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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Livelihoods and gender: a case study on the coast of Southeastern Brazil

Carpenter, Lydia 20 December 2011 (has links)
This research explores the gendered intra-household livelihood dynamics of one coastal community in Paraty, Brazil. Exploring gender in the livelihoods context addresses the social context of gender roles and relations as they relate to small-scale agriculture, artisanal fishing, tourism and the larger livelihoods picture in one community. Project objectives included: 1) To examine how people in a small coastal community make their livelihood, 2) To analyze the influence of gender roles and relations and the division of labour in livelihood activities and on gender effects within the household or family unit, and 3) To explore prospects for future livelihood diversification sensitive to the influence of gender. Results show that individual and household livelihood portfolios are diverse and are highly dependent on the natural resource base. Gender relations and bargaining power depended on the diversity and type of livelihood activities practiced at the household and on an individual levels.
12

Livelihoods and gender: a case study on the coast of Southeastern Brazil

Carpenter, Lydia 20 December 2011 (has links)
This research explores the gendered intra-household livelihood dynamics of one coastal community in Paraty, Brazil. Exploring gender in the livelihoods context addresses the social context of gender roles and relations as they relate to small-scale agriculture, artisanal fishing, tourism and the larger livelihoods picture in one community. Project objectives included: 1) To examine how people in a small coastal community make their livelihood, 2) To analyze the influence of gender roles and relations and the division of labour in livelihood activities and on gender effects within the household or family unit, and 3) To explore prospects for future livelihood diversification sensitive to the influence of gender. Results show that individual and household livelihood portfolios are diverse and are highly dependent on the natural resource base. Gender relations and bargaining power depended on the diversity and type of livelihood activities practiced at the household and on an individual levels.
13

Critical media analysis of female soldier representation from magazines to Instagram : a cultural studies perspective

Cedillo, Stacia Ann 17 February 2015 (has links)
The purpose of this work is to explore the gendered cultural meanings surrounding female soldier representations found in official print and online military recruiting materials during Global War on Terror (GWOT) period (2001-2014). Using recruitment advertisements found in three popular women’s magazines and on the official Instagram accounts of the U.S. military, three research questions are addressed: 1) What visual and/or textual codes found in female soldier representations are used to construct gendered cultural meanings around women in the military?; 2) How do print and online recruiting materials encourage audiences to co-construct, produce, and distribute these gendered cultural meanings?; and 3) What is the significance of these gendered cultural meanings and audience interactivity/participation in female soldier representations during the GWOT era? A visual analysis of the data was performed using critical media guidelines provided by Luke & Iyer (2011) and Kellner (2015, 2013). The findings of this study suggest that there continue to be underlying, embedded notions of essentialized femininity found in contemporary representations of female soldiers. These findings and military recruiting materials are discussed in relation to broader public discourse around female soldiers and civilian women in society, particularly within important cultural moments of rising fourth-wave feminism and changing patterns of media consumption. In addition, a discussion around the growing need to conceptualize and study audiences as hybridized producers/consumers and as active interpreters of media messages in the digital age is provided. In doing so, this work seeks to understand and recognize the incredible power mass media (particularly social media) audiences have in constructing popular representations of all women. Finally, important implications related to the overwhelming lack of critical gender, media, and military studies in American school-contexts, key sites for military recruiters, are discussed. / text
14

Domesticating modernity : undertsanding women's aspirations in participatory literacy programmes in Uganda

Fiedrich, Marc January 2003 (has links)
Adult education programmes in East Africa have historically combined literacy training with a range of efforts to shape the way African women expressed their femininity and sexuality. Early missionaries believed that literacy together with Victorian ideals of feminine propriety, housewifery and mothering would engender 'civilisation' in African women. Today, assisting women to undergo a process of self-realisation is more likely an aim of literacy programmes and reported impacts are more readily attributed to the use of participatory methods than to literacy learning. My first aim is to show that participatory approaches to adult learning are vulnerable to prescriptive manipUlations in the way conventional literacy programmes have long been. This ethnographic study focuses on two NGO literacy programmes in Uganda, one urban, one rural; to explore how women learners construct knowledge during the learning process; how they and others around them perceive this effort and its outcomes, and how this tallies with the expectations development practitioners invest in adult education. Women's ambitions are analysed both with regard to those themes of study that have been popular since colonial times (i.e. health and hygiene) and with regard to more recent concerns for women's empowerment (gender equality in the domestic and public domain). Regardless of their own intentions, programme makers are found to exercise only limited influence over the outcomes of literacy programmes. My second objective is then to illustrate how women learners and facilitators selectively interpret and internalise learning themes and use the messages received or construed to advance their own position in their social contexts. To this end women may prize externally visible health and hygiene practices as symbols of their own conversion to modem ways of living, showing less interest in benefits to physical well-being that may ensue. The desire to be recognised as a 'proper' woman also takes priority over attempts to overtly challenge prevailing norms of gender relations, not because of women's conservatism, but on the contrary, because gender relations already are subject to much overt and covert tension outside of the classes. In conclusion, the aspirations women develop from within their cultural context are seen to mould literacy programmes and their outcomes more significantly than the degree to which participatory methods are followed.
15

Gendered discourse in the foreign language classroom : teacher-student and student-teacher talk, and the social construction of children's femininities and masculinities

Sunderland, Jane January 1996 (has links)
No description available.
16

Exploring determinants of entrepreneurial performance

Thompson, Roy H. January 2013 (has links)
This thesis reports research into elements of entrepreneurial performance with a particular focus on gender differences and their determinants. Inductive research during the initial literature review uncovered a range of factors affecting performance leading to an investigation of smallholder dairy entrepreneurs in Central Malawi. The primary research utilised a mix of both quantitative and qualitative instruments including innovative use of an adaptation of the ‘circle and stones’ proportional piling instrument. This participatory technique explored changes in the household economy following the introduction of the dairy enterprise, including projecting entrepreneurial intentions into the future. A notable feature of the research was the use of a range of context-specific performance measures developed from an outcomes model. These were both separately applied in a performance ranking exercise, and compiled into an overall performance rating (OPR) which was then compared with the initial post-interview field performance rating (FPR). The research involved extensive use of internal and external triangulation of information sources, comparing results from different instruments in the field research, and situating and comparing primary research findings with those from the academic literature and analysis of secondary data. Despite controlling for factors including industry-type, size of enterprise, provision of business and extension support, and taking into account differences in age and educational background, the research uncovered gender disparities in entrepreneurial performance. The performance disparity was greater for those females who are the de facto head of their households, and lesser for those who have the support of a resident male partner. The finding of female underperformance runs contrary to the a priori expectation of industry key informants in Malawi, and much of the academic literature. The research included exploration of risk mitigation strategies and their potential effect on entrepreneurial performance, as possible explanatory factors. Follow-on fieldwork then sought alternative explanations for the gender differentials through focus group discussions and key informant interviews, which uncovered time constraints of females as a potential factor in underperformance. Future research direction indicated includes an in-depth exploration of the intra-household dynamics of time allocation in managing enterprises.
17

Fin de siècle fictions of literary degeneracy : the mutual othering of the new woman and the male aesthete

Embrechts, Karen January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
18

The traumatised male : Dada, surrealism and masculinity

Matheson, Neil January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
19

Eating cucumbers without any teeth : variations in the capacities of rural women to participate in rural development in Nepal

Shrestha, Ava Darshan January 1994 (has links)
No description available.
20

Young middle class women in Jordan : taking part in social change

Droeber, Julia January 2003 (has links)
No description available.

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