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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Evaluation of enteral feeding support in mechanically ventilated, critically-ill patients

Lee, Kit-yue, Samson. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.P.H.)--University of Hong Kong, 2008. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 19-21).
12

The effect of two models of anticipatory care on success of breastfeeding and maternal perception of the infant

Smit, Eileen Marquardt. January 1977 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Wisconsin. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 74-77).
13

Achievement motivation and perception of breastfeeding problems associated with duration of breastfeeding

Hackbarth, Kim T. January 1982 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1982. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-75).
14

History of Infant Feeding: Continual Change

Royse, Caitlin 15 February 2018 (has links)
A paper submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix, History of Medicine course.
15

The effect of antenatal preparation and postnatal support on breast feeding in a group of Johannesburg mothers between January 1983 and November 1984.

Taback, Adele Ethne January 1991 (has links)
In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE in the subject MIDWIFERY at the UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND / This study was conducted in order to draw a profile of the breast feeding practices of a group of White Johannesburg mothers and to ascertain whether factors such as antenatal preparation and postnatal support could be linked to breast feeding success or failure. For the purpose of this study the breast feeding experience was considered successful if the baby was breast fed for 3 months or more. An interview schedule was drawn up and 200 mothers were interviewed over an eighteen month period when they brought their babies to the Municipal Health Clinic for immunisations. the results of this survey showed that less than 50% of the sample were still breast feeding at 3 months. The profile of the successtul breast feeder that emerged was the following:- English speaking, comes from the higher social class and income bracket. has breast fed a previous baby successfully. (Abbreviation abstract) / Andrew Chakane 2019
16

Comparison of two nutrient admixtures for total parenteral nutrition

Aguzzi, Anna January 1993 (has links)
No description available.
17

Positioning and attachment of a newborn baby at the breast /

Henderson, Ann M. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (PhDNursing)--University of South Australia, 2002.
18

Change in practice used to quantify breast milk intake of pre-term infants in a neonatal intensive care unit test-weighing to "Salt Lake City Feed Plan"/

Treloar, Allison Kirsch. January 2009 (has links) (PDF)
Professional paper (M Nursing)--Montana State University--Bozeman, 2009. / Typescript. Chairperson, Graduate Committee: Elizabeth S. Kinion. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 40-43).
19

Effects of milk and forage intake on calf performance

Boggs, Donald L January 2011 (has links)
Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
20

Factors affecting performance of pigs weaned at three weeks of age

Clarkson, Jerry R January 2011 (has links)
Typescript (photocopy). / Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries

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