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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Adults’ Perceptions of their Childhood Media Role Models

Erlandson, Kayley Karen January 2014 (has links)
The media’s effects on children have been frequently discussed, but the effects that childhood media has when individuals reach adulthood is not fully understood. Current research in this area has mostly focused on present day media figures, not past role models. Studying media role models retroactively shows the power of messages that people receive when they are children. This study used data collected from 18 undergraduate students through interviews (6 males, 12 females) to investigate three research questions regarding gender’s role in choosing a media role model, the articulation of gender identity during discussion of media role models, and how assessments of childhood media role models change over time. Findings that could lead to potential future research include the underlying hegemonic masculinity, where men are accessing their power in society through fictional characters’ masculine traits, and the influence of shared experience of media when choosing a childhood media role model.
2

Do Stressed Female Role Models Hinder Women’s Interest in Male-Dominated Domains?

January 2019 (has links)
archives@tulane.edu / The current study is designed to test whether a stressed-out female role model in a male-dominated domain hinders women’s career aspirations. Role models have been shown to increase women’s career interest in fields where they are underrepresented. This study, however, sought to establish that role model stress in male-dominated domains is threatening to aspirant women’s career achievement. Female pre-medical undergraduates read about either a stressed or non-stressed female physician (the role model) who works in either a male-dominated or gender-equal work environment. There were no significant changes on pre-med career interest over time. However, participants reported that their interest in a career in medicine decreased as a result of listening to an interview with a stressed role model. Unexpectedly, participants listening to a stressed role model performed better on an in-lab task. The male-dominated domain did not induce the same threat effects as it has in past studies, but this independent variable was not without consequence as participants in the gender-equal domain condition performed better on a creative thinking exercise. This study demonstrates that stressed-out role models do impact individuals looking up to them, but it may not be enough to deter new aspirants from their intended career paths. / 1 / Sally Merritt
3

The study of female role models in adolescent literature /

Dudko, Robert. January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Central Connecticut State University, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 93-94).
4

Application of the modeling role-modeling theory to mentoring in nursing

Lamb, Patricia Darlene. January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M. Nursing)--Montana State University--Bozeman, 2005. / Typescript. Chairperson, Graduate Committee: M. Jean Shreffler-Grant. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 47-50).
5

Can a hard-working female role model counter STEM-requires-brilliance stereotypes and spark girls’ engagement with STEM?

January 2021 (has links)
specialcollections@tulane.edu / The gender gap in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) professions results from several factors that deter females from pursuing careers in STEM. Girls’ low interest in science and lack of feeling both belonging and efficacy in science, which emerge as early as middle school, are believed to be part of the problem. This study reports on a novel intervention designed to spark middle school girls’ engagement in science. A diverse group of middle school girls participating in a science outreach event read about a female Black astronaut whose accomplishments were framed either as a result of hard work (growth mindset) or natural abilities (fixed mindset). Participants responded to an open-ended prompt that asked them if they wanted to be an astronaut like the role model and then answered a series of scale measures about science. It was hypothesized that girls in the growth mindset condition would endorse stronger interest, belonging, and efficacy in science, indicate a desire to be an astronaut, and explain that desire in ways that indicated similarity with the role model and alignment with their mindset condition. No significant differences were observed/emerged between the two conditions and exploratory analyses found no interaction between race and condition. Possible reasons for the null findings are discussed, including issues related to mindset manipulation and the strength and specificity of the intervention. Characteristics of the sample were also considered, including participants’ above mid-point science interest and belonging, both of which were positively related to desire to be an astronaut. This research provides insights into the complexities that need to be considered when designing an intervention to increase interest, belonging, and self-efficacy in STEM. / 1 / Sally Merritt
6

Patients’ Perceptions of Nurses as Role Models of Healthy Behaviors

Baker, Sarah C. 01 May 2016 (has links)
Nurses are caregivers who are instrumental in improving patient outcomes through providing hands-on care and health education. In addition to performing prescribed interventions and providing instruction to patients, nurses can also have a positive impact by modeling healthy behaviors for their patients (Blake & Harrison, 2012). Nurses educate patients on the importance of maintaining healthy habits such as eating well, getting enough sleep and exercise, and avoiding alcohol and drug use; however, studies demonstrate that nurses have similar difficulty maintaining healthy lifestyles as the general population’s and in some cases are even more prone to develop problems with unhealthy habits. This discrepancy in knowledge versus behaviors may be due to high levels of occupational stress, struggles with balancing life and work, and added strain from working extended shifts (Marchiondo, 2014). This perceived discrepancy may negatively impact the patient-nurse relationship as patients may be less likely to follow the health advice of someone who does not appear to apply their own recommendations for healthy living (Zapka, Lemon, Magner, & Hale, 2009). Exploring how the patient views the nurse’s role is critical to determining if patients perceive nurses as one dimensional in their role as caregivers or if nurses’ care and personal appearances or behaviors impact patient health, care, and wellness. The results may identify a barrier to treatment requiring additional education for nurses regarding expanded role development and improving patient health.
7

The discourses of male teachers : the role of literate identity in professional practice

Welch, Shannon Rae 11 March 2009
The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which the primary Discourse and school experiences inform the literate identity of a male teacher, as well as his professional practice. The research looks at the various influences and relationships that come to bear on male literate identity from childhood to professional practice. As well, it responds to the contention of the popular media that boys lagging literacies might be remediated through the presence of more male literacy role models in the classroom. This study suggests that although role models may be influential under particular circumstances, the development of literate identity is far more complex and nuanced.<p> This study focuses on six male teachers and describes their experiences of literacy, particularly reading, from childhood into professional practice. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and informal observations. The interviews revealed that male literate identity is a product not only of parental attitudes toward literacy, but it is also determined by the individuals sense of competence and purpose, as well as sometimes serendipitous encounters with other readers.
8

The discourses of male teachers : the role of literate identity in professional practice

Welch, Shannon Rae 11 March 2009 (has links)
The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which the primary Discourse and school experiences inform the literate identity of a male teacher, as well as his professional practice. The research looks at the various influences and relationships that come to bear on male literate identity from childhood to professional practice. As well, it responds to the contention of the popular media that boys lagging literacies might be remediated through the presence of more male literacy role models in the classroom. This study suggests that although role models may be influential under particular circumstances, the development of literate identity is far more complex and nuanced.<p> This study focuses on six male teachers and describes their experiences of literacy, particularly reading, from childhood into professional practice. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and informal observations. The interviews revealed that male literate identity is a product not only of parental attitudes toward literacy, but it is also determined by the individuals sense of competence and purpose, as well as sometimes serendipitous encounters with other readers.
9

"They're All Sort of Fake, Not Real": An Exploratory Study of Who Young Girls Look Up To

Wright, Carole Ann January 2008 (has links)
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the phenomenon of role models for younger girls. Girls aged 5 to 12 years were asked who they chose to look up to, how significant their role models were to them, why they had chosen them and if they thought they thought that they could achieve their chosen model‟s achievements. Socio-cultural framework provides a useful perspective for understanding the significance of role models as they act as powerful transmitters and reinforcers of the tenets of socialization. In Social Cognitive Theory, it is claimed that children largely learn through modelling, observing and imitating significant others. Interview and task sessions including a field-mapping activity and the sorting of peer-generated photographs were conducted with 12 girls aged from 5 to 12 years from one urban school. In analysis of the interview data, it was found that family members or family substitutes were the most significant people that these girls chose and, despite the alleged pressure from popular culture, young girls in this study were able to make discerning judgements about the „hollowness‟ of characters of popular culture. They identified skills or attributes that their role models demonstrated rather than physical attractiveness, their popularity or the amount of money their fame had brought them. This study is a valid representation of what mattered to a group of young girls at one specific point in time and could indicate the value of further investigation of how to maximize the benefits of role models for young girls.
10

"They're all sort of fake, not real!" : an exploratory study of who young girls look up to : a dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education in University of Canterbury School of Education Studies and Humanities, EDUC 695 /

Wright, Carole January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M. Ed.)--University of Canterbury, 2008. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 121-127). Also available via the World Wide Web.

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