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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An investigation into Wisconsin public schools sexual abuse intervention programs

Dempze, Jessica R. January 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references.
2

'N Intervensiemodel vir die middelkinderjare-kind wat seksueel misbruik is

Britz, Linda. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (D. Phil. (Social Work))--University of Pretoria, 2003. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 278-307).
3

An exploratory study on the relationship between female victims and their non-offending mothers after the disclosure of intrafamilial child sexual abuse : developing a framework for intervention /

Chan, Suk-fan. January 1998 (has links)
Thesis (M. Soc. Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 1998. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 109-114).
4

An exploratory study on the relationship between female victims and their non-offending mothers after the disclosure of intrafamilial child sexual abuse developing a framework for intervention /

Chan, Suk-fan. January 1998 (has links)
Thesis (M.Soc.Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 1998. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 109-114) Also available in print.
5

Efficacy of treatments for sexually abused children a meta-analysis /

Trask, Emily V. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2008. / Title from title screen (site viewed Jan. 15, 2009). PDF text: iv, 82 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 591 K. UMI publication number: AAT 3323492. Includes bibliographical references. Also available in microfilm and microfiche formats.
6

Recalled childhood sexual abuse related to marital satisfaction

Lawson, David. January 2005 (has links)
Theses (M.A.)--Marshall University, 2005. / Title from document title page. Includes abstract. Document formatted into pages: contains iv, 32 pages. Bibliography: p. 29-32.
7

A Canadian South Asian’s experience of childhood sexual abuse and its after-effects: a revelatory narrative case study

Best, Maxime Pascale Norrys 11 1900 (has links)
Most adult childhood sexual abuse survivors in counselling and discussed in the literature are Caucasians of western ethnicity, and most counselling for survivors is based on western counselling theories. Whether the experience of childhood sexual abuse and counselling for its after-effects among Caucasian western survivors accurately reflects the experience of survivors of differing race and/or ethnicity has been little explored. Data specific to the experience of adult survivors of Asian ethnicity is very limited. To investigate this underexplored issue, a single revelatory case study was undertaken which used a phenomenological approach. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with a female adult South Asian Ismaili Canadian childhood sexual abuse survivor, and based on adjunctive sources of evidence, a narrative life history was developed (and validated by the survivor) which described the survivor's experience of childhood sexual abuse and its aftermath and the meaning she made of her experience. Upon analysis, it was found that the survivor's narrative was not only the account of a South Asian woman who had been sexually abused in childhood, but the account of a woman who had experienced emotional neglect, physical abuse, and racism. The analysis revealed an overall narrative structure and a number of themes which indicated that the meaning the survivor made of her cummulative experiences was to self-identify as a victim and to develop a victim script which permeated most aspects of her life, which continued into adulthood, and which was inextricably linked to her identity as an Indian female. This study found that the survivor's cultural/religious environment seemed to exacerbate her victimization experience and healing opportunities, while her personal religious beliefs appeared to offer her support. Both cultural and religious elements influenced the meaning the survivor made of her experiences.
8

A Canadian South Asian’s experience of childhood sexual abuse and its after-effects: a revelatory narrative case study

Best, Maxime Pascale Norrys 11 1900 (has links)
Most adult childhood sexual abuse survivors in counselling and discussed in the literature are Caucasians of western ethnicity, and most counselling for survivors is based on western counselling theories. Whether the experience of childhood sexual abuse and counselling for its after-effects among Caucasian western survivors accurately reflects the experience of survivors of differing race and/or ethnicity has been little explored. Data specific to the experience of adult survivors of Asian ethnicity is very limited. To investigate this underexplored issue, a single revelatory case study was undertaken which used a phenomenological approach. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with a female adult South Asian Ismaili Canadian childhood sexual abuse survivor, and based on adjunctive sources of evidence, a narrative life history was developed (and validated by the survivor) which described the survivor's experience of childhood sexual abuse and its aftermath and the meaning she made of her experience. Upon analysis, it was found that the survivor's narrative was not only the account of a South Asian woman who had been sexually abused in childhood, but the account of a woman who had experienced emotional neglect, physical abuse, and racism. The analysis revealed an overall narrative structure and a number of themes which indicated that the meaning the survivor made of her cummulative experiences was to self-identify as a victim and to develop a victim script which permeated most aspects of her life, which continued into adulthood, and which was inextricably linked to her identity as an Indian female. This study found that the survivor's cultural/religious environment seemed to exacerbate her victimization experience and healing opportunities, while her personal religious beliefs appeared to offer her support. Both cultural and religious elements influenced the meaning the survivor made of her experiences. / Education, Faculty of / Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education (ECPS), Department of / Graduate
9

The underlying needs and subconscious dynamics of a sexually abused female child : an educational psychological perspective

Byrne, Jacqueline 22 August 2012 (has links)
D.Ed. / The underlying dynamics of Cases A and B have been integrated into a comprehensive description in this chapter. The cross case analysis allowed the researcher to determine the similarities and differences in these two cases. These research findings were then verified against a detailed literature control. The research, as verified by current literature, shows that women who were sexually abused as children all suffer from an Identity Problem. Most literature on the treatment of sexual abuse victims stresses the need to address the women's low selfesteem. Yet, the treatment is geared at her present low self-esteem believed to be a result of the abuse. The research findings agree that sexually abused women have low self-esteem, although their Identity Problem is not a result of the abuse, but an intensification of an already present low self-esteem and Identity Problem. The research findings indicate that their Identity Problems started before the abuse, as early as in the womb. The present Identity Problem renders the young girl more vulnerable to the abuse. The treatment of women who were sexually abused as children should be aimed at reconstructing their Identity's and specifically at treating the root cause of the problem, which is not the abuse itself. Women who were sexually abused as children are prone to feelings of worthlessness and responsibility. Powered by their Identity Problem, a Spiritual Walking Zombie Syndrome develops. Sexually abused women have an overwhelming sense of being responsible for others. And if they cannot keep others happy, which is impossible, they feel like failures and think they are worthless. The feeling of being responsible starts before the sexual violation and the abuse only intensifies these feelings. The research finds that sexual abuse can be a physical, subconscious threat to a person. Subconscious reactions to life threatening incidents differ from individual to individual. If one has accepted death one tends to act dead-like. On the other hand, if one expects death one lives in fear of dying and life is full of disasters. The research also finds that as a result of pre-natal and early childhood experiences, sexually abused women tend to act immaturely when compared to their chronological age. Their immaturity is evident in their dress, their constant self-rejection and by their dysfunctional relationships. From the research findings it is clear that each individual plays out her own life script. This life script determines how she reacts to herself and her environment. Women who were sexually abused as children have a similar life script, which in turn makes them more prone to abuse. Sexually abused women deny themselves the right to be themselves. Their perceived shameful existence, of relegating themselves, starts prior to the abuse. Treatment should therefore address these destructive life scripts and not treat the presenting symptoms. Chapter 7 proposes recommendations for the treatment and prevention of sexual abuse.
10

Childhood sexual abuse : disclosure in the school setting

Barbeau, Andrée Yvonne January 1990 (has links)
This research attempted to examine the reasons why children and youths disclose their sexual victimization, as well as the manner of their disclosure, specific to the school setting. An original questionnaire was developed, and given out to all the school social workers from one social service agency. Each worker chose, non-randomly one case of sexual abuse disclosure. / It was hypothesized that if a child or youth had decided to disclose their sexual victimization in the school setting they would do so in a planned and overt manner, choosing an adult with whom they had a close, positive and trusting relationship; a positive authority figure. Both hypotheses were borne out, although the strongest predictors of planned disclosure in this study, were that the victim had a positive relationship with the adult they told, knew them fairly well, and that they were being abused by their natural father or live-in father-figure.

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