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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Abhängigkeit und Funktion des Sports in Ghana

Lebert, Helmut, January 1982 (has links)
Thesis--Bochum. Ruhr-Universität. / In Periodical Room.
2

Envisioning basketball: a socio-biographical investigation of Ruth Wilson - one of western Canada's sporting pioneers

Job, Christiane 05 1900 (has links)
The history of women’s basketball in Canada has been influenced by key individuals who have challenged systemic barriers and social mores demanding appropriate female behaviors and activities. In this study I examine the sporting contributions of Vancouverite Ruth Wilson, whose involvements in the sport of women’s basketball from the mid 1930s through the 1960s was significant. Though several studies have highlighted the importance of women’s basketball in a North American context (Hall, 2002; Cahn, 1994; Kidd, 1996; Hult and Trekell, 1991), to date there has not been a significant examination of the development of basketball for women and its early advocates in western Canada. Celebrating heroines of sport is not a straightforward matter. The concept of the heroic, as Hargreaves points out, must be examined through an analysis of the struggles and achievements of many women whose stories have been excluded or forgotten from previous accounts of women’s sports and female heroism (Hargreaves, 2000). Thus my account of Ruth Wilson’s contributions provides a unique case study of one womans persistent and wide ranging efforts to change the ways in which girls and women participated in a sport which brought them freedom to compete, professional opportunities and in some cases, national status. This study employs several methodological techniques. Data was collected through primary and secondary document analysis in conjunction with semi-structured open ended interviews. Ruth Wilson’s contributions have been highlighted through the narratives of female sportswomen whom she mentored, assisted, befriended and coached and who are still living today to provide their memories about her role in changing the landscape of women’s basketball in Canada.
3

Envisioning basketball: a socio-biographical investigation of Ruth Wilson - one of western Canada's sporting pioneers

Job, Christiane 05 1900 (has links)
The history of women’s basketball in Canada has been influenced by key individuals who have challenged systemic barriers and social mores demanding appropriate female behaviors and activities. In this study I examine the sporting contributions of Vancouverite Ruth Wilson, whose involvements in the sport of women’s basketball from the mid 1930s through the 1960s was significant. Though several studies have highlighted the importance of women’s basketball in a North American context (Hall, 2002; Cahn, 1994; Kidd, 1996; Hult and Trekell, 1991), to date there has not been a significant examination of the development of basketball for women and its early advocates in western Canada. Celebrating heroines of sport is not a straightforward matter. The concept of the heroic, as Hargreaves points out, must be examined through an analysis of the struggles and achievements of many women whose stories have been excluded or forgotten from previous accounts of women’s sports and female heroism (Hargreaves, 2000). Thus my account of Ruth Wilson’s contributions provides a unique case study of one womans persistent and wide ranging efforts to change the ways in which girls and women participated in a sport which brought them freedom to compete, professional opportunities and in some cases, national status. This study employs several methodological techniques. Data was collected through primary and secondary document analysis in conjunction with semi-structured open ended interviews. Ruth Wilson’s contributions have been highlighted through the narratives of female sportswomen whom she mentored, assisted, befriended and coached and who are still living today to provide their memories about her role in changing the landscape of women’s basketball in Canada.
4

Strategische Markenführung im Sport mit Sponsoring und Eventmarketing unter Berücksichtigung der Auswirkungen auf den Sport /

Ostermann, Frank. January 2009 (has links)
Zugl.: Göttingen, Universiẗat, Diss., 2009.
5

Gleichberechtigte Partizipation im Sport? : ein Beitrag zur geschlechtsbezogenen Sportpädagogik /

Gieß-Stüber, Petra. January 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Dt. Sporthochsch., Habil.-Schr.--Köln, 2000. / Literaturverz. S. 277 - 302.
6

Envisioning basketball: a socio-biographical investigation of Ruth Wilson - one of western Canada's sporting pioneers

Job, Christiane 05 1900 (has links)
The history of women’s basketball in Canada has been influenced by key individuals who have challenged systemic barriers and social mores demanding appropriate female behaviors and activities. In this study I examine the sporting contributions of Vancouverite Ruth Wilson, whose involvements in the sport of women’s basketball from the mid 1930s through the 1960s was significant. Though several studies have highlighted the importance of women’s basketball in a North American context (Hall, 2002; Cahn, 1994; Kidd, 1996; Hult and Trekell, 1991), to date there has not been a significant examination of the development of basketball for women and its early advocates in western Canada. Celebrating heroines of sport is not a straightforward matter. The concept of the heroic, as Hargreaves points out, must be examined through an analysis of the struggles and achievements of many women whose stories have been excluded or forgotten from previous accounts of women’s sports and female heroism (Hargreaves, 2000). Thus my account of Ruth Wilson’s contributions provides a unique case study of one womans persistent and wide ranging efforts to change the ways in which girls and women participated in a sport which brought them freedom to compete, professional opportunities and in some cases, national status. This study employs several methodological techniques. Data was collected through primary and secondary document analysis in conjunction with semi-structured open ended interviews. Ruth Wilson’s contributions have been highlighted through the narratives of female sportswomen whom she mentored, assisted, befriended and coached and who are still living today to provide their memories about her role in changing the landscape of women’s basketball in Canada. / Education, Faculty of / Kinesiology, School of / Graduate
7

Understanding Motivations for Participation in Adaptive Sports

January 2019 (has links)
abstract: Participation in competitive sports by athletes who are physically disabled has increased dramatically in recent decades. Given this growth in participation, sports for disabled athletes represents a worthy area of exploration. The purpose of this research is to further understand what motivates people and athletes with physical impairments to partake in adaptive recreation and sport. This study will explore motivations for participation in adaptive sport within theoretical lenses of Achievement Goal Theory (AGT), Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and the Five-Factor Model by Omar-Fauzee and colleagues (2010). In addition, this study examined the relationship between motives with sense of community and life satisfaction. Seventy-one participants completed the online survey regarding the questions of interest. In order to determine if different motivations or achievement goals predicted sense of community, life satisfaction and psychological well-being, five regression models were tested. Descriptive statistics were utilized to assess the strongest motivators. Within the five-factor model, interest represented the strongest motivator followed by competency. Within the SDT framework, relatedness emerged as the strongest motivation factor. When AGT was tested, individuals with disabilities were found to be more task-oriented then ego-oriented. This indicates that people that participate in adaptive athletics value social connections, sense of freedom and developing their knowledge for sport-specific activity. / Dissertation/Thesis / Masters Thesis Community Resources and Development 2019
8

Protective Responses during a Sideways Fall: Effects of Secondary Tasks

Shankar, Sneha January 2006 (has links)
Falls and hip fractures are a major public health problem among the elderly. In addition to bone strength, sideways falls and direct hip impact are important determinants for hip fracture. However, few falls actually cause serious injury in both young and older adults. Therefore, understanding how individuals facilitate a safe landing during a fall will help guide appropriate exercise-based training programs. The primary purpose of this thesis was to investigate the effects of secondary tasks on movement strategies during a sideways fall. <br /><br /> To address this aim, I used a tether and electromagnet to suddenly release subjects from a sideways leaning position, causing them to fall onto a gymnasium mat. I instructed subjects to "fall and protect yourself, as if you were landing on a hard surface". I acquired trials in four conditions, presented in a pseudo-random order: falling while holding a box, falling while holding an empty mug, falling while reciting spoken text, and falling with no secondary task. In most trials, regardless of condition, impact occurred to the lateral aspect of the pelvis (no secondary task = 87%, box = 82%, cognitive = 90%, mug = 79%). While the frequency of impact to both hands decreased when carrying an object (box=67%, mug=50% compared to cognitive=90% and no secondary task=85%), 40% of trials in the mug condition involved one hand contacting the ground, indicating hand impact was still common. It appears when protective movements such as impact to the knees and hands did occur, they were not used to avoid direct hip impact. Instead, they were used to help break the fall, and to avoid head impact, which was not seen in this experiment. The results from this study indicate that secondary tasks have minimal effects on fall responses and that the rare occurrence of hip fractures in the young is due to some combination of bone strength and effective use of body segments to break the fall. <br /><br /> In a second study, I examined how a cognitive task affected the ability of young women to rotate forward (FR) or backward (BR) during a sideways fall. Subjects were released from a sideways leaning position and were provided with a visual cue upon tether release instructing them on the desired direction of rotation. The site of impact on the pelvis (as reflected by the hip proximity angle) was closer to the lateral aspect of the hip in cognitive trials than in control trials (43 ?? 18?? versus 51 ?? 19?? in FR and 59 ?? 18?? versus 68 ?? 18?? in BR) (p=0. 0006). This was due to a longer delay in the initiation of rotation in cognitive trials (293 ?? 60 ms versus 232 ?? 71 ms in FR and 278 ?? 87 ms versus 239 ?? 60 ms), as opposed to a change in mean angular velocity. Pelvis impact velocity was similar in the two conditions (2. 6 ?? 0. 3 m/s compared to 2. 7 ?? 0. 3 m/s in FR trials and 2. 8 ?? 0. 2 m/s compared to 2. 9 ?? 0. 2 m/s in BR trials) (p=0. 0514). The results from this study indicate that involvement in a secondary task can impair safe landing responses. Secondary attentional tasks cause a delay in the initiation of fall protective responses, which alters landing configuration. However, the motor programme that governs falling, remaining consistent across condition is robust to changes in task execution at the onset of the fall.
9

Similarities and differences between male professional versus high performance amateur athletes' retirement experiences

Lagimodiere, Chris 11 September 2012 (has links)
The purpose of the current study was to investigate the similarities and differences of retirement experiences of professional versus high performance amateur athletes determined by participation statistics in Canada. Results were obtained through qualitative interviews with 5 retired professional hockey players, and 4 retired high performance amateur rugby players who retired from sport within the last 15 years. Interview questions were based on Wylleman and Lavallee’s theoretical model of transitions faced by athletes at athletic, individual, psychosocial, and academic/vocational levels. The research concluded that there are many similarities experienced by professional hockey and high performance amateur rugby athletes regarding their sport retirement. However, there are also some considerable differences experienced by these athletes. Additional research may lead to awareness of coping resources and supports available to athletes experiencing retirement from various sports to help improve preparation and the quality of retirement experiences.
10

Similarities and differences between male professional versus high performance amateur athletes' retirement experiences

Lagimodiere, Chris 11 September 2012 (has links)
The purpose of the current study was to investigate the similarities and differences of retirement experiences of professional versus high performance amateur athletes determined by participation statistics in Canada. Results were obtained through qualitative interviews with 5 retired professional hockey players, and 4 retired high performance amateur rugby players who retired from sport within the last 15 years. Interview questions were based on Wylleman and Lavallee’s theoretical model of transitions faced by athletes at athletic, individual, psychosocial, and academic/vocational levels. The research concluded that there are many similarities experienced by professional hockey and high performance amateur rugby athletes regarding their sport retirement. However, there are also some considerable differences experienced by these athletes. Additional research may lead to awareness of coping resources and supports available to athletes experiencing retirement from various sports to help improve preparation and the quality of retirement experiences.

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