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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Development of a radiative transport based, fluorescence-enhanced, frequency-domain small animal imaging system

Rasmussen, John C. 15 May 2009 (has links)
Herein we present the development of a fluorescence-enhanced, frequency-domain radiative transport reconstruction system designed for small animal optical tomography. The system includes a time-dependent data acquisition instrument, a radiative transport based forward model for prediction of time-dependent propagation of photons in small, non-diffuse volumes, and an algorithm which utilizes the forward model to reconstruct fluorescent yields from air/tissue boundary measurements. The major components of the instrumentation include a charge coupled device camera, an image intensifier, signal generators, and an optical switch. Time-dependent data were obtained in the frequency-domain using homodyne techniques on phantoms with 0.2% to 3% intralipid solutions. Through collaboration with Transpire, Inc., a fluorescence-enhanced, frequency-domain, radiative transport equation (RTE) solver was developed. This solver incorporates the discrete ordinates, source iteration with diffusion synthetic acceleration, and linear discontinuous finite element differencing schemes, to predict accurately the fluence of excitation and emission photons in diffuse and transport limited systems. Additional techniques such as the first scattered distributed source method and integral transport theory are used to model the numerical apertures of fiber optic sources and detectors. The accuracy of the RTE solver was validated against diffusion and Monte Carlo predictions and experimental data. The comparisons were favorable in both the diffusion and transport limits, with average errors of the RTE predictions, as compared to experimental data, typically being less than 8% in amplitude and 7% in phase. These average errors are similar to those of the Monte Carlo and diffusion predictions. Synthetic data from a virtual mouse were used to demonstrate the feasibility of using the RTE solver for reconstructing fluorescent heterogeneities in small, non-diffuse volumes. The current version of the RTE solver limits the reconstruction to one iteration and the reconstruction of marginally diffuse, frequency-domain experimental data using RTE was not successful. Multiple iterations using a diffusion solver successfully reconstructed the fluorescent heterogeneities, indicating that, when available, multiple iterations of the RTE based solver should also reconstruct the heterogeneities.
2

Development of a radiative transport based, fluorescence-enhanced, frequency-domain small animal imaging system

Rasmussen, John C. 15 May 2009 (has links)
Herein we present the development of a fluorescence-enhanced, frequency-domain radiative transport reconstruction system designed for small animal optical tomography. The system includes a time-dependent data acquisition instrument, a radiative transport based forward model for prediction of time-dependent propagation of photons in small, non-diffuse volumes, and an algorithm which utilizes the forward model to reconstruct fluorescent yields from air/tissue boundary measurements. The major components of the instrumentation include a charge coupled device camera, an image intensifier, signal generators, and an optical switch. Time-dependent data were obtained in the frequency-domain using homodyne techniques on phantoms with 0.2% to 3% intralipid solutions. Through collaboration with Transpire, Inc., a fluorescence-enhanced, frequency-domain, radiative transport equation (RTE) solver was developed. This solver incorporates the discrete ordinates, source iteration with diffusion synthetic acceleration, and linear discontinuous finite element differencing schemes, to predict accurately the fluence of excitation and emission photons in diffuse and transport limited systems. Additional techniques such as the first scattered distributed source method and integral transport theory are used to model the numerical apertures of fiber optic sources and detectors. The accuracy of the RTE solver was validated against diffusion and Monte Carlo predictions and experimental data. The comparisons were favorable in both the diffusion and transport limits, with average errors of the RTE predictions, as compared to experimental data, typically being less than 8% in amplitude and 7% in phase. These average errors are similar to those of the Monte Carlo and diffusion predictions. Synthetic data from a virtual mouse were used to demonstrate the feasibility of using the RTE solver for reconstructing fluorescent heterogeneities in small, non-diffuse volumes. The current version of the RTE solver limits the reconstruction to one iteration and the reconstruction of marginally diffuse, frequency-domain experimental data using RTE was not successful. Multiple iterations using a diffusion solver successfully reconstructed the fluorescent heterogeneities, indicating that, when available, multiple iterations of the RTE based solver should also reconstruct the heterogeneities.
3

Imagerie sélective des tissus biologiques : apport de la polarisation pour une sélection en profondeur

Rehn, Simon 21 December 2012 (has links)
Les techniques d'imagerie optique, dans la gamme de longueurs d'onde visible et proche infrarouge, permettent d'examiner très facilement les tissus biologiques de manière non invasive. Toutefois la forte diffusion des tissus biologiques limite fortement leur examen en profondeur. Examinés en rétrodiffusion (examen de la peau ou du col de l'uterus par exemple), non seulement les mesures sont polluées par la réflexion spéculaire, mais l'information sur la source volumique du signal est également perdue du fait de la forte diffusion. La prise en compte de la diffusion dans le modèle de propagation de la lumière permet d'évaluer cette distribution volumique du signal lumineux en fonction des propriétés optiques du milieu. Pour sophistiquer l'approche, nous introduisons un filtrage polarimétrique, basé sur l'utilisation de la lumière polarisée elliptiquement, particulièrement approprié à la géométrie de rétrodiffusion, permettant avant tout un sondage sélectif en profondeur tout en s'affranchissant de la réflexion spéculaire. Cette technique permet ainsi d'examiner les tissus à l'échelle mésoscopique (jusqu'à l'échelle du millimètre). / Optical imaging techniques using the visible and near-infrared wavelengths allow an easy and non-invasive way of analysing biological tissues. However, the high scattering of biological tissues significantly limits the depth of examination. Backscattering examination (of skin or of the cervix for example) shows not only that the measurements are polluted by mirror reflection, but also that information about the source of the signal is lost as a result of the high scattering. Including scattering in the light propagation model allows the evaluation of the volume distribution of the light signal as a function of the optical properties of the medium. In order to make the approach more sophisticated, we introduced a polarimetric filtering that uses elliptically polarised light. This is not only particularly appropriate for backscattering geometry, but also allows firstly to probe at selected depths and secondly to eliminate mirror reflection. Thus, this technique allows the examination of tissues at a mesoscopic scale (up to the milimeter scale).

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