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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Sustainability of Funding for Dual Credit Programs an Analysis of the State Governance Structure and Funding Models' Impact on Tuition Revenue from 2013-2016

McCraw, Brandi 03 May 2019 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to assess the sustainability of dual credit programs from 2013-2016 across U.S. public community and junior colleges and the effect of 2 funding variables associated with these course offerings. The literature postulated that dual credit programs have continued to grow in demand since their origin with no indication of decreasing in the near future. The researcher chose 2 funding mechanisms to associate with dual credit enrollment: governance structure of the state and the state funding model as it pertains to dual credit enrollment. Tuition revenue totals were extracted from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System for each fall semester from 2013-2016. This data set included 48 states in the U.S. The only non-reporting states were Alaska, Delaware, and The District of Columbia. This study uses a quantitative approach to determine if state governance structure and state funding model had an impact on tuition revenue. The statistics computed included an Independent Samples T-test. In summary, the analysis did support the research hypothesis in that there was statistically significant differences based on the governance structure of the state for the years of 2013 and 2014, but not years 2015 and 2016. The analysis did not support the research hypothesis in that there were no statistically significant differences based on the state funding model in tuition revenue derived from enrollment. Limitations in the current study that may have influenced the outcome of the analysis and recommendations for further studies are discussed.
2

High School/College Transitions: A Case Study Examining the Impact of a Dual Credit Program at Fleming College

Philpott-Skilton, Linda 09 August 2013 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to explore how Dual Credit (DC) programs at Ontario high schools impacted the persistence of students when they are in college and what specific features of these programs affected the participating students’ academic performance. This study focused on the Dual Credit students enrolled full-time at Sir Sandford Fleming College who successfully completed one full-time semester of academic study. Fleming College is one of the 24 Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts & Technology. This was a case study based on both qualitative and quantitative data collected by a number of methods including survey questionnaires, audio-recorded phone and face-to-face interviews, and document analysis. There were a number of findings related to persistence at College. For example, the DC student group persisted at the same rate as did all College students and DC students who enrolled in a College program that was “related” to their DC program were more likely to persist at college. Although there was no attempt to compare the data for the two groups because of uncontrollable variables, this study found that DC students (as a group) did not achieve academically quite at the same level, as did all Fleming College students. However, considering that the DC target group was “at risk” students, the overall academic achievement (64%) of the DC students (2011) was similar to the academic achievement of all College students (68%). The participants in this study recommended that the DC program be as much like college as possible. This study supports previous research, which indicates that the DC courses should be delivered at the college campus (rather than in the high school) and DC students should be integrated with other college students. Although this was a case study of DC students at only one Ontario College and the findings are not generalizable to other sites, the findings of this study will partially address a gap in the research literature and add to the body of knowledge about the impact of DC programs in the areas of student engagement, integration and persistence with respect to DC programs elsewhere.
3

High School/College Transitions: A Case Study Examining the Impact of a Dual Credit Program at Fleming College

Philpott-Skilton, Linda 09 August 2013 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to explore how Dual Credit (DC) programs at Ontario high schools impacted the persistence of students when they are in college and what specific features of these programs affected the participating students’ academic performance. This study focused on the Dual Credit students enrolled full-time at Sir Sandford Fleming College who successfully completed one full-time semester of academic study. Fleming College is one of the 24 Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts & Technology. This was a case study based on both qualitative and quantitative data collected by a number of methods including survey questionnaires, audio-recorded phone and face-to-face interviews, and document analysis. There were a number of findings related to persistence at College. For example, the DC student group persisted at the same rate as did all College students and DC students who enrolled in a College program that was “related” to their DC program were more likely to persist at college. Although there was no attempt to compare the data for the two groups because of uncontrollable variables, this study found that DC students (as a group) did not achieve academically quite at the same level, as did all Fleming College students. However, considering that the DC target group was “at risk” students, the overall academic achievement (64%) of the DC students (2011) was similar to the academic achievement of all College students (68%). The participants in this study recommended that the DC program be as much like college as possible. This study supports previous research, which indicates that the DC courses should be delivered at the college campus (rather than in the high school) and DC students should be integrated with other college students. Although this was a case study of DC students at only one Ontario College and the findings are not generalizable to other sites, the findings of this study will partially address a gap in the research literature and add to the body of knowledge about the impact of DC programs in the areas of student engagement, integration and persistence with respect to DC programs elsewhere.
4

The Impact of Dual Credit on College Access and Participation: An Ontario Cae Study

Whitaker, Christopher 26 August 2011 (has links)
The purpose of the study is to better understand the extent to which dual credit contributes to increased access and participation in college. As an initiative to facilitate the transition from high school to college for many students, dual credit has grown in scale and popularity in Ontario in recent years. By giving participating students credit towards both secondary school and college, dual credit is seen as a particularly effective mechanism in assisting disengaged students and groups under-represented in postsecondary education achieve success in high school and college. Still at an early stage of implementation in Ontario, little formal research has been conducted to explore the elements contributing to the program’s success and the benefits and outcomes for participants. Through the use of mixed methods of research, the study explores from a case study perspective the experience of dual credit at a single Ontario college in collaboration with its local partner school boards. Research methods include examination of student grades, policy and program documentation; student and parent surveys; and interviews with staff involved in planning and delivery. The analysis is informed by conceptual frameworks of student change allowing for consideration of a broad range of variables. Results of the study revealed that dual credit was deemed to be a success by students, parents and staff involved with the programs. Dual credit was viewed as particularly effective in terms of academic benefits and creating a greater awareness of college, contributing to student confidence and leading to increased likelihood of college participation. Dual credit participants were found to be primarily middle achievers academically, tended to perform better in dual credit courses than in high school, and obtained slightly higher grades than college peers in the same courses. Given the program delivery models studied, it was concluded that middle achievers were likely to benefit most. The study also concluded that student characteristics including pre-existing confidence and motivation should be considered an important element of success along with program elements and institutional factors. As an innovative program demonstrating positive results, more research should be done to assist in developing dual credit further.
5

The Impact of Dual Credit on College Access and Participation: An Ontario Cae Study

Whitaker, Christopher 26 August 2011 (has links)
The purpose of the study is to better understand the extent to which dual credit contributes to increased access and participation in college. As an initiative to facilitate the transition from high school to college for many students, dual credit has grown in scale and popularity in Ontario in recent years. By giving participating students credit towards both secondary school and college, dual credit is seen as a particularly effective mechanism in assisting disengaged students and groups under-represented in postsecondary education achieve success in high school and college. Still at an early stage of implementation in Ontario, little formal research has been conducted to explore the elements contributing to the program’s success and the benefits and outcomes for participants. Through the use of mixed methods of research, the study explores from a case study perspective the experience of dual credit at a single Ontario college in collaboration with its local partner school boards. Research methods include examination of student grades, policy and program documentation; student and parent surveys; and interviews with staff involved in planning and delivery. The analysis is informed by conceptual frameworks of student change allowing for consideration of a broad range of variables. Results of the study revealed that dual credit was deemed to be a success by students, parents and staff involved with the programs. Dual credit was viewed as particularly effective in terms of academic benefits and creating a greater awareness of college, contributing to student confidence and leading to increased likelihood of college participation. Dual credit participants were found to be primarily middle achievers academically, tended to perform better in dual credit courses than in high school, and obtained slightly higher grades than college peers in the same courses. Given the program delivery models studied, it was concluded that middle achievers were likely to benefit most. The study also concluded that student characteristics including pre-existing confidence and motivation should be considered an important element of success along with program elements and institutional factors. As an innovative program demonstrating positive results, more research should be done to assist in developing dual credit further.
6

Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy

Neely, Alanna L. 16 December 2013 (has links)
The purpose of this correlational and descriptive study was to examine the influence of an agricultural dual credit course curriculum on student self-efficacy of college readiness as students matriculate to post-secondary education. To evaluate the personal characteristics, postsecondary plans, program perceptions and college readiness self-efficacy, a quantitative survey and online instrument was used to gather data and analyze information on high school students enrolled in agricultural education in both dual credit and non-dual credit courses primarily in the Middle Tennessee Region. The target population (N = 543) for this study was defined as students at 16 schools where the dual credit course was offered with the Middle Tennessee State University, School of Agribusiness and Agriscience in the 2011-2012 academic year. A total of 245 students from 16 secondary agricultural programs in seven different school districts across Tennessee, primarily in the Middle Tennessee region, participated in the study for a response rate of approximately 45%. This study examined college readiness of student participation in an agricultural dual credit course and sought to determine the relationship between student participation in a dual credit course offering and college readiness self-efficacy as well as student perceptions of the course offering. Course self-efficacy was higher among dual credit participants versus non-dual credit participants. Social self-efficacy was also higher for dual credit participants. Females had higher Course self-efficacy, and there was a positive relationship between GPA and each construct of the college readiness self-efficacy inventory. Participant perceptions of the agricultural dual credit program were also high. This study indicates that dual credit participants can confidently approach post-secondary options, and that they are more likely to be successful in college due to level of self-efficacy as they matriculate into college. Recommendations from the study include: Using the MTSU dual credit model in future dual credit course developments and collaborations; using findings as a basis for training future agricultural education teachers on how to improve CRSE; and additional and longitudinal studies to track dual credit students’ success in college.
7

Exploring the Relationship Between Dual Credit Experience and Self-Efficacy: The Perspective of First-Generation College Students

Kiemele, Laura Marie January 2020 (has links)
Dual credit options allow high school students to enter college with college credits earned, as well as gain lived experience of the role expectations, academic rigor, and time it takes to complete college-level work. While past studies have identified benefits of dual credit for first-generation college students in particular, few have investigated the nature of that relationship. This qualitative study examined the relationship between first-generation students’ dual credit experiences and academic self-efficacy. Interviews were conducted with three first-generation college students in fall 2019. Findings indicate first-generation students who engage in a rigorous dual credit experience that results in mastery experience are more prepared for the academic expectations of college, master the role of a student, and perceive an increase in academic self-efficacy. This experience may provide first-generation students with knowledge and transition skills for college that their continuing generation peers find elsewhere. Implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.
8

<b>CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT (CE) INSTRUCTORS AND THE FALLOUT OF THE HIGHER LEARNING COMMISSION CE CREDENTIALING CLARIFICATION</b>

Mark E Schneider (18172273) 18 March 2024 (has links)
<p dir="ltr">The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) clarified and revised the credentialing standards for concurrent enrollment (CE) instructors of liberal arts courses in 2015 with an implementation date of 2017. With the revised credentialing standards resulting in roughly two out every three CE instructors needing additional graduate level coursework to maintain their CE credentials, HLC created a five-year grace period, followed by multiple extensions, for CE instructors to update their credentials. However, during this period only approximately half of the CE instructors completed the additional coursework. The possible loss of half of the total number of liberal arts CE instructors under HLC accreditation places many CE programs’ sustainability in jeopardy.</p><p dir="ltr">This dissertation encompasses two studies that investigated why CE instructors did or did not complete the additional coursework needed to maintain the CE credentials, a topic that has yet to be explored in research. The first study investigated the issue directly from the CE instructor perspective. The second study on the topic was approached through the lens of CE high school administrators. Principal-agent theory was the theorical framework from which data and findings were viewed and produced. Implications for the CE field, future research angles on the topic, and policy recommendations are offered.</p>
9

Exploring dual credit data alignment, student populations, and coursework patterns in Texas using a P-16 framework

Eklund, Julie Ann 04 February 2010 (has links)
This multi-faceted study of dual credit programs in Texas was motivated by perceived discrepancies in dual credit data reporting and a lack of comprehensive, statelevel information about dual credit student populations and coursework patterns. Using a P-16 framework, the author explored alignment issues that influence the delivery of dual credit programs and the tracking of dual credit participants in Texas. A review of dual credit partnership agreements between high schools and colleges, an analysis of dual credit course crosswalks, interviews with secondary and postsecondary dual credit coordinators, and a cross-agency analysis of state-level dual credit data provided insight into data and program alignment concerns. These research efforts informed the construction of a database of 2004-2007 Texas public high school graduates who took dual credit courses while in high school. Demographic differences and college outcomes were analyzed for the full cohort and cohort subpopulations. Two ANOVAs were used to explore differences in the number of dual credit courses students took and freshman college GPA by several demographic and outcome variables. Study results showed regional differences in dual credit coursetaking patterns and differences in student populations who took academic dual credit courses, non-academic dual credit courses, and both types of courses. Longitudinal data revealed differences in dual credit coursetaking populations over time, including growth in the number of economically disadvantaged and underrepresented minority students who took advantage of dual credit opportunities. Study findings emphasized the value of improving dual credit data reporting and course alignment practices. Important state-level goals were identified as ensuring: that students have access to rigorous, quality programs; that educators and policy-makers have access to accurate data; and that dual credit partnerships maintain the flexibility to innovate and respond to student needs while preserving program quality and equity. / text
10

College credit in high school : an examination of the impact of dual credit on college success and completion in Texas

Garbee, Kelty T. 08 September 2015 (has links)
Dual credit, which allows students to simultaneously earn high school and college credit for the same course, is widely-implemented across the country. Dual credit is thought to promote student success in higher education. However, there is limited research on whether dual credit courses taken in high school positively influence college-level outcomes. Using Ordinary Least Squares and Logistic analysis to control for student background characteristics, this study examines the relationship between dual credit and student success in college, specifically freshman grade point average and college graduation. The study examines an existing dataset from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board that includes approximately 35,870 students. Results suggest that dual credit positively influences college outcomes. / text

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