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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Built environment education : a feminist critique and reconstruction

Avery, Hinda H. 11 1900 (has links)
This dissertation examines the relationship between built environment education and the discourse which focuses on women in the built environment. It critiques the major built environment education programs in Britain, the United States and Canada, from a feminist art teacher's perspective, showing, with one minor exception, that the spatial and structural needs of women are not taken into account; it presents an overview of the literature concerning women in the built environment; and finally, it demonstrates how community-based women-centred initiatives and issues, as documented in the literature, can, and should be incorporated into built environment elementary and secondary school programs. The principal argument of this dissertation is that the built environment exists predominantly as the expression of an ensconced and inequitable social order. As such, the built environment has resulted, and continues to result in the oppression and subordination of women. By not including the spatial and structural needs of women, within a community-based curriculum, and thereby denying the special circumstances of female students, most built environment education programs reproduce and entrench these exclusionary practices.
2

The opportunities and challenges facing women in senior academic and managerial positions at a particular campus within a merging South African university.

Krishna, Bhavani. January 2007 (has links)
Whilst there has been considerable research that has documented the barriers facing women (Cassimjee, 2003; Holland, 2001; Lyness & Thompson, 2000; De La Rey, 1999;Wood, 1993), little is known about the opportunities facing women, particularly Black women academics/managers, within tertiary institutions. In an attempt to facilitate such insight, the central aim of the study explores the subjective experiences of women academics/managers in terms of their academic development and career trajectory. This qualitative study was conducted within a particular campus within a merging South African university. Using convenience sampling, three women academics (two participants of African descent, one participant of Indian descent) and two managers (one participant of African descent and one of Indian descent) were selected. All interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Inductive thematic analysis was used to analyse the transcribed interviews followed by interpretation of the data, which was informed by the theoretical underpinnings of the study, rooted within the ambit of Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT). The analysis of the subjective experiences of women in this study revealed salient factors relating to the patriarchal nature of the institution of study, the legacy of apartheid and the issue of racism. The lack of overall institutional support and the absence of mentorship programmes were also prevalent. In addition, there emerged a shared ideology that 'academic life was a battle' to be fought. The acquisition of knowledge, constant empowerment and goal orientated behaviour with discipline; boundaries and strategies remained an overall theme to manage hierarchical career growth and development. Balancing work, academic and management roles together with the competing needs around family also posed a challenge. In sum, the implication of the study highlights the need to cultivate a non-racist, gender neutral and logistically supportive environment. / Thesis (M.A.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2007.
3

A case study of educational needs, obstacles and opportunities for girls, women and teachers in remote Pakistan

Chabot, Genevieve Walsh. January 2009 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (EdD)--Montana State University--Bozeman, 2009. / Typescript. Chairperson, Graduate Committee: Elisabeth Swanson. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 134-139).
4

Women's education in Meiji Japan and the development of Christian girls' schools /

Li, Yuk-heung. January 1993 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hong Kong, 1994. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 337-381).
5

'From behind the curtain' a study of girls' madrasa in India /

Winkelmann, Mareike Jule. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Universiteit van Amsterdam, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-172).
6

Wage worth of school training an analytical study of six hundred women-workers in textile factories,

Hedges, Anna Charlotte, January 1915 (has links)
Published also as Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University, 1914. / "Helpful bibliography": 1 p. following p. 173.
7

A study of the educational needs and interests of married women in the rural areas of Eyre Peninsula with reference to their social and educational backgrounds.

Rooth, Sydney John. January 1970 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.Ed.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Education, 1971.
8

Built environment education : a feminist critique and reconstruction

Avery, Hinda H. 11 1900 (has links)
This dissertation examines the relationship between built environment education and the discourse which focuses on women in the built environment. It critiques the major built environment education programs in Britain, the United States and Canada, from a feminist art teacher's perspective, showing, with one minor exception, that the spatial and structural needs of women are not taken into account; it presents an overview of the literature concerning women in the built environment; and finally, it demonstrates how community-based women-centred initiatives and issues, as documented in the literature, can, and should be incorporated into built environment elementary and secondary school programs. The principal argument of this dissertation is that the built environment exists predominantly as the expression of an ensconced and inequitable social order. As such, the built environment has resulted, and continues to result in the oppression and subordination of women. By not including the spatial and structural needs of women, within a community-based curriculum, and thereby denying the special circumstances of female students, most built environment education programs reproduce and entrench these exclusionary practices. / Education, Faculty of / Curriculum and Pedagogy (EDCP), Department of / Graduate
9

Increasing girls' participation in education: understanding the factors affecting parental decision-making in rural Orissa India

Chawla, Deepika January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ed.D.)--Boston University / PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you. / Illiterate women have high levels of fertility and mortality, poor nutritional status, low earning potential, and little autonomy within the household. Yet, large populations of women in many developing countries continue to be illiterate. In India over 11 million girls do not go to school at all and 18 million drop out after grade five. As a result 151 million mothers are likely to be uneducated or minimally educated. Thus the problem is very acute. Issues related to effective demand are widely recognized among policymakers in India as being critical to ensuring the existence of effective demand for education. However, there have been few efforts to analyze the impact of these factors. This study attempts to fill this gap. This study examines the views and beliefs of those who make or influence decisions on behalf of girls that impact continuation of the girls in schools when they reach the age of adolescence. Set in a village in the eastern state of Orissa in India, the study analyzes the opinions of mothers, fathers, village elders, teachers and the girls themselves, and identifies the factors that influence the girls' continuation in the education cycle. The study finds that education and educational decision-making are family matters, and parents are the key decision-makers. While most parents support children going to school, negative parental attitudes toward educating daughters constitute a significant barrier to girls' education. Many parents report that sending daughters to school and educating them above a certain level results in problems finding a suitable groom. Further, educated girls would need to marry educated boys, thereby increasing expectations and demand for dowry. Some also report that girls should be taken out of school at the onset of menarche since then they need closer supervision and parental control. The study findings highlight the importance of effecting changes in parental attitudes about girls' education if meaningful improvements have to be brought about, and offer valuable insights for consideration in developing strategies related to girls' access to and retention in primary schooling. / 2031-01-01
10

Risking Apollo's kiss: stories of academically-talented women teachers naming themselves

Jordan, Lynda Rue Duerksen 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text

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