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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Adjustable speed drive bearing fault detection via support vector machine incorporating feature selection using genetic algorithm

Teotrakool, Kaptan, January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2007. / The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on March 3, 2008) Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
22

Variable-Speed Switched Reluctance Motor Drives for Low-Cost, High-Volume Applications

Kim, Jaehyuck 29 March 2010 (has links)
Demand for energy-saving variable speed drives in low-cost, high-volume appliances has increased due to energy and environmental concerns and hence the need to comply with new regulations. Switched reluctance motor (SRMs) have been considered by many as attractive alternatives for brush commutated motors or permanent magnet brushless dc motors (PMBDCMs) in such cost-sensitive applications. The SRMs' unique features such as simple and fault-tolerant structure and unidirectional flow of their phase currents endow them with the possibility of various configurations on both machine and converter topologies for different applications. In the present study, three different variable-speed motor drive systems are proposed, studied, and implemented for their deployment in low-cost, high-volume applications with the power rating of 1.5kW or less. Two different two-phase SRMs and three different power converters are employed to realize three different low-cost drive systems. The first drive system is realized using a novel converter requiring only a single-controllable switch and an asymmetric two-phase 8/4 SRM capable of self-starting and four-quadrant operation. The second drive system is realized using another novel converter requiring two controllable switches, that way to achieve better control and utilization of the asymmetric 8/4 motor. The target applications for both drive systems are low power, low performance drives such as fans, hand tools, small appliances, etc. The third system is realized using a high-speed two-phase 4/2 SRM and a split ac source converter, which is designed for high-speed applications such as vacuum cleaners, ultracentrifuges, etc. The control and design aspects for each drive system are studied. Selection of optimal firing angles and optimal number of winding turns are also investigated. All of the drive systems are first demonstrated on the position sensor-based speed-control scheme. To make the drive system even more cost-competitive, operation without the position sensor using the novel parameter insensitive sensorless control scheme is proposed and implemented. Concept, analysis, simulation, and experimental verification of the proposed sensorless scheme are discussed in detail. / Ph. D.
23

Voltage Sag Ride-Through and Harmonics Mitigation for Adjustable Speed Drives using Dual-Functional Hardware

Salib, Anton Samir January 2006 (has links)
Great portion of today's industry are <em>Adjustable Speed Drives</em> (<em>ASD's</em>) operated in order to fulfill certain processes. When these processes are critical ones or sensitive to voltage disturbances, that might take place due to inserting high load in an area near to the Point of Common Coupling (<em>PCC</em>) of the process or due to a short term outage, few tens of thousands up to millions of dollars will be lost once such interruptions (voltage sags) take place as a result of the process failure. On the other hand, a distorted voltage waveform at the PCC for some sensitive process might malfunction as a result of the high harmonic content of the voltage waveform. Utilities are required to deliver as pure as possible sinusoidal voltage waveform according to certain limits; thus, they might apply fines against the consumers who are responsible for producing high amounts of current harmonics that affect the voltage wave shape at the <em>PCC</em> in order to force them to improve the consumer's load profile by adding filters at <em>PCC</em> for instance. Utilities are charging the consumers who are drawing power at poor power factor as well. <br /><br /> This thesis presents an <em>ASD</em> retrofitted with a dual-functional piece of hardware connected in series to its <em>DC-link</em> that is capable of handling the previously two mentioned problems. In other words, hardware that is capable of providing <em>voltage sag ride-through</em> during the voltage sag conditions on one side, on the other side, during the normal operating conditions, it is capable to mitigate the harmonic contents of the drawn current by the ASD's rectifier and to improve the power factor. <br /><br /> Survey on voltage sag ride-through for ASD's approaches are presented in the literature has been made. Approaches are classified as the topology utilized; first, topologies that utilizes energy storage elements that store energy to compensate the DC-link voltage with during the voltage sags, second, topologies retrofitting the DC-link itself with additional hardware to compensate the DC-link voltage. The first group is capable to provide voltage compensating during the full outages while the second can't. The presented voltage sag ride-through work of this thesis belongs to the second group. <br /><br /> Boost converter has been used as the hardware to compensate the DC-link voltage because of its simplicity and cheap price. An adaptive linear network (ADALINE) is investigated as the detection system to detect the envelope of the input voltage waveform. Once the envelope of the voltage goes below a certain level, the boost converter is activated to compensate the difference between voltage set point and the actual DC-link voltage. Simulation results supporting the proposed configuration are presented. <br /><br /> A third-harmonic current injection approach is utilized in this work in order to achieve <em>total harmonic distortion</em> (<em>THD</em>) mitigation from 32% to 5. 125% (theoretically). Two third-harmonic current injection networks have been investigated; one utilizes a real resistor, the other utilizes a resistor emulator to reduce the energy dissipated. The proposed controller for the resistor emulator does not require a proportional-integral (PI) controller. <br /><br /> As a result of the common devices between the voltage sag ride-through circuitry and the harmonic mitigation one, they can be integrated together in one circuitry connected in series with the DC-link of the ASD. And hence, the dual functionality of the hardware will be achieved. Simulation results supporting the theoretical results have been presented.
24

A microprocessor based speed and current level controller for a variable mutual reluctance machine

Gandler, William Robert January 1982 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1982. / MICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND ENGINEERING / Includes bibliographical references. / by William Robert Gandler. / M.S.
25

A field-modulated, variable-speed to constant-frequency power converter

Bliamptis, Tim Emmanuel January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1981. / MICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND ENGINEERING. / Bibliography: leaves 109-110. / by Tim Emmanuel Bliamptis. / M.S.
26

A remotely controlled power quality test platform for characterizing the ride-through capabilities of adjustable speed drives

Matheson, Evelyn 08 June 2001 (has links)
With the increased attention on high efficiency and controllability of industrial processes, as well as reduced weight, volume and cost of consumer products, the applications of nonlinear power electronic converters such as adjustable speed drives (ASDs) are showing a rapid rise. Power Quality (PQ) is becoming an increasing concern with the growth of both sensitive and disturbing nonlinear loads in the residential, commercial and industrial levels of the power system, where PQ related disruptions can cause system malfunction, product loss, and hardware damage resulting in costly data loss and downtime. Investigating and mitigating PQ issues pertaining to the input supply of ASDs and other sensitive power electronic equipment is extremely important in maintaining a high level of productivity. In response to these concerns, this research focuses on the development of a power quality test platform (PQTP) that has been implemented at Oregon State University (OSU), in the Motor Systems Resource Facility (MSRF). The central component of the PQTP is a 120kVA programmable ac power source with an integrated arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) which creates realistic voltage disturbance conditions that can be used to characterize ride-through capabilities of industrial processes in a controlled environment. Also presented is a command driver database that has been created and tested, using Lab VIEW, which contains the functionality necessary to conduct a wide range of power quality research and testing projects by remotely configuring and controlling the AWG. The power quality research and testing capabilities of the PQTP are demonstrated with ASD diode-bridge rectifier operation analysis and ride-through characterization. This research shows the transition of an ASD's three-phase diode rectifier into single-phase diode rectifier operation when relatively small single-phase voltage sags are applied to the input. Also shown are ride-through characterizations of varying sizes and configurations of ASDs when subjected to single, two, and three-phase voltage sags as well as capacitor switching transients. In addition, ASD topologies providing improved ride-through capabilities are determined. / Graduation date: 2002
27

Voltage Sag Ride-Through and Harmonics Mitigation for Adjustable Speed Drives using Dual-Functional Hardware

Salib, Anton Samir January 2006 (has links)
Great portion of today's industry are <em>Adjustable Speed Drives</em> (<em>ASD's</em>) operated in order to fulfill certain processes. When these processes are critical ones or sensitive to voltage disturbances, that might take place due to inserting high load in an area near to the Point of Common Coupling (<em>PCC</em>) of the process or due to a short term outage, few tens of thousands up to millions of dollars will be lost once such interruptions (voltage sags) take place as a result of the process failure. On the other hand, a distorted voltage waveform at the PCC for some sensitive process might malfunction as a result of the high harmonic content of the voltage waveform. Utilities are required to deliver as pure as possible sinusoidal voltage waveform according to certain limits; thus, they might apply fines against the consumers who are responsible for producing high amounts of current harmonics that affect the voltage wave shape at the <em>PCC</em> in order to force them to improve the consumer's load profile by adding filters at <em>PCC</em> for instance. Utilities are charging the consumers who are drawing power at poor power factor as well. <br /><br /> This thesis presents an <em>ASD</em> retrofitted with a dual-functional piece of hardware connected in series to its <em>DC-link</em> that is capable of handling the previously two mentioned problems. In other words, hardware that is capable of providing <em>voltage sag ride-through</em> during the voltage sag conditions on one side, on the other side, during the normal operating conditions, it is capable to mitigate the harmonic contents of the drawn current by the ASD's rectifier and to improve the power factor. <br /><br /> Survey on voltage sag ride-through for ASD's approaches are presented in the literature has been made. Approaches are classified as the topology utilized; first, topologies that utilizes energy storage elements that store energy to compensate the DC-link voltage with during the voltage sags, second, topologies retrofitting the DC-link itself with additional hardware to compensate the DC-link voltage. The first group is capable to provide voltage compensating during the full outages while the second can't. The presented voltage sag ride-through work of this thesis belongs to the second group. <br /><br /> Boost converter has been used as the hardware to compensate the DC-link voltage because of its simplicity and cheap price. An adaptive linear network (ADALINE) is investigated as the detection system to detect the envelope of the input voltage waveform. Once the envelope of the voltage goes below a certain level, the boost converter is activated to compensate the difference between voltage set point and the actual DC-link voltage. Simulation results supporting the proposed configuration are presented. <br /><br /> A third-harmonic current injection approach is utilized in this work in order to achieve <em>total harmonic distortion</em> (<em>THD</em>) mitigation from 32% to 5. 125% (theoretically). Two third-harmonic current injection networks have been investigated; one utilizes a real resistor, the other utilizes a resistor emulator to reduce the energy dissipated. The proposed controller for the resistor emulator does not require a proportional-integral (PI) controller. <br /><br /> As a result of the common devices between the voltage sag ride-through circuitry and the harmonic mitigation one, they can be integrated together in one circuitry connected in series with the DC-link of the ASD. And hence, the dual functionality of the hardware will be achieved. Simulation results supporting the theoretical results have been presented.
28

A continuously variable power-split transmission in a hybrid-electric sport utility vehicle

Gomez, Miguel M. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--West Virginia University, 2003. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains xiii, 107 p. : ill. (some col.). Vita. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 102-107).
29

Polyspectral signal analysis techniques for interharmonics in shipboard power systems

Kim, Taekhyun, 1977- 18 September 2012 (has links)
In this dissertation, we present the theory and application of polyspectral signal analysis techniques for interharmonics in shipboard power systems. Interharmonics are generated from various kinds of adjustable speed drives (ASD) in such power systems. ASDs are highly nonlinear devices due to the use of rectifiers and inverters. Since interharmonics can seriously hamper the normal operation of electric ships in many different ways (e.g., excitation of undesirable electrical and/or mechanical resonances, misoperation of control devices, and light flicker), the detection and analysis of interharmonic-related events is a critical issue in assessing power quality in an all-electric ship. Standard signal analysis techniques for regular harmonics are not immediately applicable to interharmonics due to their small amplitude and uncertain frequency of occurrence. Hence, we propose the use of alternative polyspectral analysis techniques such as higher-order spectra (the cross bispectrum/bicoherence) for the detection and analysis of the ASD-generated interharmonics. First, we develop the interharmonic application specific definitions of the cross bispectrum and the cross bicoherence. The statistical characteristics and frequency domain symmetries are also investigated. We apply the modified cross bispectrum to interharmonic detection problems. Due to their small amplitudes, the detection of interharmonics is sensitive to many undesirable factors such as spectral leakage and measurement error. Our analysis results demonstrate that the detection performance of the conventional DFT-based method is seriously degraded in the presence of noise. Hence, we develop a constant false alarm rate (CFAR) interharmonic detector based on the modified cross bispectrum. Our analysis and experimental results show that our method can provide more robust detection performance than conventional methods in the presence of noise. We also develop an ASD condition monitoring method based on the cross bicoherence. The key idea is to diagnose the status of the load side of an ASD from observations made at the source side. In this dissertation, we apply our method to detection and analysis of phase imbalance at the load side of the ASD. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method provides a unique interharmonic signature for detection and classification of asymmetric impedance associated with the phase imbalance. Furthermore, the proposed method shows a more sensitive detection performance compared to the conventional imbalance measurement method, which enables prognosis of potential faults. A novel quadratic phase coupling detector for a single data record with coherent interharmonics is developed. The traditional bicoherence definition fails when its ’phase randomization’ assumption is not satisfied. This assumption is not appropriate for certain applications such as continuous monitoring of rotating machines. Therefore, we propose a novel quadratic phase coupling detector and compare it with previous techniques. It is shown that our detector is superior to previous detectors at high SNRs, and can also address partially coherent cases which previous approaches could not properly address. Flicker issues related to interharmonics are also discussed. We present a newly found limitation of the current IEC flickermeter regarding detecting flicker caused by low frequency interharmonics. We also present observation results of flicker responses of various lamps including light-emitting-diode (LED) lamps. Our observation results confirm that compact fluorescent and LED lamps are sensitive to high frequency interharmonics, although the IEC flickmeter can not detect flicker caused by such interharmonics. Hence, we develop an alternative flicker detection method based on down-up sampling. Our experiment results show that our method can detect flicker regardless of the value of the interharmonic frequencies. Independent of interharmonic topics, we also present our additional achievement involving application of wavelet denoising techniques to network congestion monitoring problems. This was a collaboration with researchers at the Department of Computer Sciences in the University of Texas at Austin, and mainly completed before becoming engaged in the electric ship project. By applying wavelet techniques, we could drastically enhance shared congestion detection performance over previously proposed methods. / text
30

Test bed system for investigating the energy usage of variable speed drive systems.

Walker, Myles Larcome. January 2001 (has links)
As South Africa's electricity consumption increases, Eskom is promoting Demand Side Management (DSM) to aid control of both the electricity consumption and its more effective usage, thereby delaying the need to construct new power stations, which pose large economic and environmental problems. Eskom has investigated various DSM strategies, such as load shifting, co-generation, alternative fuels and energy efficient processes, and has targeted the areas of load shifting and energy efficiency as prime areas for energy savings as they are relatively inexpensive and easy to implement. Pumps and fans form a large part of the industrial load. By improving the power usage of these devices with the use of variable speed drives, large energy savings may be achieved. To enable the energy usage of industrial loads to be evaluated, a test bed system which enables a variable speed drive to be loaded with a configurable load, was constructed. The test bed system forms a tool for evaluating and demonstrating the energy savings that are possible, by replacing fixed speed drives with variable speed drives when controlling the flow rate of pumps and fans. Results from the test bed system show that by using variable speed operation of pumps and fans, some energy savings are achievable when compared to existing methods of flow control. The achievable energy savings are dependent on the system properties and the duty cycle of the pump or fan system. / Thesis (M.Sc.)-University of Natal, Durban, 2001.

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