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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Analysis of recovery knowledge and attitudes among graduate school faculty /

Stonger, Judith Ann, January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.) -- Central Connecticut State University, 2009. / Thesis advisor: Marc Goldstein. "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 29-31). Also available via the World Wide Web.
2

Narrative approaches to recovery-oriented psychotherapy with individuals with schizophrenia a project based upon an independent investigation /

Marlowe, Michelle Hart. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.W.)--Smith College School for Social Work, Northampton, Mass., 2009. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 62-68).
3

Understanding and preaching about recovery from a twelve step perspective

Young, Sarah Marie. January 2006 (has links)
Project (D. Min.)--Iliff School of Theology, 2006. / Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-109).
4

The experience of recovery from schizophrenia development of a definition, model and measure of recovery /

Andresen, Retta. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Wollongong, 2007. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references: p. 239-275.
5

Understanding and preaching about recovery from a twelve step perspective

Young, Sarah Marie. January 1900 (has links)
Project (D. Min.)--Iliff School of Theology, 2006. / Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-109).
6

The transformational healing journey from universal shame : a phenomenological-grounded theory inquiry

Onslow, Christopher E, University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education January 2009 (has links)
A phenomenological-grounded theory methodology was utilized to explore the transformational healing journeys of five Caucasian men in recovery from pervasive shame in their lives. An overview of several western approaches to treating shame are included, as well as two predominant Universal Developmental theories of shame and its link to the resolution of narcissism. During the thematic analysis of the interviews, thirteen themes were derived, which constituted a chronological depiction of the story of shame, as it unfolded in the lives of the participants. Additionally, an in-depth look at the families of origin, and the beginnings of shame in the participants’ lives is presented, as well as a picture of how their lives are now, after recovery from their shame. Implications for counseling were addressed. / ix, 196 leaves ; 29 cm
7

Peer Support Groups For Substance Misuse: Understanding Engagement With the Group

Sotskova, Alina 25 August 2014 (has links)
Peer support groups (PSGs) for addiction recovery are the most common source for aftercare services once professional treatment has ended (Cloud, Rowan, Wulff, & Golder, 2007), and a significant number of individuals who seek help for a substance-related problem only seek that help from peer support organizations, such as Alcoholics Anonymous (White, 2010). In the last two decades, a different, more secular culture of “recovery” from self-defined problematic substance has led to the emergence of new PSGs (White, 2009). However, very few research studies to date have examined how more recent, typically secular, PSGs work, what aspects of them attract participants, and what participants find helpful about the group. Further, very little is known whether theories that have been applied to clinical treatment, such as the Stages of Change model, relate to the peer support environment. LifeRing is a secular PSG that views substance misuse as a learned habit that can be changed through taking responsibility for one’s actions and actively engaging with peers (Nicolaus, 2009). A particularly relevant model to LifeRing is Stages of Change, because LifeRing encourages personal responsibility and choice, does not prescribe any specific steps, and encourages individuals to build their own recovery plan that can help them stay motivated in recovery (Nicolaus, 2009). The current study examined data from 50 participants that attend LifeRing meetings on Vancouver Island. The results were not consistent with the Stages of Change framework. 4 Specifically, readiness to change and active group participation did not predict group engagement outcomes. Analysis of open-ended follow-up questions indicate that group cohesion and match in beliefs were significantly associated with greater active group participation and convenor alliance was significantly associated with group satisfaction, paralleling findings on the topic in the psychotherapy literature. Information from qualitative follow-up questions regarding helpful and unhelpful aspects of LifeRing are also discussed. / Graduate / avsotskova@gmail.com
8

Evaluating the Effects of NAMI's Consumer Presentation Entitled In Our Own Voice

Brennan, Madeline 12 July 2013 (has links)
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) / Research suggests that misperceptions about the mentally ill and about their ability to recover and live productive lives are still commonly held by the public. Psychoeducation programs and direct contact can help both correct misperceptions and offer encouraging messages about recovery in those with and without mental illness. Consumer presentation programs, such as NAMI’s In Our Own Voice (IOOV), were designed in part for these purposes. This study examined archival IOOV audience evaluations (n = 599) from 2009 to better understand how audiences respond to IOOV in natural settings. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted to examine: 1) viewers’ responses to the program, 2) differences between consumer and nonconsumer responses, and 3) whether the program satisfies program goals for audience members. Results indicate that the majority of viewers respond positively, in a variety of ways and to a variety of program elements not previously identified. Additionally, the program’s effects appear to generalize across consumers and nonconsumers equally well, with the exception that nonconsumers more frequently reported finding the program educational and consumers more frequently reported personally relating to presenters. Finally, results suggest that IOOV is indeed meeting its two stated program goals for audience members: educating the public and offering a hope-inspiring message of recovery. In conclusion, IOOV, as it is performed in the field, appears to be a valuable addition to educational and inspiring recovery-oriented programming available to the public.

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