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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Working on the wild side: The politics of rebel identities, informal economies, and gender through tending bar

January 2019 (has links)
archives@tulane.edu / In the United States, work is a central dimension of adult life and a critical site through which we articulate who we are and who we want to be. Recent economic trends indicate that the middle class is shrinking, bottle-necking more working people into the burgeoning informal economy marked by lower-wages, at-will employment, few benefits, and the loss of collective bargaining rights. This study examines how men and women workers in the informal economy negotiate a sense of self within and through the structures that shape their working lives. Using standpoint theory and institutional ethnographic methodologies, this study explores identity negotiation processes and outcomes through interviews with 40 New Orleans-area bartenders. A comparative analysis between men and women bartenders identifies the rebel worker as an affirmative and self-made occupational identity formed in relationship to structures that produce vulnerability and instability. Identity negotiations among men and among women reveal that ascriptive statuses play a critical role in how work is experienced and navigated—rebel barkeeps and rebel barmaids are the gendered manifestations of workplace self-development projects that are formed in relationship to broader gender hegemonies. Finally, this study analyzes the impact of the rebel worker identity on the non-working lives of bartenders across and within gender statuses to map how the structures that shape our working selves are refracted and implicated within the intimate, non-working dimensions of bartenders’ lives, particularly in bartenders’ negotiations with family life. This study finds that the development of self-made identities is negotiated in relationship to relations of ruling that produce marginalizing effects in bartenders’ lives. The individualization of marginalization results in participants internalizing the outcomes of marginality rather than localizing and politicizing the outcomes of informal economies within broader relations of ruling. Moreover, identity projects through work are not only gendered, but play a central role in workers’ considerations of their opportunity structures beyond the workplace. As the informal economy continues to grow, the entrenchment of instability and vulnerability could play a central role in who Americans think they are and what they believe is possible for their futures. / 1 / Emily Hay Starr
2

Gender-queer Identity and Resistance to Gender Binary in Andrea Gibson's Poetry

Sultan, Hazar January 2015 (has links)
The question of gender, specifically gender identity, is prominent in today’s society. It is highly debated and through the development of queer theory it is gaining more academic recognition. However, there is a gap regarding representation of the gender-queer identity of one contemporary poet, Andrea Gibson. Gibson provides a much needed perspective and voice in society and scholarly debates. This is why this essay uses queer theory along with Kate Bornstein and Judith Butler to examine three poems by Gibson, “Swing-Set, “The Jewelry Store” and “A Genderful Pep-Talk for my Younger Self”. The essay analyses the ways Gibson, through poetry, formulates a gender-queer identity and thus questions the generic gender binary system.
3

Women in Games : Experiences and Attitudes of Female Employees in the Male-dominated Games Industry

REINELÖV, JOSEFIN, ÅHSTRÖM, SARA January 2014 (has links)
Sweden is regularly listed as one of the best countries in the world in terms of gender equality, often portrayed as a role model compared to the rest of the world. However, occupations tend to comprise disproportionately large numbers of women or men. The games industry is no exception, were women represent only 15 per cent of the workforce, of which only a small percentage  of those  actually work with the game production. This implies negative consequences both in terms of business performance and inequality working conditions. This thesis aims to increase the understanding of why there are so few women within the games industry through an investigation of the attitudes and work experiences  among Swedish female game workers. From a gender perspective, the ongoing construction of gendering practices is problematized, drawing on the study of a Swedish game company and interviews with  seventeen female game workers. We found that the general attitudes towards the games industry are positive. The passion for games was the most significant common factor for all women and in general, women expressed a friendly culture and satisfying workplace conditions. However, the analysis of women’s  work experiences revealed that the industry has gender issues, where women are routinely disadvantaged in favor of men. The widespread stereotype that women are just not as interested or just not as good as men, works against them. Women suffer fewer opportunities to advance, particularly in reaching top management positions and homosocial practices occurs in the recruitment  process as well as within the internal jargon. Hence, the gender power structure problematized in this  study, manifest itself through  multiple negative implications for women.
4

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Yu, Hsu-chi 01 July 2008 (has links)
none
5

Hegemony has his hand up again : examining masculinities and resistance when teaching about gender

Moore, Shannon Dawn Maree 11 1900 (has links)
This paper outlines interview based, qualitative research that was conducted with six male youth who were previously students in my Social Studies 11 class. Within two separate, semi-structured interviews, participants were asked to discuss student resistance to anti oppressive pedagogy that focused on gender, and their understanding of masculinities. The initial purpose of this research was to find a relationship, if any, between acts of student resistance and the construction of masculinities. Participant perceptions of masculinities evolved as the dominant theme within the interviews. These discussions revealed that student understandings of masculinity were often entrenched in hegemonic language, yet contradictions were exposed between their rote definitions and personal narratives. Further, the use of media as a discourse became a venue for complicating essentialist understandings of masculinity, and for exposing multiple, fluid, versions of masculinities. Within these discussions of multiplicity, race and sexuality became two intersections of identity that took precedence. Also the intersection of teacher identity and the reading of identity terms emerged as a salient interpretation for gender discussions in the classroom. Throughout this write-up of the research are methodological considerations surrounding power, the construction of masculinity and race, and the further entrenching of heteronormativity, in the form of methodological interludes. Finally, within the conclusion, I consider the implications for practice and future directions for research in masculinities.
6

Hegemony has his hand up again : examining masculinities and resistance when teaching about gender

Moore, Shannon Dawn Maree 11 1900 (has links)
This paper outlines interview based, qualitative research that was conducted with six male youth who were previously students in my Social Studies 11 class. Within two separate, semi-structured interviews, participants were asked to discuss student resistance to anti oppressive pedagogy that focused on gender, and their understanding of masculinities. The initial purpose of this research was to find a relationship, if any, between acts of student resistance and the construction of masculinities. Participant perceptions of masculinities evolved as the dominant theme within the interviews. These discussions revealed that student understandings of masculinity were often entrenched in hegemonic language, yet contradictions were exposed between their rote definitions and personal narratives. Further, the use of media as a discourse became a venue for complicating essentialist understandings of masculinity, and for exposing multiple, fluid, versions of masculinities. Within these discussions of multiplicity, race and sexuality became two intersections of identity that took precedence. Also the intersection of teacher identity and the reading of identity terms emerged as a salient interpretation for gender discussions in the classroom. Throughout this write-up of the research are methodological considerations surrounding power, the construction of masculinity and race, and the further entrenching of heteronormativity, in the form of methodological interludes. Finally, within the conclusion, I consider the implications for practice and future directions for research in masculinities.
7

Gendering Human-Robot Interaction: exploring how a person's gender impacts attitudes toward and interaction with robots

Wang, Yan January 2014 (has links)
Developing an improved understanding and awareness of how gender impacts perceptions of robots and interactions with them is crucial for the ongoing advancement of the human-robot interaction (HRI) field, as a lack of awareness of gender issues increases the risk of robot rejection and poor performance. This thesis provides a theoretical grounding for gender-studies in HRI, and contributes to the understanding of how gender affects attitudes toward and interaction with robots via the findings from an on-line survey and a laboratory user study. We envision that this work will provide HRI designers with a foundation and exemplary account of how gender can influence attitudes toward and interaction with robots, serving as a resource and a sensitizing discussion for gender studies in HRI.
8

THE EFFECTS OF GENDER IN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE GROUPS

Parks, Melissa 10 May 2006 (has links)
This action research study investigated the effects of gender on same and mixed gender elementary school science groups. Qualitative data for this study was collected using surveys, student focus groups, student journals, and teacher-researcher field notes and observations. Students in this study were eager to participate in science groups and demonstrated a positive attitude toward the study of science. Results also showed the types of interactions between boys and girls varied and those interactions affected their science attitude and participation. Recommendations were made for continued research to examine the long-term effects of gender groupings in the elementary science classroom. / M.Ed.; / Department of Educational Research, Technology and Leadership / Education / K-8 Mathematics and Science Education
9

Mother Russia and the Socialist Fatherland: Women and the Communist Party of Canada, 1932-1941, with specific reference to the activism of Dorothy Livesay and Jim Watts

BUTLER, NANCY ELLEN 01 December 2010 (has links)
This dissertation traces a shift in the Communist Party of Canada, from the 1929 to 1935 period of militant class struggle (generally known as the ‘Third Period’) to the 1935-1939 Popular Front Against Fascism, a period in which Communists argued for unity and cooperation with social democrats. The CPC’s appropriation and redeployment of bourgeois gender norms facilitated this shift by bolstering the CPC’s claims to political authority and legitimacy. ‘Woman’ and the gendered interests associated with women—such as peace and prices—became important in the CPC’s war against capitalism. What women represented symbolically, more than who and what women were themselves, became a key element of CPC politics in the Depression decade. Through a close examination of the cultural work of two prominent middle-class female members, Dorothy Livesay, poet, journalist and sometime organizer, and Eugenia (‘Jean’ or ‘Jim’) Watts, reporter, founder of the Theatre of Action, and patron of the Popular Front magazine New Frontier, this thesis utilizes the insights of queer theory, notably those of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Judith Butler, not only to reconstruct both the background and consequences of the CPC’s construction of ‘woman’ in the 1930s, but also to explore the significance of the CPC’s strategic deployment of heteronormative ideas and ideals for these two prominent members of the Party. / Thesis (Ph.D, History) -- Queen's University, 2010-11-30 21:57:57.33
10

Livelihoods and gender: a case study on the coast of Southeastern Brazil

Carpenter, Lydia 20 December 2011 (has links)
This research explores the gendered intra-household livelihood dynamics of one coastal community in Paraty, Brazil. Exploring gender in the livelihoods context addresses the social context of gender roles and relations as they relate to small-scale agriculture, artisanal fishing, tourism and the larger livelihoods picture in one community. Project objectives included: 1) To examine how people in a small coastal community make their livelihood, 2) To analyze the influence of gender roles and relations and the division of labour in livelihood activities and on gender effects within the household or family unit, and 3) To explore prospects for future livelihood diversification sensitive to the influence of gender. Results show that individual and household livelihood portfolios are diverse and are highly dependent on the natural resource base. Gender relations and bargaining power depended on the diversity and type of livelihood activities practiced at the household and on an individual levels.

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