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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Using patterns in conceptual modeling of business activities

He, Feihu 11 1900 (has links)
Patterns are used as building blocks for design and construction in many fields such as architecture, music, literature, etc. Researchers and practitioners in the information systems area have been exploring patterns and using them in system analysis and design. Patterns found in the analysis stage, when analysts create conceptual models to abstractly represent domain reality, are call business patterns or analysis patterns. Although various business patterns were proposed in previous studies, we found that business semantics were missing in these patterns. These business patterns failed to show functionalities that is essential to patterns in general. Most of these patterns were also not capable of describing business activities, the dynamic aspect of business. This study is conducted to address these issues. In this thesis, we provide a brief literature review on business patterns, and discuss the major problems we found in these studies. Then we introduce our research approach and the major outcomes. We propose a new definition of business patterns with business semantics, which enables us to recover the missing functionality in business patterns. We suggest the key elements to represent business patterns, and propose a two-level template (functional and operational) to describe these elements. Based on theR²M approach, we propose a modeling method with graphical notations to describe the operational level of patterns, where business activities can be modeled. Examples and a case study are provided in this thesis to demonstrate how to use the modeling method and how to use business patterns in practice.
2

Using patterns in conceptual modeling of business activities

He, Feihu 11 1900 (has links)
Patterns are used as building blocks for design and construction in many fields such as architecture, music, literature, etc. Researchers and practitioners in the information systems area have been exploring patterns and using them in system analysis and design. Patterns found in the analysis stage, when analysts create conceptual models to abstractly represent domain reality, are call business patterns or analysis patterns. Although various business patterns were proposed in previous studies, we found that business semantics were missing in these patterns. These business patterns failed to show functionalities that is essential to patterns in general. Most of these patterns were also not capable of describing business activities, the dynamic aspect of business. This study is conducted to address these issues. In this thesis, we provide a brief literature review on business patterns, and discuss the major problems we found in these studies. Then we introduce our research approach and the major outcomes. We propose a new definition of business patterns with business semantics, which enables us to recover the missing functionality in business patterns. We suggest the key elements to represent business patterns, and propose a two-level template (functional and operational) to describe these elements. Based on theR²M approach, we propose a modeling method with graphical notations to describe the operational level of patterns, where business activities can be modeled. Examples and a case study are provided in this thesis to demonstrate how to use the modeling method and how to use business patterns in practice.
3

Using patterns in conceptual modeling of business activities

He, Feihu 11 1900 (has links)
Patterns are used as building blocks for design and construction in many fields such as architecture, music, literature, etc. Researchers and practitioners in the information systems area have been exploring patterns and using them in system analysis and design. Patterns found in the analysis stage, when analysts create conceptual models to abstractly represent domain reality, are call business patterns or analysis patterns. Although various business patterns were proposed in previous studies, we found that business semantics were missing in these patterns. These business patterns failed to show functionalities that is essential to patterns in general. Most of these patterns were also not capable of describing business activities, the dynamic aspect of business. This study is conducted to address these issues. In this thesis, we provide a brief literature review on business patterns, and discuss the major problems we found in these studies. Then we introduce our research approach and the major outcomes. We propose a new definition of business patterns with business semantics, which enables us to recover the missing functionality in business patterns. We suggest the key elements to represent business patterns, and propose a two-level template (functional and operational) to describe these elements. Based on theR²M approach, we propose a modeling method with graphical notations to describe the operational level of patterns, where business activities can be modeled. Examples and a case study are provided in this thesis to demonstrate how to use the modeling method and how to use business patterns in practice. / Business, Sauder School of / Management Information Systems, Division of / Graduate
4

Web services infrastructure for e-marketplaces based on business patterns

El-Shanta, Eltaher Mohamed January 2003 (has links)
This thesis presents a Web services implementation of the infrastructure for e-Marketplaces based on e-Marketplace business patterns. Business patterns implemented by the infrastructure include User-to-Business, User-to-Online Buying, User-to-User, and Business-to-Business integration. The implementation of the User-to-Business pattern provides for all non-commercial user transactions with the e-Marketplace, including the registration processes, aggregating the e-Marketplace catalog with product and service offers, response to requests for quote, and purchase order checking and processing. The implementation of the User-to-Online Buying pattern provides for all commercial transactions that a user may conduct with the e-Marketplace, including catalog-based buying, contract-based buying, auction bidding, exchange bid offering, and the publication of requests for quote. The implementation of the User-to-User pattern supports e-Marketplace user communication. The implementation of the Business-to-Business integration pattern enables commerce systems of the suppliers and procurement systems of the buyers to integrate with the e-Marketplace to conduct commerce and non-commerce transactions. <br><br> The implemented e-Marketplace infrastructure provides a foundation for building concrete e-Marketplaces, by e-Marketplace builders, to present the e-Marketplace functionalities to the end users such as e-Marketplace administrators and traders. The infrastructure is implemented using Web services technology to provide system-independent accessibility to clients of concrete e-Marketplaces that are built on the infrastructure. The infrastructure implements the business patterns in the form of groups of collaborating Web services.
5

The Use of Patterns in Information System Engineering

Backlund, Per January 2001 (has links)
<p>The aims of this dissertation are to investigate the use and usefulness of patterns in Information Systems Engineering and to identify future areas of research. In order to do this there is a need to survey different types of patterns and find a common concept of patterns. A pattern is based on experience found in the real world. A text or a model or a combination of the both can describe the pattern. A pattern is typically described in terms of context, forces, problem, and solution. These can be explicitly expressed or implicitly found in the description of the pattern.</p><p>The types of patterns dealt with are: object-oriented patterns; design patterns, analysis patterns; data model patterns; domain patterns; business patterns; workflow patterns and the deontic pattern. The different types of patterns are presented using the authors' own terminology.</p><p>The patterns described in the survey are classified with respect to different aspects. The intention of this analysis is to form a taxonomy for patterns and to bring order into the vast amount of patterns. This is an important step in order to find out how patterns are used and can be used in Information Systems Engineering. The aspects used in the classification are: level of abstraction; text or model emphasis; product or process emphasis; life cycle stage usage and combinations of these aspects.</p><p>Finally an outline for future areas of research is presented. The areas that have been considered of interest are: patterns and Information Systems Engineering methods; patterns and tools (tool support for patterns); patterns as a pedagogical aid; the extraction and documentation of patterns and patterns and novel applications of information technology. Each future area of research is sketched out.</p>
6

The Use of Patterns in Information System Engineering

Backlund, Per January 2001 (has links)
The aims of this dissertation are to investigate the use and usefulness of patterns in Information Systems Engineering and to identify future areas of research. In order to do this there is a need to survey different types of patterns and find a common concept of patterns. A pattern is based on experience found in the real world. A text or a model or a combination of the both can describe the pattern. A pattern is typically described in terms of context, forces, problem, and solution. These can be explicitly expressed or implicitly found in the description of the pattern. The types of patterns dealt with are: object-oriented patterns; design patterns, analysis patterns; data model patterns; domain patterns; business patterns; workflow patterns and the deontic pattern. The different types of patterns are presented using the authors' own terminology. The patterns described in the survey are classified with respect to different aspects. The intention of this analysis is to form a taxonomy for patterns and to bring order into the vast amount of patterns. This is an important step in order to find out how patterns are used and can be used in Information Systems Engineering. The aspects used in the classification are: level of abstraction; text or model emphasis; product or process emphasis; life cycle stage usage and combinations of these aspects. Finally an outline for future areas of research is presented. The areas that have been considered of interest are: patterns and Information Systems Engineering methods; patterns and tools (tool support for patterns); patterns as a pedagogical aid; the extraction and documentation of patterns and patterns and novel applications of information technology. Each future area of research is sketched out.

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