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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Bounds on quantities of physical interest

Wakefield, M. A. January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
2

Accuracy driven adaptive nonlinear analysis of planar framed structures

Chew, Alvin January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
3

Error estimates for finite element approximations of effective elastic properties of periodic structures / Feluppskattningar för finita element-approximationer av effektiva elastiska egenskaper hos periodiska strukturer

Pettersson, Klas January 2010 (has links)
<p>Techniques for a posteriori error estimation for finite element approximations of an elliptic partial differential equation are studied.This extends previous work on localized error control in finite element methods for linear elasticity.The methods are then applied to the problem of homogenization of periodic structures. In particular, error estimates for the effective elastic properties are obtained. The usefulness of these estimates is twofold.First, adaptive methods using mesh refinements based on the estimates can be constructed.Secondly, one of the estimates can give reasonable measure of the magnitude ofthe error. Numerical examples of this are given.</p>
4

Error estimates for finite element approximations of effective elastic properties of periodic structures / Feluppskattningar för finita element-approximationer av effektiva elastiska egenskaper hos periodiska strukturer

Pettersson, Klas January 2010 (has links)
Techniques for a posteriori error estimation for finite element approximations of an elliptic partial differential equation are studied.This extends previous work on localized error control in finite element methods for linear elasticity.The methods are then applied to the problem of homogenization of periodic structures. In particular, error estimates for the effective elastic properties are obtained. The usefulness of these estimates is twofold.First, adaptive methods using mesh refinements based on the estimates can be constructed.Secondly, one of the estimates can give reasonable measure of the magnitude ofthe error. Numerical examples of this are given.
5

Error Transport Equations for Unsteady Discontinuous Applications

Ganotaki, Michael 02 April 2024 (has links)
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been pivotal in scientific computing, providing critical insights into complex fluid dynamics unattainable through traditional experimental methods. Despite its widespread use, the accuracy of CFD results remains contingent upon the underlying modeling and numerical errors. A key aspect of ensuring simulation reliability is the accurate quantification of discretization error (DE), which is the difference between the simulation solution and the exact solution in the physical world. This study addresses quantifying DE through Error Transport Equations (ETE), which are an additional set of equations capable of quantifying the local DE in a solution. Historically, Richardson extrapolation has been a mainstay for DE estimation due to its simplicity and effectiveness. However, the method's feasibility diminishes with increasing computational demands, particularly in large-scale and high-dimensional problems. The integration of ETE into existing CFD frameworks is facilitated by their compatibility with existing numerical codes, minimizing the need for extensive code modification. By incorporating techniques developed for managing discontinuities, the study broadens ETE applicability to a wider range of scientific computing applications, particularly those involving complex, unsteady flows. The culmination of this research is demonstrated on unsteady discontinuous problems, such as Sod's problem. / Master of Science / In the ever-evolving field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the quest for accuracy is paramount. This thesis focuses on discretization error estimation within CFD simulations, specifically on the challenge of predicting fluid behavior in scenarios marked by sudden changes, such as shock waves. At the core of this work lies an error estimation tool known as Error Transport Equations (ETE) to improve the numerical accuracy of simulations involving unsteady flows and discontinuities. Traditionally, the accuracy of CFD simulations has been limited by discretization errors, generally the largest numerical error, which is the difference between the numerical solution and the exact solution. With ETE, this research identifies these errors to enhance the simulation's overall accuracy. The implications of ETE research are far-reaching. Improved error estimation and correction methods can lead to more reliable predictions in a wide range of applications, from aeronautical engineering, where the aerodynamics of aircraft is critical, to plasma science, with applications in fusion and deep space propulsion.
6

On Numerical Error Estimation for the Finite-Volume Method with an Application to Computational Fluid Dynamics

Tyson, William Conrad 29 November 2018 (has links)
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can provide tremendous insight into complex physical processes and are often faster and more cost-effective to execute than experiments. However, each CFD result inherently contains numerical errors that can significantly degrade the accuracy of a simulation. Discretization error is typically the largest contributor to the overall numerical error in a given simulation. Discretization error can be very difficult to estimate since the generation, transport, and diffusion of these errors is a highly nonlinear function of the computational grid and discretization scheme. As CFD is increasingly used in engineering design and analysis, it is imperative that CFD practitioners be able to accurately quantify discretization errors to minimize risk and improve the performance of engineering systems. In this work, improvements are made to the accuracy and efficiency of existing error estimation techniques. Discretization error is estimated by deriving and solving an error transport equation (ETE) for the local discretization error everywhere in the computational domain. Truncation error is shown to act as the local source for discretization error in numerical solutions. An equivalence between adjoint methods and ETE methods for functional error estimation is presented. This adjoint/ETE equivalence is exploited to efficiently obtain error estimates for multiple output functionals and to extend the higher-order properties of adjoint methods to ETE methods. Higher-order discretization error estimates are obtained when truncation error estimates are sufficiently accurate. Truncation error estimates are demonstrated to deteriorate on grids with a non-smooth variation in grid metrics (e.g., unstructured grids) regardless of how smooth the underlying exact solution may be. The loss of accuracy is shown to stem from noise in the discrete solution on the order of discretization error. When using conventional least-squares reconstruction techniques, this noise is exactly captured and introduces a lower-order error into the truncation error estimate. A novel reconstruction method based on polyharmonic smoothing splines is developed to smoothly reconstruct the discrete solution and improve the accuracy of error estimates. Furthermore, a method for iteratively improving discretization error estimates is devised. Efficiency and robustness considerations are discussed. Results are presented for several inviscid and viscous flow problems. To facilitate the study of discretization error estimation, a new, higher-order finite-volume solver is developed. A detailed description of the code base is provided along with a discussion of best practices for CFD code design. / Ph. D. / Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a branch of computational physics at the intersection of fluid mechanics and scientific computing in which the governing equations of fluid motion, such as the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, are solved numerically on a computer. CFD is utilized in numerous fields including biomedical engineering, meteorology, oceanography, and aerospace engineering. CFD simulations can provide tremendous insight into physical processes and are often preferred over experiments because they can be performed more quickly, are typically more cost-effective, and can provide data in regions where it may be difficult to measure. While CFD can be an extremely powerful tool, CFD simulations are inherently subject to numerical errors. These errors, which are generated when the governing equations of fluid motion are solved on a computer, can have a significant impact on the accuracy of a CFD solution. If numerical errors are not accurately quantified, ill-informed decision-making can lead to poor system performance, increased risk of injury, or even system failure. In this work, research efforts are focused on numerical error estimation for the finite -volume method, arguably the most widely used numerical algorithm for solving CFD problems. The error estimation techniques provided herein target discretization error, the largest contributor to the overall numerical error in a given simulation. Discretization error can be very difficult to estimate since these errors are generated, convected, and diffused by the same physical processes embedded in the governing equations. In this work, improvements are made to the accuracy and efficiency of existing discretization error estimation techniques. Results are presented for several inviscid and viscous flow problems. To facilitate the study of these error estimators, a new, higher-order finite -volume solver is developed. A detailed description of the code base is provided along with a discussion of best practices for CFD code design.
7

On goal-oriented error estimation and adaptivity for nonlinear systems with uncertain data and application to flow problems

Bryant, Corey Michael 09 February 2015 (has links)
The objective of this work is to develop a posteriori error estimates and adaptive strategies for the numerical solution to nonlinear systems of partial differential equations with uncertain data. Areas of application cover problems in fluid mechanics including a Bayesian model selection study of turbulence comparing different uncertainty models. Accounting for uncertainties in model parameters may significantly increase the computational time when simulating complex problems. The premise is that using error estimates and adaptively refining the solution process can reduce the cost of such simulations while preserving their accuracy within some tolerance. New insights for goal-oriented error estimation for deterministic nonlinear problems are first presented. Linearization of the adjoint problems and quantities of interest introduces higher-order terms in the error representation that are generally neglected. Their effects on goal-oriented adaptive strategies are investigated in detail here. Contributions on that subject include extensions of well-known theoretical results for linear problems to the nonlinear setting, computational studies in support of these results, and an extensive comparative study of goal-oriented adaptive schemes that do, and do not, include the higher-order terms. Approaches for goal-oriented error estimation for PDEs with uncertain coefficients have already been presented, but lack the capability of distinguishing between the different sources of error. A novel approach is proposed here, that decomposes the error estimate into contributions from the physical discretization and the uncertainty approximation. Theoretical bounds are proven and numerical examples are presented to verify that the approach identifies the predominant source of the error in a surrogate model. Adaptive strategies, that use this error decomposition and refine the approximation space accordingly, are designed and tested. All methodologies are demonstrated on benchmark flow problems: Stokes lid-driven cavity, 1D Burger’s equation, 2D incompressible flows at low Reynolds numbers. The procedure is also applied to an uncertainty quantification study of RANS turbulence models in channel flows. Adaptive surrogate models are constructed to make parameter uncertainty propagation more efficient. Using surrogate models and adaptivity in a Bayesian model selection procedure, it is shown that significant computational savings can be gained over the full RANS model while maintaining similar accuracy in the predictions. / text
8

Evaluating Query Estimation Errors Using Bootstrap Sampling

Cal, Semih 29 July 2021 (has links)
No description available.
9

Computing Bounds for Linear Functionals of Exact Weak Solutions to Poisson’s Equation

Sauer-Budge, A.M., Huerta, A., Bonet, J., Peraire, Jaime 01 1900 (has links)
We present a method for Poisson’s equation that computes guaranteed upper and lower bounds for the values of linear functional outputs of the exact weak solution of the infinite dimensional continuum problem using traditional finite element approximations. The guarantee holds uniformly for any level of refinement, not just in the asymptotic limit of refinement. Given a finite element solution and its output adjoint solution, the method can be used to provide a certificate of precision for the output with an asymptotic complexity which is linear in the number of elements in the finite element discretization. / Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA)
10

Finite Element Output Bounds for a Stabilized Discretization of Incompressible Stokes Flow

Peraire, Jaime, Budge, Alexander M. 01 1900 (has links)
We introduce a new method for computing a posteriori bounds on engineering outputs from finite element discretizations of the incompressible Stokes equations. The method results from recasting the output problem as a minimization statement without resorting to an error formulation. The minimization statement engenders a duality relationship which we solve approximately by Lagrangian relaxation. We demonstrate the method for a stabilized equal-order approximation of Stokes flow, a problem to which previous output bounding methods do not apply. The conceptual framework for the method is quite general and shows promise for application to stabilized nonlinear problems, such as Burger's equation and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, as well as potential for compressible flow problems. / Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA)

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