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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Crop Growth and Development for Irrigated Chile (Capiscum annuum)

Silvertooth, J.C., Brown, Paul, Walker, Stephanie 09 1900 (has links)
2 pp.
2

Effect of an upper temperature threshold on heat unit calculations, defoliation timing, lint yield, and fiber quality in cotton

Fromme, Daniel D. 15 May 2009 (has links)
Crop managers need to determine the most profitable time to defoliate cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in a high rainfall environment such as the coastal region of Texas. In cotton production, delaying defoliation exposes open bolls to a higher probability of rainfall, and thus, reduces lint yield and fiber quality. Premature defoliation, however, has detrimental affects on lint yield and fiber quality. A more recent method to determine defoliation is based on heat-unit (HU or DD15) accumulation after physiological cutout or five nodes above white flower (NAWF=5). Results have been inconsistent across a wide range of field environments when utilizing HU accumulation past cutout; therefore, adoption of this method has been limited. Many regions of the Cotton Belt have maximum day time temperatures during the growing season that are above optimum for maximum growth. Field studies were conducted for three consecutive growing seasons in the Brazos River Valley and Upper Gulf Coast regions of Texas. The purpose of this research was to identify an upper temperature threshold (UTT) for calculating degree days for defoliation timing. The experimental design consisted of a split-plot design with four replications. The main plots consisted of three upper temperature thresholds (32°C, 35°C, and no upper limit) and the subplots were five HU timings (361, 417, 472, 528, and 583) accumulated from date of cutout. Utilizing an UTT to calculate daily HU failed to explain differences in the optimum time to defoliate based on accumulated HU from cutout for the upper thresholds investigated. Accumulated HU had a significant impact, however, on defoliation timing. Comparison of the two locations showed that maximum lint yield was obtained at 472 HU and 52% open boll at Wharton County versus a maximum of 528 HU and 62% open boll for the Burleson County location. Employing the NACB=4 method to time defoliation at both locations would have resulted in premature application of harvest aids and reduced lint yields. No differences were observed in adjusted gross income values at Wharton County among the 417, 472, 528, and 583 HU treatments. For Burleson County, adjusted gross income peaked in value at 528 HU.
3

Využití termoelektrického generátoru pro zvýšení účinnosti otopného tělesa / Using thermoelectric generator to increase the efficiency of the radiator

Kříž, Pavel January 2015 (has links)
This diploma thesis deals with a design layout of the fan power supply that ensures the increase of the efficiency of the heating unit. For usage in the areas without electric power, the power supply is secured by thermoelectric generator. The system has to function on the basis of autonomous system which turns itself on only when necessary. In the introductory part of the paper there is a recherché of thermoelectric generators for general usage. Next it mentions the basic findings in from the field of DC/DC converters for low power applications. In this part attention is given to MPPT algorithm. Furthermore basic knowledge from the field of heat transmission together with its most used elements is described. Subsequently existing applications that increase the effectiveness of heating are mentioned. Their disadvantage however is that they depend on the external source of power supply. The practical part to a large extent covers the analysis of the suitability of the chosen thermoelectric module. For securing of the heat gradient of the generator there was a model created meeting the figures in the manual and there are several simulations in the MATLAB program. Furthermore several measurements of the thermoelectric module took place in order to secure realistic figures. Subsequently a DC/DC converter was chosen. Finally the testing was made on the real composition. In conclusion there is an overall evaluation including the real usage and the economical aspect of the project. The outcomes of the work enable to avoid common mistakes that are part of many specialized articles. The created system is to be used after the adjustment of the cooling to the required aim. At the same time it becomes very effective.
4

Factors governing zoysiagrass response to herbicides applied during spring green-up

Craft, Jordan Michael 29 March 2021 (has links)
Zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp.) is utilized as a warm-season turfgrass because of its density, visual quality, stress tolerance, and reduced input requirements. Turf managers often exploit winter dormancy in warm-season turfgrass to apply nonselective herbicides such as glyphosate and glufosinate to control winter annual weeds. Although this weed control strategy is common in bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.), it has been less adopted in zoysiagrass due to unexplainable turf injury. Many university extension publications recommend against applying nonselective herbicides to dormant zoysiagrass despite promotional language found in a few peer-reviewed publications and product labels. Previous researchers have used vague terminology such as "applied to dormant zoysiagrass" or "applied prior to zoysiagrass green-up" to describe herbicide application timings. These ambiguous terms have led to confusion since zoysiagrass typically has subcanopy green leaves and stems throughout the winter dormancy period. No research has sought to explain why some turfgrass managers are observing zoysiagrass injury when the literature only offers evidence that these herbicides do not injure dormant zoysiagrass. We sought to explore various herbicides, prevailing temperatures surrounding application, heat unit based application timings, and spray penetration into zoysiagrass canopies as possible contributors to zoysiagrass injury. The results indicated that a wide range of herbicides may be safely used in dormant zoysiagrass. However, as zoysiagrass begins to produce more green leaves, herbicides such as metsulfuron, glyphosate, glufosinate, flumioxazin, and diquat become too injurious. Glufosinate was consistently more injurious regardless of application timing than glyphosate and other herbicides. When temperatures were 10 °C for 7 d following treatment, a delayed effect of glyphosate and glufosinate effect on digitally-assessed green cover loss was noted on zoysiagrass sprigs. In subsequent studies on turf plugs, a 14-d incubation period at 10 °C reduced glyphosate but not glufosinate effects on turf green color reduction. Glyphosate applied at 125, and 200 GDD5C can safely be applied to zoysiagrass while glufosinate applied at the same timings caused inconsistent and often unacceptable zoysiagrass injury in field studies conducted at Blacksburg, VA, Starkville, MS, and Virginia Beach, VA. Zoysiagrass green leaf density was described as a function of accumulated heat units consistently across years and locations but variably by turf mowing height. Turf normalized difference vegetative index was primarily governed by green turf cover but reduced by herbicide treatments, especially when applied at greater than 200 GDD5C. Substantial spray deposition occurred to subcanopy tissue regardless of nozzle type, pressure and height above the zoysiagrass canopy based on spectrophotometric assessment of a colorant admixture. However, increasing nozzle height above the turf canopy and avoiding air induction type nozzles significantly reduced the percentage of green tissue exposed at lower canopy levels. Absorption of radio-labeled glyphosate and glufosinate was up to four times greater when exposed to zoysiagrass stems compared to leaves. Glyphosate translocated more than glufosinate and both herbicides moved more readily from stem to leaf than from leaf to stem / Doctor of Philosophy / Zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp.) is utilized as a warm-season turfgrass because of its density, visual quality, stress tolerance, and reduced input requirements. Being that zoysiagrass is a warm-season turfgrass, it enters a dormancy period during the winter months. During this period, zoysiagrasses' active growth is halted, and leaves lose their green color and turn a golden-brown color. The winter dormancy period presents turfgrass managers with a unique opportunity to apply nonselective herbicides such as glyphosate and glufosinate to control a broad spectrum of winter annual weeds. Although this weed control strategy is common in bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.), it has been less adopted in zoysiagrass due to turfgrass managers observing unexplainable turfgrass injury. Many university extension publications recommend against applying nonselective herbicides to dormant zoysiagrass despite language found in peer-reviewed publications and product labels suggesting they could be safely applied. Previous researchers have used vague terminology such as "applied to dormant zoysiagrass" or "applied prior to zoysiagrass green-up" to describe herbicide application timings. These terms have led to confusion about when to make these applications since zoysiagrass typically has subcanopy green leaves and stems throughout the winter dormancy period. No research has sought to explain why some turfgrass managers observe zoysiagrass injury when the literature only offers evidence that these herbicides do not injure dormant zoysiagrass. Research projects were designed to explore various herbicides, temperatures surrounding herbicide applications, application timings, and spray penetration into zoysiagrass canopies as possible contributors to zoysiagrass injury. The results indicated that a wide range of herbicides may be safely used in dormant and semidormant zoysiagrass. However, as zoysiagrass begins to produce more green leaves and stems, herbicides such as metsulfuron, glyphosate, glufosinate, flumioxazin, and diquat become too injurious and should be avoided. Across multiple research studies, glufosinate was consistently more injurious regardless of application timing than glyphosate and other herbicides. When temperatures were 10 °C for 7-d following treatment, it delayed zoysaigrass response to glyphosate and glufosinate. In a subsequent study, when temperatures were at 10 °C for a 14-d period, glyphosate and the nontreated reached 50% green cover at the same time, which suggests cold temperatures could mitigate glyphosate injury on zoysiagrass over a 14-d period. The 10 ° temperature only delayed glufosinate injury on zoysiagrass, and no safening was observed. The results also indicated that as temperatures increased, glyphosate and glufosinate rate in which injury was observed increased on the zoysiagrass. Glyphosate applied at 125, and 200 GDD5C can safely be applied to zoysiagrass while glufosinate applied at the same timings caused inconsistent and often unacceptable zoysiagrass injury in field studies conducted at Blacksburg, VA, Starkville, MS, and Virginia Beach, VA. Zoysiagrass injury increased when glyphosate and glufosinate were applied later into the spring when more green leaves were present regardless of location. Accumulated heat units and zoysiagrass green leaf density were closely related, indicating that accumulated heat units could be a useful tool for turfgrass managers to track zoysiagrass spring green-up. Substantial spray deposition was found on subcanopy zoysiagrass leaves and stems regardless of nozzle type, pressure, and height above the zoysiagrass canopy based on recovered colorant at the upper, middle and lower levels of the zoysiagrass canopy. However, avoiding air induction-type nozzles and raising spray height may slightly decrease penetration of spray droplets into a zoysiagrass subcanopy, but a large percentage of droplets still reached the middle and lower canopy layers in this research. Absorption of radio-labeled glyphosate and glufosinate was up to four times greater when applied directly to zoysiagrass stolen compared to leaves. Glyphosate translocated more than glufosinate, and both herbicides moved more readily from stem to leaf than from leaf to stem. These data suggest limiting the number of green zoysiagrass leaves at application would be an effective method to avoid injury zoysiagrass when applying nonselective herbicides

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