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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Women's Self-Management of Arm Morbidity After Breast Cancer: A Secondary Data Analysis

Samuel, Vicky Rosine January 2017 (has links)
Background: Arm morbidity continues to impact the lives of many breast cancer survivors long after acute treatments are completed. The most debilitating symptoms of arm morbidity are pain, lymphedema and limitation with range of motion (ROM). As a chronic condition, management of arm morbidity symptoms requires survivors to engage in self-management practices that alleviate symptoms. Objective: To explore self-management practices performed by breast cancer survivors, and the treatments women receive from healthcare practitioners in managing symptoms of arm morbidity. Methods: A secondary analysis of quantitative and qualitative data was undertaken. A descriptive correlational design was used to analyze data from breast cancer survivors (N = 740). Logistic regression identified variables related to self-management that were associated with pain, lymphedema and ROM limitations. A descriptive qualitative design was used to analyze data from a subset of participants (n = 40). Inductive content analysis approach was applied to develop codes, categories and themes related to how women self-manage arm morbidity symptoms and the treatments they received from healthcare providers to manage their arm morbidity. Results: Participants reported ongoing symptoms of pain (24%), lymphedema (21%), and range of motion limitation (34%) 30 to 36 months post-surgery. Pain was associated with experiencing swelling, taking pain medications, and discussing treatments for pain. Lymphedema was associated with swelling and receiving treatment for pain. ROM limitations were associated with swelling, receiving treatment for pain and taking pain medication. Two overarching qualitative themes emerged: 1) physical symptoms self-management, and 2) psychosocial self-management of uncertainty. Themes for treatments options included: rehabilitation and taking medications. Conclusion: Findings highlight that women living with symptoms of arm morbidity require ongoing monitoring and support for self-management, and there is a need for multidisciplinary approaches. Self-management practices reported are in line with the current lymphedema guidelines, however, the complexities associated with self-management practices can be burdensome to women. Chronic pain and ROM limitation necessitates further investigation to understand their cause and develop management strategies. Oncology nurses are well positioned to implement survivorship care plans that address survivorship needs with multidisciplinary teams and primary healthcare practitioners when women with breast cancer transition from acute cancer care to home. Future research is needed to provide an in depth understanding of self-management of arm morbidity in breast cancer survivors.
2

Constructing understandings, renegotiating lives : women's experiences of arm morbidity after breast cancer

Schell, Kara 19 January 2009
This research explores womens experiences of arm morbidity after breast cancer. Biomedical knowledge about arm morbidity is limited and often unclear, and there has been even less focus on the health issue from a sociological perspective. While studies do exist about the experiences of arm morbidity, more investigation is required to realize its influence on the daily lives of breast cancer survivors. The purpose of my research is to convey constructed meanings of arm morbidity experiences to indicate the impact it has on womens everyday lives.<p> Qualitative data were collected via twelve in-depth, semi-structured interviews, as six participants were each interviewed twice. The interviews were focused on a broad range of themes in order to create a comprehensive understanding of the womens experiences of arm morbidity in their daily lives. Phenomenological and feminist approaches were both used to guide the research process and analyze the data, and a range of sociological ideas also informed the analysis, such as chronic illness, disability, gender roles, and embodiment.<p> The illness narratives produced two broad areas relevant to the womens experiences. The first major topic involves the meanings directly related to experiences of arm morbidity as a health issue, and is divided into four themes: 1) experiencing bodies with arm morbidity, 2) treatment, 3) information and knowledge, and 4) support. The second major topic involves understandings of arm morbidity as it affects the womens lives, in which three themes emerge: 1) changing abilities and adjusting roles, 2) identity and health, and 3) the influence of illness on approaches to life.<p> As existing research is sparse, the womens narratives present a new level of depth to understandings of arm morbidity experiences that does not exist in current literature. It is evident that more study about arm morbidity is necessary to construct important knowledge and benefit both biological and sociological understandings of this survivorship issue.
3

Constructing understandings, renegotiating lives : women's experiences of arm morbidity after breast cancer

Schell, Kara 19 January 2009 (has links)
This research explores womens experiences of arm morbidity after breast cancer. Biomedical knowledge about arm morbidity is limited and often unclear, and there has been even less focus on the health issue from a sociological perspective. While studies do exist about the experiences of arm morbidity, more investigation is required to realize its influence on the daily lives of breast cancer survivors. The purpose of my research is to convey constructed meanings of arm morbidity experiences to indicate the impact it has on womens everyday lives.<p> Qualitative data were collected via twelve in-depth, semi-structured interviews, as six participants were each interviewed twice. The interviews were focused on a broad range of themes in order to create a comprehensive understanding of the womens experiences of arm morbidity in their daily lives. Phenomenological and feminist approaches were both used to guide the research process and analyze the data, and a range of sociological ideas also informed the analysis, such as chronic illness, disability, gender roles, and embodiment.<p> The illness narratives produced two broad areas relevant to the womens experiences. The first major topic involves the meanings directly related to experiences of arm morbidity as a health issue, and is divided into four themes: 1) experiencing bodies with arm morbidity, 2) treatment, 3) information and knowledge, and 4) support. The second major topic involves understandings of arm morbidity as it affects the womens lives, in which three themes emerge: 1) changing abilities and adjusting roles, 2) identity and health, and 3) the influence of illness on approaches to life.<p> As existing research is sparse, the womens narratives present a new level of depth to understandings of arm morbidity experiences that does not exist in current literature. It is evident that more study about arm morbidity is necessary to construct important knowledge and benefit both biological and sociological understandings of this survivorship issue.

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