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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Bayesian phylogenetic approaches to retroviral evolution : recombination, cross-species transmission, and immune escape

Kist, Nicolaas Christiaan January 2017 (has links)
No description available.
2

Studies of the early immunological and virological events following Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 infection in the rabbit model

Haynes, Rashade Ameir Hakim, II 26 August 2009 (has links)
No description available.
3

Mathematical modelling of HTLV-I infection: a study of viral persistence in vivo

Lim, Aaron Guanliang Unknown Date
No description available.
4

Mathematical modelling of HTLV-I infection: a study of viral persistence in vivo

Lim, Aaron Guanliang 11 1900 (has links)
Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a persistent human retrovirus characterized by life-long infection and risk of developing HAM/TSP, a progressive neurological and inflammatory disease. Despite extensive studies of HTLV-I, a complete understanding of the viral dynamics has been elusive. Previous mathematical models are unable to fully explain experimental observations. Motivated by a new hypothesis for the mechanism of HTLV-I infection, a three dimensional compartmental model of ordinary differential equations is constructed that focusses on the highly dynamic interactions among populations of healthy, latently infected, and actively infected target cells. Results from mathematical and numerical investigations give rise to relevant biological interpretations. Comparisons of these results with experimental observations allow us to assess the validity of the original hypothesis. Our findings provide valuable insights to the infection and persistence of HTLV-I in vivo and motivate future mathematical and experimental work. / Applied Mathematics

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