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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Supply chain performance measurement in the manufacturing industry:a single case study research to develop a supply chain performance measurement framework

Sillanpää, I. (Ilkka) 05 January 2011 (has links)
Abstract Supply chain performance measurement – the process of qualifying the efficiency and effectiveness of the supply chain. The aim of this study is to create a supply chain measurement framework for manufacturing industry, define what data should be measured and verify the measurement framework in the case company's supply chain. The research approach is hermeneutic and the research was a qualitative, constructive single case study research. The case company operates in the steel industry and provides prefabricated products for customers. The case supply chain was defined to be one supply chain in a plant where prefabricated products are produced. There is a review of the current understanding of supply chain management and literature related to supply chain performance measurement and the study creates a framework for supply chain measurement. This study presents the main theory framework of supply chain performance measurement. The key elements for the measurement framework were defined as time, profitability, order book analysis and managerial analysis. The measurement framework is tested by measuring case supply chain performance. The measurement framework is a valid framework for supply chain performance measurement in manufacturing industry. It is stated that supply chain performance measurement is extremely important in developing supply chain. The measurement framework in this study offers guidelines for measuring the supply chain in manufacturing industry but the measurement framework could be used in different areas of industry as well.
2

Supply chain performance measurement at a selected hospital in the Western Cape, South Africa

Mfengu, Zukile January 2019 (has links)
Thesis (MTech (Business Administration))--Cape Peninsula University of Technology, 2019 / Performance measurement of supply chain in the healthcare environment has presented with a number of challenges, and studies exist to confirm this. These problems include rising costs, excessive demands, shortage of supply, and escalating level of customer dissatisfaction are the true reflection of supply chain issues faced by the hospitals. This study aims to find out an effective solution to measure supply chain performance within a hospital in Cape Town. The relation among trust, SCM/IT integration, firm’s performance, and knowledge exchange were investigated. A mixed research method (both qualitative and quantitative) was conducted involving five managers and 80 employees from the hospital. A number of interviews and a close-ended questionnaire were used for data collection. Content analysis was used for qualitative data and the descriptive results were generated through SPSS V25. Hospital and healthcare environment have been used interchangeable in this study. The research findings showed that trust levels between the hospital and its suppliers has no direct impact on supplier integration, but that its influence is interceded by knowledge exchange. Knowledge exchange plays an important role in influencing supply chain performance in the hospital. IT integration and knowledge exchange have a positive impact on hospital–supplier logistical integration between the hospital and its suppliers. In addition, knowledge sharing in supply chain may subsequently build strong relationships among SCM partners and may automatically influence hospital performance. This study recommended that the hospital should develop an approach that facilitates the dynamics of the hospital in order to manage the buyer-supplier relationship. Further research can be done on factors that contribute to buyer/supplier trust development in the healthcare environment.
3

Linking entrepreneurial motivation, attitude, behaviour and sustainable supply chain performance measurement in South African manufacturing small and medium enterprises

Matsoso, Mamorena 11 September 2023 (has links) (PDF)
Background: Sustainable Supply Chain Performance Measurement (SSCPM) and management are pivotal processes for any organisation to ensure the attainment of strategic intent. Large enterprises have been successful with the implementation of SSCPM. One of the reasons is that their motives and attitudes are consistent with SSCPM that yield sustainable returns. First, large companies usually have shareholders who are not the management of these companies. This means the management of the company is held accountable for adopting practices that create sustainable shareholder value. As such, management's attitudes to issues such as SSCPM tend to be positive because of the implications on the bottom-line of the firm. Consequently, management's behaviour is one of quick and comprehensive adoption of any practices that support the creation of sustainable shareholder value, and that includes SSCPM. Second, large companies tend to be in the spotlight when it comes to anything that can go wrong. Finally, these companies are also under pressure from their global suppliers and customers, who may want SSCPMs to be embedded in their operations as a condition for doing business with them. We can therefore conclude that there are three aspects associated with the adoption of SSCPM by large companies, namely motivation, attitude, and behaviour. What is not clear is whether the same aspects of motivation, attitude and behaviours operate in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). This study focuses on three types of SMEs, namely necessity, opportunity, and legacy, as they relate to motives. Given the differences in ownership, management, and scope of operations between large companies and SMEs, do motives, attitudes and behavioural variables operate within SMEs in the context of the adoption of SSCPM? We do not seem to have enough research to answer this question. Therefore, this study seeks to understand how entrepreneurial motivation, attitude, and behaviour influence SSCPM in manufacturing SMEs. Moreover, SMEs, particularly in developing contexts, are still lagging behind with sustainability integration in their Supply Chain Management (SCM). While much is said about SMEs, there is less concern for integrated systems, SCM practices and their future. There is a dearth of research on how entrepreneurial motives, attitudes and behaviour influence these performance measurements by SMEs. Methodology: The researcher's purpose in this study was to observe reality as it existed to maintain an objectivity which is devoid of value judgements. This objectivity resonates with the researcher's philosophical view which lends itself to a functionalist paradigm. Quantitative data were collected through a survey of manufacturing SMEs on entrepreneurial motives, attitudes, and behaviour towards SSCPM. The survey was directly administered to approximately 566 manufacturing SMEs, of which 211 completed questionnaires were received. The data were analysed through Partial Least Square-structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM). Results: Opportunity-motivated entrepreneurs depict a positive attitude towards the adoption and implementation of SSCPM in their SCM. These SMEs are formed and run by professionals and experienced individuals who desire to grow their businesses. Legacy-motivated entrepreneurs do not show any attitudinal disposition towards SSCPM. As they are familyowned and run businesses that span many generations, legacy-entrepreneurs are likely to adopt the inherited culture in their practices. Necessity-entrepreneurs have a positive attitude towards SSCPM with a predominant focus on economic sustainability. They are mostly pushed into business by the need to survive and this makes them focus mostly on that which enables them to generate revenue while avoiding anything that entails having to invest in other areas. For instance, necessity-motivated entrepreneurs have a negative attitude towards environmental and social sustainability. The only time they begin to embrace it is when there are other forces around such as institutional pressures or resources that will directly affect their attitude towards SSCPM. The results reveal that institutional isomorphic patterns and resources impact in varying degrees on the SMEs' adoption and implementation of SSCPM. Government policies or coercive isomorphic pressures are generally weak about enforcing SSCPM at SMEs. For instance, limited resources hinder SMEs' willingness and ability to adopt and implement SSCPM practices in line with government policies. Limited resources therefore make the impact of government policies on the adoption and implementation of SSCPM at SMEs ineffective. The results showed that normative isomorphic pressures were major enablers of the adoption and implementation of SSCPM at SMEs. These normative pressures were mostly inflicted by large corporate customers who demanded that SMEs complied with sustainable sourcing and production. Mimetic isomorphic pressures come into play because of the need for all SMEs to attain economic sustainability. Resources are a major enabler for the adoption of environmental and social SSCPM while both the institution and resources shape the attitude of SMEs in a significant way towards sustainable developments. Lack of resources leads to a negative attitude to sustainability endeavours. Theoretical contribution: The study has contributed to sustainability literature, the interface among entrepreneurial motives, attitudes, and behaviour linkages with SSCPM. To the best of the researcher's knowledge this perspective has not been explored in either SCM or Sustainable Supply Chain Management (SSCM). Many frameworks in SCM focus on the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) from a measurement perspective. The framework created in this study interfaces SSCM with entrepreneurial motives, attitudes and behaviour in the adoption of SSCPM at manufacturing SMEs. It further places the application of theory (Institutional and Resource Based View Theories) in a new empirical situation; more importantly, confirming the inability of coercive pressures to be placed on the adoption of environmental and social sustainability while re-enforcing the impact of normative pressures on the uptake of SSCPM. The SMEs' entrepreneurial attitude towards environmental and social sustainability is predominantly negative without institutional isomorphic pressures and the direct impact of resources on their attitude towards SSCPM. The analysis methodology adopted in this study reveals the shortcomings of Cronbach Alpha, which is rarely, if not always, silent in the social sciences. Cronbach Alpha does not only measure internal reliability, but it is also a test of length. If Cronbach is used to test internal consistency where the items are few, the tau-equivalence is immediately violated and that decreases reliability. However, if the number of items in a scale are more, reliability increases. Researchers in the social sciences, particularly SCM researchers, ought to know about this revelation. Practical Implications: These results will assist governments to find strategies to support entrepreneurs that are intrinsically motivated towards adopting sustainable integration practices. Governments may also embark on a customer awareness programme to enforce the taking up of sustainability practices in organisations while also exerting pressure on entrepreneurs who exhibit a negative attitude towards SSCPM. This strategy will go a long way towards adopting sustainable integration practices. Normative pressures from large customers have been identified as major players in enforcing SSCM at manufacturing SMEs. Big corporations may partner with SME suppliers to assist and guide them through compliance and taking the necessary steps to achieve sustainability integration. Collaboration among SMEs may help mitigate resource constraints to adopting sustainability practices as this may enable collaborative efforts in assisting themselves to reach their SSCM goals. Practitioners may also provide training and development programmes on SSCM for manufacturing SMEs. These training programmes should be conducted at no cost (through government funding) with manufacturing SMEs to achieve a wider impact on sustainability advancement. SMEs are central to economic growth, hence providing support, mentoring, and coaching on SSCPM which may go a long way towards strengthening the sector. Government may fund special projects that address SDG 12 and bring about collaboration between international and local buyers to guide the process in these SMEs. This research provides a platform for SME development and the enhancement of the community. SMEs may engage with community activists and NGOs on how to create sustainable relationships that last longer than expected. Development communities ranging from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the World Bank and African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), among others, may form partnerships with developing countries' governments specifically to address SSCM at manufacturing SMEs. For instance, AGOA may extend primary access to United States' (US) markets by adding sustainability support on export apparel to manufacturing firms in listed countries. The World Bank could direct resource support with clear accountability measures to developing countries on manufacturing SSCM-integration, while USAID may have ambassadors/directors in various countries to oversee its dedicated support for sustainable production in the developing contexts.
4

Measuring and Evaluating the Supply Chain by implementing the BSC and investigating the quality of the Supply Chain: A case study at Giraff Technologies

Odontidou, Eleni January 2013 (has links)
In today’s world, globalization has increased the competition among companies and functioned as a factor for increased product variety, increased amount of customized products and shorter product life cycles. Supply Chain management is considered one of the most critical strategies for increasing organizational effectiveness and enhancing the customer service. Supply Chain needs to be evaluated based on its performance of how efficient and effective it is. Quality on products and processes has becoming even more critical to companies’ success. Zero defects on the components and parts that meet the customers’ needs are important for the quality of the final products and quality efforts can decrease the costs throughout the Supply Chain. Moreover, Supply Chain’s cost identification is getting even more important in order for the companies to evaluate the performance of their channel and realize the efficiency of their activities based on their supply chain processes. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how the implementation of a performance measurement system can assist companies to improve the Supply Chain based on the identification of the relation between the evaluation of the Supply Chain and the quality and service that is provided to the customer. Moreover, the cost of the production and the after-sales service is measured, in order to have a clear image of the Supply Chain performance. A case study company, Giraff Technologies, was examined and investigated further in order the author to be able to support the results and the analysis of the primary research combined with the analysis of the literature review. Based on the results of the research it can be said that the quality performance of a company and the service that is offered to the customers can be enhanced through the measurement and evaluation of the Supply Chain performance. Better collaboration with the suppliers and customers, customer focus and continuous improvements are ways to improve not only the Supply Chain but also the quality and the service that is offered. The production cost is considered as a factor that can be influenced positively or negatively by the Supply Chain performance, whereas the after-sale service cost is not clear if it can be affected immediately from the Supply Chain performance.
5

Supply chain relationships as predictors of supply chain performance in South African SMEs

Pfanelo, Nematatani 05 1900 (has links)
M. Tech. (Logistics management, Faculty of Management Sciences), Vaal University of Technology / The growth and development of SCM is attributed to number of factors such as partnership, collaboration, integration and relationship commitment. Despite increasing awareness of the importance of joint venture to organisations, research on the supply chain relationships (supply chain partnership, collaboration, integration and relationship commitment) and performance have received little attention. Therefore, using a data set of 271 individuals from the small and medium enterprise (SMEs) sector in South Africa, this study examines the influence of supply chain partnerships on collaboration, collaboration on integration, integration on relationship commitment and relationship commitment on performance. Structural equation modeling (SEM) method was used to analyses the data collected whereby individuals agrees with that supply chain relationships increase performance in the work environment. The study has developed a supply chain management (SCM)-based performance measurement system (PMS) for the case of SMEs. Such a framework may help SMEs managers to establish their own supply chain functions and strategically plan improvements for weak areas. In addition, it may remain helpful for benchmarking current practices with industry norms requirements. Quite often, companies dealing with a large number of performance measures derived and expanded based on the suggestions from employees, consultants and past experiences (history) forget to realise that supply chain performance measurement can be better addressed when they joint venture.
6

Collaborative Supply Chain Performance Measurement Systems : A multiple case study on the OTD-process of manufacturing SMEs in the Swedish lighting industry / Collaborative Supply Chain Performance Measurement Systems : A multiple case study on the OTD-process of manufacturing SMEs in the Swedish lighting industry

Svensson, Arvid, Gustafsson, Frida, Guillaume, Julien January 2019 (has links)
Title: Collaborative Supply Chain Performance Measurement Systems. A multiple case study on the OTD-process of manufacturing SMEs in the Swedish lighting industry. Authors: Arvid Svensson, Frida Gustafsson and Julien Guillaume. Background: Even though the multiple stated benefits of Supply Chain Performance Measurement Systems (SCPMS) to enhance the collaboration, there is a lack of research, especially regarding the presence among Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SME). Closely associated with the presence of a SCPMS are the challenges. Research on SCPMS and the accompanied challenges have been made in multiple fields and contexts. Yet, SCPMS in the Order to Delivery (OTD)-process between a SME lighting manufacturer and their key customers is missing. Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate to what level collaboration regarding SCPMS is present in the OTD-process among the cases studied as well as explain this level of collaboration by studying the challenges of SCPMS. The aim is to contribute to existing literature with an explanatory model that highlights the challenges for a highly collaborative SCPMS with their key customers. This model should also give practical contributions to the case companies. Method: A multiple case study have been conducted. Qualitative data has been gathered through semi-structured interviews. Findings and Conclusion: The findings show that the level of collaboration in the SCPMS differs from no presence at all to an almost total high presence in the cases studied. The criteria that were found in previous literature for high collaboration in the SCPMS were overall similar to the practices found in the cases. Most of the challenges found in previous research were able to explain the difference in level of collaboration in the SCPMS. The two major challenges were lack of knowledge and lack of will. Lack of knowledge was present where the will to progress was clear, while also in one case, there was not even a will to progress. Overall, the company with low level and will to progress was most likely to perceive challenges, while the company with the highest level perceived the least challenges.

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