year of publication and year of data collection). Specifically, Black employees tend to be relatively more satisfied when their proportional representation is larger and White employees have tended to be relatively more satisfied than Black employees over the years, with maximal White advantage occurring at the present day. This study further attempts to investigate race effects on job satisfaction through mediational analysis, with job complexity as the mediator. This analysis at the individual level does not support job complexity as a mediator. Further analyses involving race and job complexity at the job level of analysis show promise but are not fleshed out in detail. Results are discussed in light of both the job characteristics model and frame-of-reference (Cornell model) explanations for the origin of job satisfaction.
3

THE NEGLECT OF RACIAL RESPONSIVITY: AN EXAMINATION OF WHY RACE MATTERS IN CORRECTIONAL TREATMENT

SPIROPOULOS, GEORGIA V. 12 July 2007 (has links)
No description available.
4

ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION RELATED TO FUEL EXPOSURE AMONGST WOMEN IN THE MILITARY AND RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN ENDOCRINE LEVELS

Reutman, Susan Simpson 11 October 2001 (has links)
No description available.
5

Racial (Black-White) Variability for College Students on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

Maiden, Roy C. 05 1900 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to determine if there were significant differences between Black and white students on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in an integrated university, and to determine if these differences are consistent with findings in past research. In this study, socio-economic status, which has been suspected as the cause for racial variability, was statistically controlled.
6

The influence of different types of barrier creams on skin barrier function / Sonette du Plessis

Du Plessis, Sonette January 2012 (has links)
Aims and objectives: The research aims and objectives of this study were: Firstly to determine the positive effects and possible disadvantages of three types of barrier creams on skin barrier function by determining skin barrier function by measuring stratum corneum hydration transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin surface pH. Secondly to compare different racial skin types (African skin to Caucasian skin) by determining the effects of barrier cream on skin barrier function. Finally to compare the effect of the three different barrier creams on four different anatomical areas. Methods: Thirty eight non-smoking male test subjects took part in this study where three different types of barrier creams were tested on their arms and hands in a controlled laboratory environment. The thirty eight test subjects consisted of nineteen African and nineteen Caucasian test subjects. Three parameters were measured namely TEWL, stratum corneum hydration and pH condition of the skin. TEWL was measured using a Vapometer (Delfin Technology Ltd. Finland). The Multi probe Adapter system (MPA) (Courage and Khazaka, Germany) was used with a temperature and humidity sensor and with the following probes all from Courage and Khazaka, Germany: a Corneometer measuring skin hydration and a pH-Meter measuring skin surface pH. The measurements were repeated on each of the four sampling areas (forearm, wrist, back of hand and palm) with a reasonable time interval between each measurement. After the baseline measurement the barrier cream was applied by the researcher on the test subjects’ dominant arm. The long term effects were determined after the baseline measurement in intervals of 2 hours. Directly after each measurement the barrier cream was reapplied. Results: Gloves In A Bottle™ increased stratum corneum hydration, had no effect on TEWL and increased skin surface pH, whereas Reinol™ increased stratum corneum hydration and decreased TEWL and had no effect on pH values. Travabon™ decreased stratum corneum hydration and TEWL and had no effect on skin surface pH. The results indicated that there were significant differences between Caucasian and African test subjects with the use of barrier creams, because of the baseline differences and the reaction to barrier creams showed different results. There were also statistically significant differences in the four different anatomical areas where the barrier creams were applied. Conclusion: Barrier creams are beneficial in the workplace, although it should be taken into consideration that different ethnicities react differently to barrier creams under different workplace situations and therefore this should be taken into account when selecting a barrier cream. / Thesis (MSc (Occupational Hygiene))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2013
7

The influence of different types of barrier creams on skin barrier function / Sonette du Plessis

Du Plessis, Sonette January 2012 (has links)
Aims and objectives: The research aims and objectives of this study were: Firstly to determine the positive effects and possible disadvantages of three types of barrier creams on skin barrier function by determining skin barrier function by measuring stratum corneum hydration transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin surface pH. Secondly to compare different racial skin types (African skin to Caucasian skin) by determining the effects of barrier cream on skin barrier function. Finally to compare the effect of the three different barrier creams on four different anatomical areas. Methods: Thirty eight non-smoking male test subjects took part in this study where three different types of barrier creams were tested on their arms and hands in a controlled laboratory environment. The thirty eight test subjects consisted of nineteen African and nineteen Caucasian test subjects. Three parameters were measured namely TEWL, stratum corneum hydration and pH condition of the skin. TEWL was measured using a Vapometer (Delfin Technology Ltd. Finland). The Multi probe Adapter system (MPA) (Courage and Khazaka, Germany) was used with a temperature and humidity sensor and with the following probes all from Courage and Khazaka, Germany: a Corneometer measuring skin hydration and a pH-Meter measuring skin surface pH. The measurements were repeated on each of the four sampling areas (forearm, wrist, back of hand and palm) with a reasonable time interval between each measurement. After the baseline measurement the barrier cream was applied by the researcher on the test subjects’ dominant arm. The long term effects were determined after the baseline measurement in intervals of 2 hours. Directly after each measurement the barrier cream was reapplied. Results: Gloves In A Bottle™ increased stratum corneum hydration, had no effect on TEWL and increased skin surface pH, whereas Reinol™ increased stratum corneum hydration and decreased TEWL and had no effect on pH values. Travabon™ decreased stratum corneum hydration and TEWL and had no effect on skin surface pH. The results indicated that there were significant differences between Caucasian and African test subjects with the use of barrier creams, because of the baseline differences and the reaction to barrier creams showed different results. There were also statistically significant differences in the four different anatomical areas where the barrier creams were applied. Conclusion: Barrier creams are beneficial in the workplace, although it should be taken into consideration that different ethnicities react differently to barrier creams under different workplace situations and therefore this should be taken into account when selecting a barrier cream. / Thesis (MSc (Occupational Hygiene))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2013
8

Ethnic and Racial Differences in Emotion Perception

Cheng, Linda 10 October 2007 (has links)
This study analyzed racial differences in the way African Americans and Caucasians perceive emotion from facial expressions and tone of voice. Participants were African American (n=25) and Caucasian (n=26) college students. The study utilizes 56 images of African American and Caucasian faces balanced for race and sex from the NimStim stimulus set (Tottenham, 2006). The study also utilized visual and auditory stimuli form the DANVA2. Participants were asked to judged emotion for each stimulus in the tasks. The BFRT, the WASI, and the Seashore Rhythm test were used as exclusionary criteria. In general the study found few differences in the way African Americans and Caucasians perceived emotion, though racial differences emerged as an interaction with other factors. The results of the study supported the theory of universality of emotion perception and expression though social influences, which may affect emotion perception, is also a possibility. Areas of future research were discussed.
9

Predictors of Cognitive Decline in a Multi-Ethnic Sample of Midlife Women: A Longitudinal Study

Dixon, Jasmine 01 February 2020 (has links)
Hypertension, diabetes, depressive symptoms, and smoking are predictors of cognitive decline in late life. However, it is not known if these risk factors are associated with cognition during midlife orif the associations between these risk factors and cognition vary by race. This longitudinal study hypothesized that (1) the risk factors would predict cognitive decline in midlife, (2)African Americans would have greater cognitive decline than European Americans and East Asians, and (3) there would be stronger associations between risk factors and cognition for African American women compared to European American and East Asian women. Participants (aged 42-52) were European American (n= 1,000), African American (n= 516), and East Asian (n= 437) women from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation who were studied for 8 years. Risk factors (i.e., diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and depressive symptoms) and cognitive outcomes (i.e., episodic memory, processing speed, and working memory) were measured at multiple timepoints. Two-level hierarchical linear models tested change in cognition over time controlling for income, education, and age. African Americans had lower scores than European Americans and East Asians on all cognitive outcomes. East Asian smokers had greater episodic memory decline compared to European American smokers. Depressive symptoms did not adversely impact processing speed for East Asian relative to European Americans. Contrary to our hypothesis, hypertension was associated with improved processing speed over time for African Americans compared to European Americans. Racial disparities in cognition were evident for African American women.
10

Examining differential relationships of substance use and risky sexual behavior among African American and white adolescents

Banks, Devin E. 01 November 2016 (has links)
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) / Adolescents are at disproportionate risk for health consequences associated with risky sexual behavior (RSB), including sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy. Racial disparities have also been observed with African American adolescents experiencing higher rates of such negative health outcomes than their White peers. Substance use, particularly alcohol and marijuana use, has been shown to predict RSB among adolescents of both racial groups. However, research suggests that alcohol use is more predictive of RSB in White adolescents than African American adolescents, perhaps due to significantly higher rates of alcohol use among White adolescents. Given recent trends indicating higher rates of marijuana use among African American adolescents than their White peers and a strong association between marijuana use and RSB among African American adolescents, marijuana use may better explain the relationship between substance use and risky sexual behavior among African Americans than alcohol use. Thus, the current study examined whether alcohol and marijuana use have differential effects on adolescent RSB by race at the event- and global-level of analysis. To that end, 113 adolescents ages 14-18 (African American = 93, White=20) completed self-report measures of substance use and RSB. Contrary to hypotheses, results revealed no racial differences in the relationship between substance use and RSB. However, post-hoc analyses revealed that marijuana use significantly predicted frequency of sex among African American adolescents above the effects of alcohol. These findings indicate that previously documented racial differences in the relationship between substance use and RSB may not be accounted for by marijuana use, but suggest that future studies continue to examine the unique impact of marijuana use on RSB, particularly among African American adolescents.

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