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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Generation of combustible gases from agricultural wastes

Osman, Elzamzami Ahmed January 1979 (has links)
No description available.
2

Effects on Iron and Cobalt on Methane Production from Dairy Cattle Manure

Himes, Mark E. 04 1900 (has links) (PDF)
University of Central Florida College of Arts and Sciences Thesis / The effects of iron and cobalt on methanogenesis from dairy cattle manure were studied. Four-liter digestors with 3-liter working volumes were charged daily with dairy manure (4.5% W/V volatile solids) to achieve a 3-day retention time. Digestors were incubated at 37° C and pH 7.0 on a rotary shaker. Duplicate digestors were maintained under the following parameters: controls (no ions added), Co++ at 4.958 mg/liter, Fe++ at 20.64 mg/liter and Fe++ and Co++ at above stated final digestor concentrations. Significantly higher production of biogas and methane occurred with the addition of iron (p= .05). Iron-amended digestors producted 3.88 ± 0.26 liters/liter/day of biogas and 2.03 ± 0.14 liters/liter/day of methane. Control digestors produced 3.59 ± 0.27 liters/liter/day of biogas and 1.85 ± 0.14. Cobalt did not stimulate methanogenesis and may have nullified the stimulating effects of iron. Neither the cobalt nor the iron/cobalt-amended digestors demonstrated increases in biogas or methane production. Iron or cobalt did not affect efficiency of fermentation (liters of methane per gm of volatile solids destroyed) or volatile fatty acid conversion. The total counts of methanogens grown in roll tubes were unaffected by addition of the metals. Methanobrevibacter smithii was isolated from all digestors, however, Methanobacterium formicicum was isolated only from digestors amended with iron. / M.S. / Masters / Arts and Sciences / Microbiology / 57 p. / ix, 57 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm.
3

A preliminary investigation on methane gas production from pear waste

Harnik, George William 06 1900 (has links)
Graduation date: 1948
4

The Technical and Economic Feasibility of Producing Methane from Biomass Using a Leaching-Bed/Packed-Bed Conversion Process

Hinton, Steven W. 04 1900 (has links) (PDF)
University of Central Florida College of Engineering Thesis / The economic feasibility and energy effectiveness of producing pipeline quality methane gas from biomass was assessed for a new and totally unproven process. The biomass feedstock considered was the common aquatic weed water hyacinth and a novel active boom-winch harvesting system is proposed for its collection. The conversion process analyzed is a two stage biological process which utilizes a leaching-bed for the production of volatile acids and a packed-bed for the production of methane gas. In order to determine the feasibility of the proposed process equipment requirements, capital costs and operating/maintenance costs were developed for three system sizes. This data was analyzed using a life cycle cost model to determine pay back period. The results indicate that payoff period will be less than equipment life and that net energy production occurs. Areas where further research would promote the introduction of this technology are identified and discussed. / M.S. / Masters / Engineering / Engineering / 132 p. / xii, 132 leaves, bound : ill. ; 28 cm.
5

Feasibility of a food waste to energy system in high-rise buildings

Tsang, Yuen-lam, Jenny, 曾琬林 January 2013 (has links)
Hong Kong is currently generating more than 3000 tons of food waste every day which generate air pollution problem and create odor nuisance to residents near landfill site. It is critical for us to reduce waste generation at sources and find ways to treat our food waste instead of solely rely on landfill. The aim of this paper is to propose a food waste to energy system to be installed in high-rise buildings which helps save our landfill space and utilize waste energy to generate electricity and heat for building use. It is estimated that around one ton of food waste will be generated from a domestic household building and hence the proposed food waste to energy system is designed to have treatment capacity of 1 ton of food waste per day. A total of 238.1 Nm3 of biogas, with 53.5% methane content can be generated from one ton of food waste. With the use of combined heat and power (CHP) system, 465 kWh of electricity and 732 kWh of heat can be generated. A survey is conducted to assess the public view of the food waste problem in Hong Kong and the proposed food waste to energy system. It is found that most of the respondent agrees the proposed food waste to energy is a good mean to tackle food waste problem in Hong Kong and support to install such system in high-rise buildings. A life cycle assessment is carried out to compare the environmental impact of landfilling 1 ton of food waste and treating 1 ton of food waste with the proposed system. It is found that the carbon emission (CO2 equivalent) of the proposed system is 1112.6 kg less than that of landfilling, i.e. the proposed system can help to save 406.1 ton of carbon dioxide emission a year which equals to planting of 17,656 trees. The economic viability of installing the proposed system is evaluated. The capital investment and the operating cost for the proposed system are estimated to be HK$3,400,000 and HK$ 170,000 per year respectively. As the proposed system can bring in revenue of HK$ 763,986 per year, the internal rate of return (IRR) and payback period of the system is 15% and 6 years respectively. Limitations and difficulties encountered for the installation of the proposed system are discussed and finally suggestions are made for the successful installation of the proposed system and several ways to reduce food waste from sources are also suggested for both commercial sectors and the government. / published_or_final_version / Environmental Management / Master / Master of Science in Environmental Management
6

Corn stalk as a bioenergy resource /

Haney, Paul E., January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2003. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Also available on the Internet.
7

Corn stalk as a bioenergy resource

Haney, Paul E., January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2003. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Also available on the Internet.
8

Compacting biomass waste materials for use as fuel

Zhang, Ou, January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2002. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 240-244). Also available on the Internet.
9

Compacting biomass waste materials for use as fuel /

Zhang, Ou, January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2002. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 240-244). Also available on the Internet.
10

The prospect of waste-to-energy facilities in Hong Kong

Mak, Hoi-ting. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M. Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 2009. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 85-93).

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