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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Video self-modeling and self-efficacy a literature review /

Steinkopf, Kimberly Kathleen. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2003. / Includes bibliographical references.
2

Evaluating the stages of behavior change model for use in diverse cultures Hong Kong versus the United States /

Silverman, Ellen Sharon. January 1995 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1995. / Chairperson: E. Scott Geller. Includes bibliographical references.
3

Reducing academic procrastination for junior secondary school students : the application of the temporal motivational theory

Fung, Man-hong, 馮文康 January 2014 (has links)
The study examined the effectiveness of a motivational package developed based on the components of the temporal motivational theory on reducing the participants’ tendency to procrastinate. Characteristics of a sample of 308 junior secondary school students (formed 14 groups) were matched and randomly assigned (in group unit) into treatment and control conditions. Through watching a video in a workshop, the treatment group learned the skills to reduce procrastination while the control group learned relaxation skills. Participants then completed an assignment in 10 school days after the intervention workshop to apply the strategies they have learnt. Results indicated that participants who received the intervention package showed significantly less behavioral procrastination than those who did not. Implications of the findings were discussed. / published_or_final_version / Educational Psychology / Master / Master of Social Sciences
4

How does normative excellence information moderate the effect of effort and ability praise on students' intrinsic motivation when they face challenges?

Lee, Man-wai, 李文慧 January 2014 (has links)
The experimental study examined how different types of praise moderated the effect of normative information on students’ self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation when they face challenges. Two hundred and Fifty Form 1 and 2 students (114 females, 136 males) were randomly assigned to six different conditions, using a 2 (Normative information: with normative information, without normative information) X 3 (Praise: ability praise, effort praise, no praise) between-groups design. Students first worked on a logical reasoning task and received a bogus quantitative feedback of a high score (8 out of 10) and a written qualitative feedback according to their assigned conditions. Students then did a similar but more challenging task and checked their scores before completing measures of self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Self-reported measure showed that after facing setbacks, students receiving effort praise and normative information in the first task indicated significantly lower self-efficacy than the students only receiving effort praise. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Keywords: effort praise, ability praise, / published_or_final_version / Educational Psychology / Master / Master of Social Sciences
5

Parent and teacher contributions to adolescent self-efficacy development

Dokis, Daphné. 10 April 2008 (has links)
The current investigation provides a preliminary investigation of the "imposed networks" (adults with whom youth interact, but were not necessarily chosen) of youth aged 8 to 12. Also evaluated was the relative influence of parents and teachers on youths' feelings of self-efficacy. Youth reported on levels of warmth, psychological control and decisionmaking at home and at school. Self-efficacy was assessed by both youth and parent report. Results indicated that the emotional climate provided by parents was more influential on girls' feelings of self-efficacy than boys, and that higher warmth was negatively associated with boys' feelings of self-efficacy. Teacher psychological control was consistently negatively related to youths' feelings of self-efficacy. No evidence was found for either additive or interactive effects of home and school environments. Instead, the pattern of results suggested that youth benefit from moderate to high levels of parental warmth, when teachers provide levels of warmth that are either equally high or lower than parents.
6

Listening to the Freshman Voice: First-year Self-efficacy and College Expectations Based on High School Types

May, Paul B. 05 1900 (has links)
This quantitative study used Astin's I-E-O theory to explore the relationship between a college freshman's high school background and academic self-efficacy. The Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement was used to measure academic self-efficacy across four types of high schools. Student gender and precollege experiences (dual-credit and communication assertiveness) were used as control. A total of 15,400 first-year students were included in this study. An ANOVA was used to examine the differences between groups, and ordinary least-square analysis was used to study the factors that affect academic self-efficacy. Results showed statistically significant difference in academic self-efficacy between public and private religious high school graduates. Specifically, graduates of public high schools had statistically higher academic self-efficacy than graduates of private religious high schools (p < .001). Additionally, females and participants of dual-credit courses also tended to have higher academic self-efficacy. Finally, analysis revealed that a first-year student's communication confidence is highly correlated to their academic self-efficacy. Results confirm in-coming first-year students perceive higher education engagement differently based on traits attributed to their precollege experiences. Results point to criteria colleges may be able to use in identifying freshmen at risk for low academic self-efficacy and, therefore, for problems in retention and degree completion.
7

impact of adventure programming on self-efficacy: a process analysis. / 歷奇活動對自我效能的影響 / The impact of adventure programming on self-efficacy: a process analysis. / Li qi huo dong dui zi wo xiao neng de ying xiang

January 2004 (has links)
Wai Chi Man Veronica = 歷奇活動對自我效能的影響 : 過程分析 / 韋智敏. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 95-103). / Text in English; abstracts in English and Chinese. / Wai Chi Man Veronica = Li qi huo dong dui zi wo xiao neng de ying xiang : guo cheng fen xi / Wei Zhimin. / Abstract --- p.i / Acknowledgements --- p.iii / List of Figures --- p.x / List of Tables --- p.xi / Chapter CHAPTER ONE --- Introduction --- p.1 / Background of the Study --- p.1 / Purpose of the Study --- p.5 / Definition of Terms --- p.6 / Delimitations --- p.6 / Limitations --- p.6 / Significance of the Study --- p.6 / Chapter CHAPTER TWO --- Review of Literature --- p.8 / Diversity of Adventure Programming --- p.8 / Models of Adventure Programming --- p.9 / The Experiential Learning Cycle --- p.9 / The Adventure-based Learning Process Model --- p.11 / The Adventure Experience Paradigm --- p.11 / The Model of Adventure Based Counseling --- p.13 / Application of Adventure Programming --- p.13 / Research in Adventure Programming --- p.15 / Outcome Research --- p.15 / Meta-analyses --- p.17 / Process Research --- p.20 / Research Directions --- p.22 / Self-efficacy --- p.23 / Definition of Self-efficacy --- p.24 / Theoretical Understanding of General Self-efficacy --- p.25 / Importance of Self-efficacy --- p.25 / Adventure Programming and Self-efficacy --- p.27 / Theoretical Connection --- p.27 / Sibthorp (2003),s Study --- p.28 / Summary --- p.30 / Chapter CHAPTER THREE --- Method --- p.31 / Participants --- p.31 / Instrumentation --- p.31 / Demographics and Psychographics --- p.31 / Measuring Self-efficacy --- p.31 / Measuring the Characteristics of Experience --- p.32 / Measuring Social Desirability --- p.33 / Procedures --- p.33 / Questionnaire Administration --- p.33 / Individual Interviews --- p.34 / Data Analyses --- p.35 / Questionnaire Data --- p.35 / Interview Data --- p.35 / Summary --- p.35 / Chapter CHAPTER FOUR --- Results --- p.36 / Questionnaire Analyses --- p.36 / Descriptive Statistics --- p.36 / Reliability of Scales --- p.36 / Self-efficacy Change --- p.37 / Social Desirability Change --- p.38 / Prediction of Post-camp Self-efficacy --- p.39 / Interview Analyses --- p.40 / Outcome Analyses --- p.42 / Process Analyses --- p.50 / Programme Factors --- p.50 / Human Factors --- p.53 / Instructor Analyses - Positive --- p.55 / Instructor Analyses 226}0ؤ Negative --- p.61 / Peer Analyses - Positive --- p.64 / Peer analyses - Negative --- p.66 / Programme Analyses 226}0ؤ Positive --- p.68 / Programme Analyses 一 Negative --- p.70 / Chapter CHAPTER FIVE --- Discussion --- p.73 / Self-efficacy Change --- p.73 / The Prediction of Self-efficacy --- p.74 / Perceived Outcomes and Self-efficacy --- p.76 / Process Factors and Sources of Self-efficacy --- p.79 / Enactive Mastery Experience --- p.80 / Vicarious Experience --- p.82 / Verbal Persuasion --- p.83 / Physiological and Affective States --- p.85 / Methodological Issues --- p.87 / Limitations --- p.90 / Chapter CHAPTER SIX --- "Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations" --- p.92 / Summary --- p.92 / Conclusions --- p.93 / Recommendations --- p.93 / APPENDIX A --- p.104 / APPENDIX B --- p.106 / APPENDIX C --- p.107 / APPENDIX D --- p.108 / APPENDIX E --- p.109 / APPENDIX F --- p.110 / APPENDIX G --- p.111 / APPENDIX H --- p.112 / APPENDIX I --- p.114 / APPENDIX J --- p.115 / APPENDIX K --- p.116 / APPENDIX L --- p.118 / APPENDIX M --- p.121 / APPENDIX N --- p.123 / APPENDIX O --- p.125 / APPENDIX P --- p.127
8

The Effect of Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy on Breastfeeding Initiation, Exclusivity, and Duration

Vincent, Adria 01 January 2015 (has links)
Breastfeeding self-efficacy is considered one of the key components of a successful breastfeeding experience. The benefits of breastfeeding are well established in the literature and have been widely communicated to the public, resulting in an increasing trend of breastfeeding initiation. However, the United States still falls short of Healthy People 2020 breastfeeding goals. The purpose of this project was to examine the effects of a standardized hospital-based prenatal breastfeeding class on breastfeeding self-efficacy. Dennis's breastfeeding self-efficacy theory was the foundation for the breastfeeding self-efficacy tool used in this project. A quasi-experimental design used a convenience sample of 30 breastfeeding class participants as the experimental group and 30 postpartum women who had no formal breastfeeding education as the control group. The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Short Form (BSES-SF) was administered to the intervention group prior to the breastfeeding class, at the end of the class, prior to hospital discharge, and at 2 weeks postpartum. The control group received the survey prior to hospital discharge and at 2 weeks postpartum. Key findings indicated that participants in the breastfeeding class demonstrated a statistically significant increase in breastfeeding confidence after the class (t = 9.55(29), p = 0.00). There was no difference between the intervention and control groups at discharge (t = -.412(47), p = 0.686). Nurses and lactation professionals are in a position to evoke social change by examining the impact of breastfeeding self-efficacy and using the findings to shape breastfeeding education.
9

Self-efficacy hos elever i gymnasieskolan och hur lärare arbetar för att stärkaself-efficacy

Taki, Venos, Coskun, Gabriella January 2009 (has links)
<p>Self-efficacy innefattar tilltro till sin egen förmåga och är ett av de mål som gymnasieskolor arbetar för. En enkätundersökning med hundrafemtio gymnasieelever utfördes med syfte att se hur dessa uppfattar sin egen tro på sin förmåga inom två olika gymnasieprogram utifrån fyra informationskällor. Även fyra intervjuer med lärare genomfördes för att ta reda på hur de arbetar för att öka elevernas tro på sin förmåga. Resultatet utifrån enkätundersökningen visade att eleverna i båda programmen hade hög self-efficacy samt att elever inom naturprogrammet upplevde att tidigare erfarenheter ökar deras self-efficacy. Eleverna inom byggprogrammet upplevde däremot att fysiska och emotionella tillstånd ökar deras self-efficacy. Intervjuundersökningen visade att lärarna genom uppmuntran stöder elevernas self-efficacy. Resultatet stämde till viss del med tidigare forskning.</p>
10

Self-efficacy hos elever i gymnasieskolan och hur lärare arbetar för att stärkaself-efficacy

Taki, Venos, Coskun, Gabriella January 2009 (has links)
Self-efficacy innefattar tilltro till sin egen förmåga och är ett av de mål som gymnasieskolor arbetar för. En enkätundersökning med hundrafemtio gymnasieelever utfördes med syfte att se hur dessa uppfattar sin egen tro på sin förmåga inom två olika gymnasieprogram utifrån fyra informationskällor. Även fyra intervjuer med lärare genomfördes för att ta reda på hur de arbetar för att öka elevernas tro på sin förmåga. Resultatet utifrån enkätundersökningen visade att eleverna i båda programmen hade hög self-efficacy samt att elever inom naturprogrammet upplevde att tidigare erfarenheter ökar deras self-efficacy. Eleverna inom byggprogrammet upplevde däremot att fysiska och emotionella tillstånd ökar deras self-efficacy. Intervjuundersökningen visade att lärarna genom uppmuntran stöder elevernas self-efficacy. Resultatet stämde till viss del med tidigare forskning.

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