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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Planet Finance: The Governance of Climate Change Risks in Financial Markets

Thistlethwaite, Jason January 2011 (has links)
This thesis asked two research questions: 1) how are the Climate Disclosure Standards Board (CDSB) and ClimateWise designed to achieve their objectives and 2) what explains the emergence of these unique initiatives? In answer to the first question, the thesis argues that the CDSB and ClimateWise adopt an “unconventional” approach to environmental co-regulation that embraces what I call “cognitive governance” within accounting (CDSB) and insurance (ClimateWise) markets. Many scholars describe environmental co-regulation as a voluntary agreement between transnational corporations (TNCs) and environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGOs) to enforce best practice standards that improve corporate environmental performance without the use of state authority. Cognitive governance employs a more unconventional approach to co-regulation by trying to embed financial knowledge that links a firm’s environmental performance to financial risks throughout the global economy vis-à-vis an expansion of state authority. More specifically, the CDSB and ClimateWise use best practice standards to leverage accounting and insurance knowledge in generating a technical and political consensus that supports expanding public regulation to govern financial risks related to climate change. In answer the second question, the thesis argues that this unconventional co-regulatory strategy adopted by the CDSB and ClimateWise emerged in response to three factors. First, financial firms (in addition to corporate emitters in the case of the CDSB) had material interests in using public regulation to govern climate change risks. Second, these actors realized that collaboration was needed to generate a technical and political consensus among constituencies willing to support public regulation governing climate change risks. Third, ENGOs existed that had interests in using their technical expertise and political capacity to help generate this needed consensus through co-regulation. The thesis makes three contributions to the advancement of scholarly knowledge in the fields of international political economy (IPE) and global environmental politics (GEP). First, IPE and GEP scholars have have largely overlooked the emergence of environmental co-regulation in financial markets, and in particular, have yet to analyze the CDSB and ClimateWise. This study addresses this gap by revealing an effort to mobilize the accounting and insurance industry in strengthening global climate governance. Second, scholars have also tended to view co-regulation through a “post-Westphalian” lens that sees co-regulation as designed to pre-empt or generate an alternative to public regulation. The CDSB and ClimateWise’s strategy, and the factors that explain the creation of these initiatives, challenge this perspective. Third, analysis of this strategy also contributes to emerging scholarship on the influence of “cognition” in shaping market actors’ behavior in conditions of uncertainty.
2

Planet Finance: The Governance of Climate Change Risks in Financial Markets

Thistlethwaite, Jason January 2011 (has links)
This thesis asked two research questions: 1) how are the Climate Disclosure Standards Board (CDSB) and ClimateWise designed to achieve their objectives and 2) what explains the emergence of these unique initiatives? In answer to the first question, the thesis argues that the CDSB and ClimateWise adopt an “unconventional” approach to environmental co-regulation that embraces what I call “cognitive governance” within accounting (CDSB) and insurance (ClimateWise) markets. Many scholars describe environmental co-regulation as a voluntary agreement between transnational corporations (TNCs) and environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGOs) to enforce best practice standards that improve corporate environmental performance without the use of state authority. Cognitive governance employs a more unconventional approach to co-regulation by trying to embed financial knowledge that links a firm’s environmental performance to financial risks throughout the global economy vis-à-vis an expansion of state authority. More specifically, the CDSB and ClimateWise use best practice standards to leverage accounting and insurance knowledge in generating a technical and political consensus that supports expanding public regulation to govern financial risks related to climate change. In answer the second question, the thesis argues that this unconventional co-regulatory strategy adopted by the CDSB and ClimateWise emerged in response to three factors. First, financial firms (in addition to corporate emitters in the case of the CDSB) had material interests in using public regulation to govern climate change risks. Second, these actors realized that collaboration was needed to generate a technical and political consensus among constituencies willing to support public regulation governing climate change risks. Third, ENGOs existed that had interests in using their technical expertise and political capacity to help generate this needed consensus through co-regulation. The thesis makes three contributions to the advancement of scholarly knowledge in the fields of international political economy (IPE) and global environmental politics (GEP). First, IPE and GEP scholars have have largely overlooked the emergence of environmental co-regulation in financial markets, and in particular, have yet to analyze the CDSB and ClimateWise. This study addresses this gap by revealing an effort to mobilize the accounting and insurance industry in strengthening global climate governance. Second, scholars have also tended to view co-regulation through a “post-Westphalian” lens that sees co-regulation as designed to pre-empt or generate an alternative to public regulation. The CDSB and ClimateWise’s strategy, and the factors that explain the creation of these initiatives, challenge this perspective. Third, analysis of this strategy also contributes to emerging scholarship on the influence of “cognition” in shaping market actors’ behavior in conditions of uncertainty.
3

Globalisierung und Entwicklung : die Notwendigkeit einer global governance /

Kahl, Steffi. January 2005 (has links)
Zugl.: Nizza, Universiẗat, Masterarbeit, 2004.
4

Transnationale Steuer- und Fiskalpolitik Regelungsprobleme, Strukturen und Entscheidungsprozesse

König, Markus January 2008 (has links)
Zugl.: München, Techn. Univ., Diss., 2008
5

Wer regiert die Welt? / Who rules the world?

Petritsch, Wolfgang January 2010 (has links)
Das Ende des Nachkriegssystems der multilateralen Finanzorganisationen ist keines im eigentlichen Sinn des Wortes. Aber die Veränderungen im internationalen System sind evident und beschränken sich nicht auf Weltbank und Währungsfonds. Die entscheidende Verschiebung des globalen Machtgefüges findet außerhalb des multilateralen Systems der UNO statt. Es sind informelle Gruppen, die Gs in verschiedener Stärke: G-7/8 als westliches Auslaufmodell, der Newcomer G-20 und wenn Europa nicht aufpasst die G-2: Chinamerica.
6

Emissionshandel im Zeitalter der Global Governance Klimapolitik zwischen Handlungsdruck und Umsetzungsproblemen

Lafeld, Sascha January 2004 (has links)
Zugl.: Münster (Westfalen), Univ., Diss., 2004 u.d.T.: Lafeld, Sascha: Emissionshandel in Deutschland im Zeitalter der Global Governance
7

Zielerreichung internationaler Verträge das Konzept Weltvertrag

Frey, Armin January 2007 (has links)
Zugl.: Duisburg, Essen, Univ., Diss., 2007
8

Integrating Pandemic through Preparedness: Global Security and the Utility of Threat

Sanford, Sarah 20 March 2013 (has links)
Emerging infectious disease has become a paradigmatic way of thinking about disease in recent years. In response to the widely-held view that an emerging pandemic is an imminent, albeit uncertain, event linked to global interconnectedness, pandemic preparedness has been the target of considerable political concern and economic investment. To date, there has been relatively little critical research questioning the broader social and political implications of this seemingly natural undertaking. My research addresses this knowledge gap by exploring pandemic influenza planning as a global approach to the regulation of emerging infectious disease. I investigate how pandemic is framed and the ways in which these framings link to broader political and economic contexts. I undertake a Foucauldian-informed, critical discourse analysis of four key pandemic planning documents produced by the World Health Organization between 1999 and 2009. I ask how infectious disease is constructed in particular ways, and how these constructions can be interpreted in relation to broader global contexts. My findings, which describe a range of discursive strategies in governing pandemic, are four-fold. First, I examine the characterizations of the influenza virus, and their effect of rendering normal and pandemic circumstances as indistinct. I describe how these constructions are implicated in the framing of preparedness as a continuous engagement with the process of emergence. Next, I explore how the delineation and regulation of boundaries simultaneously constitutes bodies and territories as distinct. Third, I describe the discursive construction of a particular kind of global geopolitics which represents vulnerability according to the interconnectedness of states. Finally, the pandemic virus acquires a form of utility that portrays preparedness as having the potential for securing society against a broad range of potential threats. Anticipating the exceptional features of pandemic is to be achieved through the integration of contingency mechanisms into existing systems of preparedness whose objective is continued economic and social functioning. The regulation of circulation central to pandemic preparedness establishes an ongoing engagement in decisions about freedom and constraint in relation to different forms of mobility or circulation. My findings are interpreted in light of their implications for understanding the global regulation of, and intervention into, molecular life.
9

The Rise and Demise of the Free Trade Area of the Americas: A Case Study in Counter-Hegemony

NELSON, MARCEL 24 January 2012 (has links)
This dissertation examines the failure to achieve a final agreement for the Free Trade Area of the Americas(FTAA)at the 2005 Mar del Plata Summit of the Americas. The predominant explanation for this outcome highlights the economic asymmetries and the lack of economic interdependence between the participating states. In view of these structural impediments, based on original field interviews and extensive document analysis, the author goes a step further and argues that these factors were exacerbated by an ideological shift that took place during the decade that the FTAA was negotiated. Specifically, it is argued that the emerging consensus in the hemisphere that was in place at the launching of the FTAA negotiations in 1994 centered on the desirability of economic liberalization; this began to unravel in view of growing political challenges to neo-liberalism in many of the Americas’ social formations. This particular political challenge of economic liberalization emerged against the background of the failure of neo-liberal reforms to achieve their promised results, and the resultant socio-economic polarization. In many social formations, this polarization led to crises of authority, which sometimes opened the political arena to social forces that articulated, to different degrees, alternatives to neo-liberalism. In two countries of import for the FTAA, Venezuela and Brazil, governments were elected which challenged the United States’ leadership within the FTAA negotiations, based on a discourse of state sovereignty. In broader terms, the growing de-legitimization of neo-liberalism in the Americas engendered crises of authority in certain countries, notably in Venezuela and Brazil. This in turn brought forth political dynamics that constrained the United States’ hegemony in the hemisphere, which would have been consolidated by the FTAA. As such, this dissertation draws upon a Gramscian analysis to examine the manner in which crises of authority, rooted in the social formations of the hemisphere, came to be manifested within the institutional framework of the FTAA. Consequently, this work further demonstrates that global governance structures are not only mechanisms through which hegemony is disseminated and counter-hegemony is absorbed, but that they can serve as spaces where hegemony can be confronted and counter-hegemony articulated. / Thesis (Ph.D, Political Studies) -- Queen's University, 2012-01-24 10:01:37.746
10

Mindmade Politics - The Role of Cognition in Global Climate Change Governance

Milkoreit, Manjana January 2013 (has links)
This dissertation explores the role of cognition—the elements, structures and processes of individual and collective thought—in finding effective, cooperative solutions to climate change. It makes three contributions—theoretical, empirical, and methodological—to international relations scholarship. First, it explores cognition as a significant variable in international political life, developing an analytical framework that not only links a cognitive framework of analysis to major IR theories but bridges current theoretical divides between rationalism and constructivism. Second, by identifying and visualizing current belief systems of participants in global climate negotiations, the thesis offers insights regarding cognitive obstacles to multilateral cooperation. The most important obstacle is a clash of substantively and emotionally different belief systems. Depending on the specific constellation of a person’s beliefs about collective identity, perceptions of climate-change threat, and associated emotions, some belief systems contain normative beliefs about justice (i.e., a dominant logic of appropriateness), while others do not. The latter belief systems reflect the national-interest logic of consequences. Focusing in particular on the “wicked” characteristics of climate change, the analysis further reveals a neglect of scientific knowledge (in particular knowledge of the possibility of climate tipping points), a serious under-valuation of the distant future, and perceptions of a number of constraints on agency, some of which cannot be resolved within the negotiations. The study also identifies six distinct belief systems among climate negotiators, which I label The International Community, A Minilateral Club, The Market, Individuals, The Developed World, and The Irresponsible West. The key element distinguishing these belief systems is actor type, which affects problem definitions, proposed solutions, political strategies, and more generally an actor’s role in global climate governance. Third, this dissertation expands the methodological toolbox available to IR scholars by demonstrating the value and synergistic power of cognitive-affective mapping and Q Method. These are powerful tools to reveal individual and collective belief systems respectively.

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