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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

The crystal structure of monoferric human serum transferrin

Zuccola, Harmon Jay 08 1900 (has links)
No description available.
32

FLUORESCENCE AND THE STRUCTURES OF SERUM ALBUMINS.

ELSHEIKH, FATHELRAHMAN ABBAS. January 1987 (has links)
The perturbation of fluorescence in both bovine and human serum albumin caused by chloride, iodide, acrylamide and N-bromosuccinimide was studied under various experimental conditions. Serum albumin fluorescence lifetime changes induced by pH and added solutes were also studied, both in acid solutions and in powders. In general, the two proteins behave similarly. During the N-F transitions, the fluorescence lifetimes and the fluorescences intensities decrease in the same qualitative manner. Chloride binding enhances the fluorescence intensity, but has little or no effect on the fluorescence lifetimes. Chloride enhances the human serum albumin fluorescence intensity much more than it enhances that of bovine serum albumin. Iodide and acrylamide quench both the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes. Acrylamide quenching is hardly affected by pH changes, but is sensitive to the protein concentration. In acrylamide quenching, acrylamide molecules are partitioned into the protein matrix, causing both dynamic and static quenching. Iodide quenching is sensitive to pH, with a maximum quenching at pH 4.0. Iodide quenching decreases with increased ionic strength and with increased protein concentration. The Stern-Volmer plots obtained with iodide as the quencher are downward curving in both proteins. The downward curvature is a result of iodide binding, the main quenching mechanism. Both tryptophans in bovine serum albumin tryptophans and the single human serum albumin tryptophan are very close to the surface of the protein. The environments of the bovine serum albumin tryptophans are not very different from each other. The fluorescence lifetimes of serum albumin powders separated at pH 6.0 are very sensitive to hydration, while the lifetimes of powders separated at pH 2.0 are not. Acrylamide and iodide quench the fluorescence lifetimes of bovine serum albumin powders, even in the driest samples. Quenching is maximum at a hydration approximately equal to that required for monolayer coverage.
33

Polymerized serum albumin beads for use as slow-release adjuvants

Martin, Michelle Elizabeth Denny January 1988 (has links)
Experimental vaccines have been made by covalently bonding virus particles into polymerized rabbit serum albumin beads. Using Nodamura virus as a model antigen, these model vaccines induced specific humoral antibody production, comparable with that achieved using Freund's adjuvants. Virus specific antibodies were also induced when Nodamura virus was covalently attached to the bead surface using different crosslinkers. However, when poliovirus type 2 (Sabin strain) was polymerized into beads, the levels of neutralizing antibodies were insignificant compared with control aqueous vaccines. The synthetic immunostimulator, muramyl dipeptide, was included with bead vaccines in an attempt to potentiate the immune response. Immunostimulation is achieved by a slow release of antigen coinciding with the gradual breakdown of bead structure.
34

Evaluation of Aminoglycoside Serum Concentration Monitoring

Sun, Gloria, Christina, Juliane, Matthias, Kathyrn January 2012 (has links)
Class of 2012 Abstract / Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of when aminoglycoside serum concentrations are obtained and assess whether the timing and techniques used in obtaining aminoglycoside serum concentrations are appropriate. Additionally, pharmacists’ interpretation of aminoglycoside serum concentrations and the appropriateness of intervention in response to these results were assessed. Methods: This descriptive retrospective study to evaluate the appropriateness of aminoglycoside monitoring at an academic medical center has been approved by the Institutional Review Board. Patients over the age of 46 weeks gestational age admitted to an academic medical center between February 1, 2010 to February 1, 2011 who were prescribed intravenous aminoglycoside therapy were included in this study. Patients with therapy duration of less than 72 hours without at least one aminoglycoside level were excluded. The time of aminoglycoside concentrations in relation to time of aminoglycoside administration along with calculated pharmacokinetic parameters and therapy recommendations documented in clinical notes were also recorded. Appropriateness of aminoglycoside monitoring and documentation were determined by use of expert opinion and pharmacokinetic guidelines. Results: Timing of aminoglycoside serum concentrations and subsequent clinical assessments were evaluated in 103 subjects. The median (range) age was 28 (0.2 – 88) years. The initial aminoglycoside prescribed in 12%, 40%, and 48% of subjects was amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin, respectively. A total of 314 aminoglycoside concentrations were obtained: 41 amikacin, 129 gentamicin, and 144 tobramycin. At least one clinical pharmacokinetic assessment of aminoglycoside concentration(s) was written for 91 subjects (88%). The aminoglycoside indication, actual time of aminoglycoside dose administration, estimated renal function, and both goal peak/trough aminoglycoside concentrations were documented in at least one aminoglycoside clinical note for each of these 91 subjects at a rate of 95%, 80%, 89%, and 51%, respectively. Calculated peak, trough, estimated volume of distribution, and estimated half-life or ke were documented in 53 subjects. Conclusions: Aminoglycoside serum concentration monitoring can be used to maximize therapeutic outcomes while minimizing toxicity. However, errors in obtaining and evaluating serum drug levels can arise that may affect patient outcomes. For monitoring to be effective, the timing of serum concentration orders, the process of obtaining serum concentration samples, and the interpretation of data including pharmacokinetic calculations should be accurate.
35

Evaluation of Aminoglycoside Serum Concentration Monitoring

Sun, Gloria, Christina, Juliane January 2012 (has links)
Class of 2012 Abstract / Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of when aminoglycoside serum concentrations are obtained and assess whether the timing and techniques used in obtaining aminoglycoside serum concentrations are appropriate. Additionally, pharmacists’ interpretation of aminoglycoside serum concentrations and the appropriateness of intervention in response to these results were assessed. Methods: This descriptive retrospective study to evaluate the appropriateness of aminoglycoside monitoring at an academic medical center has been approved by the Institutional Review Board. Patients over the age of 46 weeks gestational age admitted to an academic medical center between February 1, 2010 to February 1, 2011 who were prescribed intravenous aminoglycoside therapy were included in this study. Patients with therapy duration of less than 72 hours without at least one aminoglycoside level were excluded. The time of aminoglycoside concentrations in relation to time of aminoglycoside administration along with calculated pharmacokinetic parameters and therapy recommendations documented in clinical notes were also recorded. Appropriateness of aminoglycoside monitoring and documentation were determined by use of expert opinion and pharmacokinetic guidelines. Results: Timing of aminoglycoside serum concentrations and subsequent clinical assessments were evaluated in 103 subjects. The median (range) age was 28 (0.2 – 88) years. The initial aminoglycoside prescribed in 12%, 40%, and 48% of subjects was amikacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin, respectively. A total of 314 aminoglycoside concentrations were obtained: 41 amikacin, 129 gentamicin, and 144 tobramycin. At least one clinical pharmacokinetic assessment of aminoglycoside concentration(s) was written for 91 subjects (88%). The aminoglycoside indication, actual time of aminoglycoside dose administration, estimated renal function, and both goal peak/trough aminoglycoside concentrations were documented in at least one aminoglycoside clinical note for each of these 91 subjects at a rate of 95%, 80%, 89%, and 51%, respectively. Calculated peak, trough, estimated volume of distribution, and estimated half-life or ke were documented in 53 subjects. Conclusions: Aminoglycoside serum concentration monitoring can be used to maximize therapeutic outcomes while minimizing toxicity. However, errors in obtaining and evaluating serum drug levels can arise that may affect patient outcomes. For monitoring to be effective, the timing of serum concentration orders, the process of obtaining serum concentration samples, and the interpretation of data including pharmacokinetic calculations should be accurate.
36

The adsorption of bovine serum albumin on fused silica : a single molecules study

Yeung, Kai Ming 01 January 2008 (has links)
No description available.
37

The Inheritance of Serum Alkaline Phosphatase in the Pigeon (Columba livia)

Manley, James H.,Jr. 08 1900 (has links)
The purpose of this work was to determine the manner of inheritance of serum alkaline phosphatase in the racing pigeon, (Columba livia). The evidence indicates that the electrophoretic patterns of serum alkaline phosphatase in the pigeon are inherited as codominant genes.
38

Investigation of the substrate specificity of recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase

Harrison, Jennifer Amanda January 1999 (has links)
The protozoan blood-borne parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, an enervating and often fatal illness prevalent in South and Central America for which there is no effective treatment. T. cruzi has a cell-surface trans- sialidase which transfers sialic acid from mammalian oligosaccharides to the parasite. This action allows adhesion to and invasion of mammalian cells, subsequently allowing parasitic replication. This protein therefore is exploitable and represents a potential target for the development of chemotherapeutic agents. This thesis describes the purification of recombinant trans-sialidase and the development of a rapid, reliable spectrophotometric coupled assay to measure trans-sialidase activity. It also details the use of three mutually exclusive synthetic oligosaccharide libraries to map substrate recognition for the enzyme. Synthetic fragments of the natural branched oligosaccharide substrates have also been sialylated on a preparative scale, demonstrating the use of trans-sialidase in synthetic oligosaccharide chemistry.
39

A novel adjuvant : polymerised serum albumin beads

Dewar, John Barr January 1985 (has links)
Lee, T. et al (1981) proposed the encapsulation of hormones such as progesterone into serum albumin beads, such that their in vivo proteolysis would allow a gradual release of hormone at low levels, for extended hormone action. It was proposed, in the Department of Microbiology, Rhodes University, to replace the hormone component of the above bead formulation, with virus as antigen, in the development of a vaccine. Beads optimally crosslinked at 1% final glutaraldehyde concentration, containing Nodamura virus, were shown to promote an adjuvant effect in vivo, analogous to the release of antigen from Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA), so that extended immunostimulation resulted. It was shown that soluble antigen promoted a short-lived primary immune response, peaking around day 25 following inoculation. Antigen presented in beads, on the other hand, initially elicited a low humoral response, but this response gradually increased up to a peak around day 110 post inoculation, before decreasing. No apparent adverse side-effects were noted following inoculation of antigen-containing serum albumin beads, compared to necrosis following antigen in FCA inoculation, supporting the proposal of using albumin homotypic for the test inoculee animal, so that the beads would themselves be non-immunogenic and would merely act as a vehicle in the vaccine formulation. The indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to monitor the humoral response to antigen following inoculation. Results showed that covalent crosslinking of albumin in the formation of the beads did not promote immunogenicity on the part of the chemically altered albumin. The ELISA test was used to indicate the kinetics of the IgG response to Nodamura virus when presented in formulations such as: Freely soluble virus or its subunit; soluble intact virus inactivated by treatment with glutaraldehyde; intact virus entrapped in serum albumin beads cross; linked at different percentage final glutaraldehyde concentrations and also virus subunit prepared in albumin beads. The presence of virus-neutral ising antibodies was noted in serum obtained from rabbits inoculated with virus entrapped in albumin beads. Virus infectivity, titrated in mice, showed protection against virus challenge after incubation of virus with serum obtained above.
40

Cholecystokinin : measurement, biological action and clinical significance

Marshall, Christopher Edwin January 1979 (has links)
This thesis describes in full the development of a biological method of estimating cholecystokinin (CCK) in human serum by superfusion of rabbit gall-bladder strips, from the early stages of the manual technique, which would estimate approximately twelve samples per day, to the more sophisticated and clinically useful automated technique of today which can estimate up to forty eight sample solutions in duplicate each day. In developing this bioassay for CCK it was necessary to determine whether the gall-bladder preparation was stable for the duration of the experiment, and also whether or not there were other factors influencing the response of the gallbladder strips to a given stimulus. It was also necessary to determine whether the assay was entirely specific for CCK in human serum and to counteract any possible degradation of CCK during processing and storage of serum. In the light of the findings during the above experiments the technique was modified to eliminate errors that would otherwise be made in estimating the CCK content of a serum sample. Since our attempts to set up a radioimmunoassay were unsuccessful a comparison of this bioassay was made with another groups' radioimmunoassay. Although no direct comparison could be made as the two assays measure CCK in totally different units, nevertheless a straight line relationship between the two very different methods was found, and this experiment led directly to the discovery by bioassay of CCK mimicking substances in serum. The action of trypsin on CCK has been clearly demonstrated and its ability to release the C-terminal octa and more probably the dodeca peptide, both of which are considerably more active than the full molecule, is beyond question. It is therefore important that an enzyme inhibitor is added to blood samples to prevent this spontaneous breakdown of more active fragments and prevent false readings of serum cholecystokinin activity. During chromatographic investigations a new molecule in human serum which possessed cholecystokinetic activity but had a molecular weight in excess of 30,000 (c/f 3,900 for normal CCK) was discovered. This molecule appeared to predominate in the fasting state but to decrease in concentration during the response to a meal. The practical use of measuring serum CCK is demonstrated in some clinical trials in which CCK's target organs are removed or the stimulation for its release is modified by various surgical procedures. Some interesting changes are noted.

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