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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Théorie de la mémoire

Gratacap, Antoine. January 1866 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Paris. / Includes bibliographical references.
12

The remembrance of problems and of their solutions study in logical memory,

Finkenbinder, Erwin Oliver, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Clark University, 1913. / "Reprinted from the American journal of psychology XXV, 1914." "From the psychological laboratory of Clark university, pp. 32-81."
13

Minnets Funktion, Struktur och Utveckling

Elmgren, John Kristian Gustaf, January 1934 (has links)
Akademisk Avhandling--Göteborgs Högskola. / Extra t.p., with thesis note, inserted. "Litteraturförteckning": p. [261]-264.
14

The memory image and its qualitative fidelity

Bentley, Madison, January 1899 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Cornell University.
15

Recognition memory and BCDMEM : an ERP based investigation of the link between the N400 and strength and the LPC and decision confidence /

Turner, Kelley. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (B. Sc.(Hons.))--University of Queensland, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references.
16

Accounting for age effects on direct and indirect memory : single versus multi-factor theories /

White, Jill. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Queensland, 2002. / Includes bibliographical references.
17

Visual confusions in immediate memory.

Hiles, David Roger. January 1971 (has links)
No description available.
18

The assessment of very long-term memory using the questionnaire technique : a replication and extension

Czerwinski, Mary P. January 1983 (has links)
A replication and extension of a questionnaire technique for assessing very long-term memory is described. A 90-item questionnaire containing items from five different categories was administered to an Introductory Psychology class consisting of 90 females and 57 males. Results from each of the five categories revealed deviations from a linear trend in the recognition scores of items for a given year. Also, the results indicated that large proportions of the variance were due to the stimulus items used for that particular category. A post hoc test was included for two of the categories which tested the relationship between the number of references an item received in the New York Times Index with its recognition score on the questionnaire. A significant relationship was found and this evidence was used to support the hypothesis that the more available an item is to the general public, the more recognizable or distinctive it becomes. This distinctiveness causes the item to be resistant to memory decay and more recognizable, regardless of age.
19

Brain Regions Involved in Long-term Spatial Memory: fMRI and Behavioural Studies

Hirshhorn, Marnie 24 July 2013 (has links)
In this thesis, I investigated the role of the hippocampus and other brain regions in long-term spatial memory. I used neuroimaging and behavioural techniques to compare spatial representations that are dependent on the hippocampus and those that rely on extra-hippocampal structures. In Experiment 1, I demonstrated that at least some spatial memories that are initially dependent on the hippocampus can become independent of it with time. This was done by looking at changes in brain activation as participants became familiar with a real-world environment over a year. Hippocampal activation was found during mental navigation tasks when participants were new to Toronto, but not after they had lived there for a year. This change was accompanied by an increase in activation in the posterior parahippocampal gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus, and superior temporal gyrus. In Experiment 2, I used neuroimaging to compare hippocampal involvement during the retrieval of coarse- and fine-grained spatial details, and episodic details associated with a familiar environment. I showed that hippocampally-mediated representations contain more fine-grained spatial details than extra-hippocampal spatial representations. Further, I demonstrated that fine-grained details become less dependent on the hippocampus with experience, but episodic details require the hippocampus throughout the lifetime of the memory. In Experiment 3, I provided behavioural evidence that the role of hippocampus in episodic memory associated with a familiar environment is crucially related to the degree of detail retrieved. Older adults were asked to recall walking routes from their daily lives and the number of details retrieved was correlated with tests sensitive to hippocampal function. Finally, I showed that the extra-hippocampal regions implicated in spatial memory depend on task demands. Basic navigation can be supported by the posterior parahippocampal gyrus, lingual gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, caudate and inferior frontal gyrus, independently of the hippocampus. When navigation requires fine-grained spatial details, additional regions including the precuneus and supramarginal gyrus will be recruited. When the task requires the retrieval of episodic details, the posterior cingulate, angular gyrus, and medial frontal lobes will be required, along with the hippocampus.
20

Brain Regions Involved in Long-term Spatial Memory: fMRI and Behavioural Studies

Hirshhorn, Marnie 24 July 2013 (has links)
In this thesis, I investigated the role of the hippocampus and other brain regions in long-term spatial memory. I used neuroimaging and behavioural techniques to compare spatial representations that are dependent on the hippocampus and those that rely on extra-hippocampal structures. In Experiment 1, I demonstrated that at least some spatial memories that are initially dependent on the hippocampus can become independent of it with time. This was done by looking at changes in brain activation as participants became familiar with a real-world environment over a year. Hippocampal activation was found during mental navigation tasks when participants were new to Toronto, but not after they had lived there for a year. This change was accompanied by an increase in activation in the posterior parahippocampal gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus, and superior temporal gyrus. In Experiment 2, I used neuroimaging to compare hippocampal involvement during the retrieval of coarse- and fine-grained spatial details, and episodic details associated with a familiar environment. I showed that hippocampally-mediated representations contain more fine-grained spatial details than extra-hippocampal spatial representations. Further, I demonstrated that fine-grained details become less dependent on the hippocampus with experience, but episodic details require the hippocampus throughout the lifetime of the memory. In Experiment 3, I provided behavioural evidence that the role of hippocampus in episodic memory associated with a familiar environment is crucially related to the degree of detail retrieved. Older adults were asked to recall walking routes from their daily lives and the number of details retrieved was correlated with tests sensitive to hippocampal function. Finally, I showed that the extra-hippocampal regions implicated in spatial memory depend on task demands. Basic navigation can be supported by the posterior parahippocampal gyrus, lingual gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, caudate and inferior frontal gyrus, independently of the hippocampus. When navigation requires fine-grained spatial details, additional regions including the precuneus and supramarginal gyrus will be recruited. When the task requires the retrieval of episodic details, the posterior cingulate, angular gyrus, and medial frontal lobes will be required, along with the hippocampus.

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