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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Cultural formulations for homelessness

Harris, Jacob January 2001 (has links)
Boston University. University Professors Program Senior theses. / PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you. / 2031-01-02
2

The spatial origins of the homeless how the homeless vary in their geographic distribution /

Rukmana, Deden. Connerly, Charles. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Florida State University, 2006. / Advisor: Charles E. Connerly, Florida State University, College of Social Science, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning. Includes bibliographical references.
3

American refugees an ethnographic study of the street homeless /

Wasserman, Jason Adam. January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Alabama at Birmingham, 2007. / Title from PDF title page (viewed Sept. 23, 2009). Additional advisors: Kenneth L. Wilson, Jeffrey Hall, Christopher Taylor, Max Michael. Includes bibliographical references (p. 275-284).
4

PSYCHACHE AND SELF-HARMING BEHAVIOUR AMONG MEN WHO ARE HOMELESS: A TEST OF SHNEIDMAN'S MODEL

PATTERSON, ALLISHA 06 August 2010 (has links)
Suicidal ideation among the homeless is 10 times greater than in the general population. Therefore, research helping mental health professionals better predict and potentially prevent suicide within the homeless population is an important societal focus. Various cognitive theories of depression and hopelessness have been proposed to explain suicidality, however, to date, none of these are able to fully explain the phenomenon. More recently, Shneidman has suggested a theory of psychache (i.e., unbearable psychological pain) to explain suicidality. Although this theory has been supported by investigations with university students, there has not been much research exploring psychache with populations at high risk for suicide. The current study attempts to assess Shneidman’s theory with a high risk population, namely the homeless. Ninety-seven men were recruited at homeless shelters and drop-in centres. Participants completed questionnaires assessing criterion measures of suicidality and psychological predictors of depression, hopelessness, life meaning, and psychache. Analyses revealed that psychache was the only variable with statistical predictive ability over and above the other three psychological variables in predicting suicide ideation, motivation, preparation, and attempt history. This finding indicates that psychache is a better predictor of suicidality than depression, hopelessness, and life meaning and supports Shneidman’s model of psychache as the most proximal cause of suicide. Results also indicate the potential use of a scale assessing psychache in mental health settings to predict those who are, and are not, at risk for suicide. / Thesis (Master, Psychology) -- Queen's University, 2010-08-05 17:49:11.178
5

Politics of homelessness hidden motivations for the criminalization of homelessness /

Hetzler, Olivia. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2006. / The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 30, 2007) Includes bibliographical references.
6

WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR ADDICTIONS, BUT WE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR RECOVERY": A QUALITATIVE EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE LI

Rayburn, Rachel 05 September 2008 (has links)
This is an exploratory, qualitative study of homeless, recovering alcoholics and the problems they encounter maintaining sobriety. Using semi-structured interviews, I analyze the experiences of ten men in their forties, who are in a recovery program designed for homeless men. I ask them how they stay sober without a place to live. Three kinds of problems are inferred from their narrative histories. First, the men have difficulty identifying as alcoholics. They have trouble fully integrating into the AA program. Second, the men struggle to form relationships with others, especially with a sponsor. Third, the process of "working the steps" is adapted complexly, more than in a normal twelve-step setting. The findings indicate that homeless men face special barriers to achieving and maintaining sobriety. I conclude by discussing the larger implications for sobriety, homelessness and social change within this community. / M.A. / Department of Sociology / Sciences / Applied Sociology MA
7

Tobacco roads: an exploration of the meaning and situatedness of smoking among homeless adult males in Winnipeg

Bobowski, Michelle 11 March 2013 (has links)
Homeless individuals are some of the most marginalized Canadians and most likely to use tobacco daily. The transient nature of homeless smokers contributes to marginalization within health care as well as tobacco control strategies. The purpose of this study was to describe acquisition and smoking behaviors of homeless individuals as a first step in developing essential research evidence to inform tobacco control strategies relevant to this vulnerable population. This ethnographic study investigated the everyday reality of 15 male homeless individuals living in the Salvation Army Shelter in Winnipeg. Tobacco use was explored against their environmental and social contexts, homeless smokers used an informal street-based economy for acquisition, and smoking behaviors were high risk for infectious diseases with sharing and smoking discarded cigarettes. Tobacco control strategies that consider homeless individuals have the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality along with diminishing inequitable health burdens with this population.
8

Shared stories, silent understandings: aboriginal women speak on homelessness

Maes, Christina 09 January 2012 (has links)
Increased knowledge about Aboriginal women’s unique experiences of homelessness will assist in improving and altering service systems. Planning theory suggests planners can consciously work to ensure the stories of marginalized peoples are heard and understood, which can transform systems and institutions. From an Indigenous planning perspective, transformation must involve reflecting on and altering colonial systems. Using survey, focus group, and interview methodologies, various types of stories were told, analysed and retold as common themes and overarching considerations. In this research, stories about trauma and tragedy were told as common and shared experiences. The women participating spoke about a need to be heard and respected and throughout their stories gaps in services were shown to dramatically reduce their ability to change their own circumstances. Recommendations were developed with Aboriginal women experiencing homelessness with the intent of transforming systems to begin a new story of healing and hope.
9

Shared stories, silent understandings: aboriginal women speak on homelessness

Maes, Christina 09 January 2012 (has links)
Increased knowledge about Aboriginal women’s unique experiences of homelessness will assist in improving and altering service systems. Planning theory suggests planners can consciously work to ensure the stories of marginalized peoples are heard and understood, which can transform systems and institutions. From an Indigenous planning perspective, transformation must involve reflecting on and altering colonial systems. Using survey, focus group, and interview methodologies, various types of stories were told, analysed and retold as common themes and overarching considerations. In this research, stories about trauma and tragedy were told as common and shared experiences. The women participating spoke about a need to be heard and respected and throughout their stories gaps in services were shown to dramatically reduce their ability to change their own circumstances. Recommendations were developed with Aboriginal women experiencing homelessness with the intent of transforming systems to begin a new story of healing and hope.
10

Tobacco roads: an exploration of the meaning and situatedness of smoking among homeless adult males in Winnipeg

Bobowski, Michelle 11 March 2013 (has links)
Homeless individuals are some of the most marginalized Canadians and most likely to use tobacco daily. The transient nature of homeless smokers contributes to marginalization within health care as well as tobacco control strategies. The purpose of this study was to describe acquisition and smoking behaviors of homeless individuals as a first step in developing essential research evidence to inform tobacco control strategies relevant to this vulnerable population. This ethnographic study investigated the everyday reality of 15 male homeless individuals living in the Salvation Army Shelter in Winnipeg. Tobacco use was explored against their environmental and social contexts, homeless smokers used an informal street-based economy for acquisition, and smoking behaviors were high risk for infectious diseases with sharing and smoking discarded cigarettes. Tobacco control strategies that consider homeless individuals have the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality along with diminishing inequitable health burdens with this population.

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