• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 8
  • Tagged with
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Providing Support for the Movidius Myriad1 Platform in the SkePU Skeleton Programming Framework

Cuello, Rosandra January 2014 (has links)
The Movidius Myriad1 Platform is a multicore embedded platform primed to offer high performance and power efficiency for computer vision applications in mobile devices. The challenges of programming multicore environments are well known and skeleton programming offers a high-level programming alternative for parallel computing, intended to hide the complexities of the system from the programmer. The SkePU Skeleton Programming Framework includes backend implementations for CPU and GPU systems and it has the capacity to support more platforms by extending its backend implementations. With this master thesis project we aim to extend the SkePU Skeleton Programming Framework to provide support for execution in the Movidius Myriad1 embedded platform. Our SkePU backend for Myriad1 consists on a set of macros and functions to compose the different elements of a Myriad1 application, data communication structures to exchange data between the host systems and Myriad1, and a helper script and auxiliary files to generate a Myriad1 application.Evaluation and testing demonstrate that our backend is usable, however further optimizations are needed to obtain good performance that would make it practical to use in real life applications, particularly when it comes to data communication. As part of this project, we have outlined some improvements that could be applied to obtain better performance overall in the future, addressing the issues found with the methods of data communication.
2

A Skeleton library for Cell Broadband Engine / Ett Skelettbibliotek för Cell Broadband Engine

Ålind, Markus January 2008 (has links)
<p>The Cell Broadband Engine processor is a powerful processor capable of over 220 GFLOPS. It is highly specialized and can be controlled in detail by the programmer. The Cell is significantly more complicated to program than a standard homogeneous multi core processor such as the Intel Core2 Duo and Quad. This thesis explores the possibility to abstract some of the complexities of Cell programming while maintaining high performance. The abstraction is achieved through a library of parallel skeletons implemented in the bulk synchronous parallel programming environment NestStep. The library includes constructs for user defined SIMD optimized data parallel skeletons such as map, reduce and more. The evaluation of the library includes porting of a vector based scientific computation program from sequential C code to the Cell using the library and the NestStep environment. The ported program shows good performance when compared to the sequential original code run on a high-end x86 processor. The evaluation also shows that a dot product implemented with the skeleton library is faster than the dot product in the IBM BLAS library for the Cell processor with more than two slave processors.</p><p> </p>
3

A Skeleton library for Cell Broadband Engine / Ett Skelettbibliotek för Cell Broadband Engine

Ålind, Markus January 2008 (has links)
The Cell Broadband Engine processor is a powerful processor capable of over 220 GFLOPS. It is highly specialized and can be controlled in detail by the programmer. The Cell is significantly more complicated to program than a standard homogeneous multi core processor such as the Intel Core2 Duo and Quad. This thesis explores the possibility to abstract some of the complexities of Cell programming while maintaining high performance. The abstraction is achieved through a library of parallel skeletons implemented in the bulk synchronous parallel programming environment NestStep. The library includes constructs for user defined SIMD optimized data parallel skeletons such as map, reduce and more. The evaluation of the library includes porting of a vector based scientific computation program from sequential C code to the Cell using the library and the NestStep environment. The ported program shows good performance when compared to the sequential original code run on a high-end x86 processor. The evaluation also shows that a dot product implemented with the skeleton library is faster than the dot product in the IBM BLAS library for the Cell processor with more than two slave processors.
4

A Skeleton Programming Library for Multicore CPU and Multi-GPU Systems

Enmyren, Johan January 2010 (has links)
This report presents SkePU, a C++ template library which provides a simple and unified interface for specifying data-parallel computations with the help of skeletons on GPUs using CUDA and OpenCL. The interface is also general enough to support other architectures, and SkePU implements both a sequential CPU and a parallel OpenMP back end. It also supports multi-GPU systems. Benchmarks show that copying data between the host and the GPU is often a bottleneck. Therefore a container which uses lazy memory copying has been implemented to avoid unnecessary memory transfers. SkePU was evaluated with small benchmarks and a larger application, a Runge-Kutta ODE solver. The results show that skeletal parallel programming is indeed a viable approach for GPU Computing and that a generalized interface for multiple back ends is also reasonable. The best performance gains are received when the computation load is large compared to memory I/O (the lazy memory copying can help to achieve this). We see that SkePU offers good performance with a more complex and realistic task such as ODE solving, with up to ten times faster run times when using SkePU with a GPU back end compared to a sequential solver running on a fast CPU. From the benchmarks we can conclude that skeletal parallel programming is indeed a viable approach for GPU Computing and that a generalized interface for multiple back ends is also reasonable. SkePU does however have some disadvantages too; there is some overhead in using the library which we can see from the dot product and LibSolve benchmarks. Although not big, it is still there and if performance is of uttermost importance, then a hand coded solution would be best. One cannot express all calculations in terms of skeletons either, if one have such a problem, specialized routines must still be created.
5

Skeleton Programming for Heterogeneous GPU-based Systems

Dastgeer, Usman January 2011 (has links)
In this thesis, we address issues associated with programming modern heterogeneous systems while focusing on a special kind of heterogeneous systems that include multicore CPUs and one or more GPUs, called GPU-based systems.We consider the skeleton programming approach to achieve high level abstraction for efficient and portable programming of these GPU-based systemsand present our work on SkePU library which is a skeleton library for these systems. We extend the existing SkePU library with a two-dimensional (2D) data type and skeleton operations and implement several new applications using newly made skeletons. Furthermore, we consider the algorithmic choice present in SkePU and implement support to specify and automatically optimize the algorithmic choice for a skeleton call, on a given platform. To show how to achieve performance, we provide a case-study on optimized GPU-based skeleton implementation for 2D stencil computations and introduce two metrics to maximize resource utilization on a GPU. By devising a mechanism to automatically calculate these two metrics, performance can be retained while porting an application from one GPU architecture to another. Another contribution of this thesis is implementation of the runtime support for the SkePU skeleton library. This is achieved with the help of the StarPUruntime system. By this implementation,support for dynamic scheduling and load balancing for the SkePU skeleton programs is achieved. Furthermore, a capability to do hybrid executionby parallel execution on all available CPUs and GPUs in a system, even for a single skeleton invocation, is developed. SkePU initially supported only data-parallel skeletons. The first task-parallel skeleton (farm) in SkePU is implemented with support for performance-aware scheduling and hierarchical parallel execution by enabling all data parallel skeletons to be usable as tasks inside the farm construct. Experimental evaluations are carried out and presented for algorithmic selection, performance portability, dynamic scheduling and hybrid execution aspects of our work.
6

Extension of the SkePU Skeleton ProgrammingFramework for Multi-core CPU and Multi-GPU Systems for MPI-based Clusters

Mangaraj, Swadhin K January 2013 (has links)
SkePU (Skeleton Programming Framework for Multi-core CPU and Multi-GPU Systems) is a parallel computing framework developed by Johan Enmyren and Christoph Kessler at Linköpings Universitet. This C++ template library provides a simple and unified interface for specifying data-parallel computations with the help of skeletons and is targeted to multiple backends e.g. for a sequential CPU, parallel CPUs using MPI and OpenMP or GPUs using CUDA and OpenCL. SkePU is comprised of seven data-parallel skeletons and one task-parallel skeleton and these skeletons use two types of containers: vector and matrix to model real-life parallel applications. In this thesis, we address the extension of the SkePU framework by extending the matrix container (which stores 2-D data values) that can efficiently use the existing skeletons to develop parallel scientific applications on large-scale clusters using MPI. This piece of work focuses on the distribution of the matrix among the participating processes which after receiving their share of data can execute the application in parallel. This work covers all of the seven data-parallel skeletons. Each skeleton has been tested with a small application program. In addition to measurement of performance improvement from the application program’s execution time, we have also done a communication cost analysis for all skeletons with MPI using the LogGP model. In order to evaluate and test the operational efficiency of the extension, we have considered a PDE solver application. Through this application, we have demonstrated the performance gain and scalability of the extended framework. The performance improvement was more when computational load dominates the memory I/O operations. The results show that using the extension can serve as a viable approach while implementing real-life parallel applications on large-scale clusters.
7

SkePU 2: Language Embedding and Compiler Support for Flexible and Type-Safe Skeleton Programming

Ernstsson, August January 2016 (has links)
This thesis presents SkePU 2, the next generation of the SkePU C++ framework for programming of heterogeneous parallel systems using the skeleton programming concept. SkePU 2 is presented after a thorough study of the state of parallel programming models, frameworks and tools, including other skeleton programming systems. The advancements in SkePU 2 include a modern C++11 foundation, a native syntax for skeleton parameterization with user functions, and an entirely new source-to-source translator based on Clang compiler front-end libraries. SkePU 2 extends the functionality of SkePU 1 by embracing metaprogramming techniques and C++11 features, such as variadic templates and lambda expressions. The results are improved programmability and performance in many situations, as shown in both a usability survey and performance evaluations on high-performance computing hardware. SkePU’s skeleton programming model is also extended with a new construct, Call, unique in the sense that it does not impose any predefined skeleton structure and can encapsulate arbitrary user-defined multi-backend computations. We conclude that SkePU 2 is a promising new direction for the SkePU project, and a solid basis for future work, for example in performance optimization.
8

Auto-tuning Hybrid CPU-GPU Execution of Algorithmic Skeletons in SkePU

Öhberg, Tomas January 2018 (has links)
The trend in computer architectures has for several years been heterogeneous systems consisting of a regular CPU and at least one additional, specialized processing unit, such as a GPU.The different characteristics of the processing units and the requirement of multiple tools and programming languages makes programming of such systems a challenging task. Although there exist tools for programming each processing unit, utilizing the full potential of a heterogeneous computer still requires specialized implementations involving multiple frameworks and hand-tuning of parameters.To fully exploit the performance of heterogeneous systems for a single computation, hybrid execution is needed, i.e. execution where the workload is distributed between multiple, heterogeneous processing units, working simultaneously on the computation. This thesis presents the implementation of a new hybrid execution backend in the algorithmic skeleton framework SkePU. The skeleton framework already gives programmers a user-friendly interface to algorithmic templates, executable on different hardware using OpenMP, CUDA and OpenCL. With this extension it is now also possible to divide the computational work of the skeletons between multiple processing units, such as between a CPU and a GPU. The results show an improvement in execution time with the hybrid execution implementation for all skeletons in SkePU. It is also shown that the new implementation results in a lower and more predictable execution time compared to a dynamic scheduling approach based on an earlier implementation of hybrid execution in SkePU.

Page generated in 0.1626 seconds