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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Risks in new product development (NPD) projects

Akram Afzal, Muhammad 01 1900 (has links)
New product development (NPD) is vulnerable to a wide variety of risks arising from within the firm or from the external environment. Existing categorizations of NPD project risks are partial or ill-defined and consequently there is no clear consensus among researchers and practitioners about what constitute NPD project risks. To address this gap, this thesis deploys a systematic literature methodology to inductively develop a comprehensive risk taxonomy from a review of 124 empirical studies. This taxonomy is then empirically validated through a survey capturing data from 263 NPD projects conducted by UK firms. The thesis further investigated the moderating effect of NPD project type (incremental or radical), firm size (SMEs and large firms) and industry sectors on the proposed risk taxonomy. Variation in the perceptions of NPD risk by different members of the team was explored as well. The findings revealed that the principal risk factors affecting NPD projects are technological rapidity risk, supply chain risk, lack of funding and resource risk. The risk profile of radical NPD projects differed to that of incremental projects. SMEs were more vulnerable to NPD project risks than large firms. Most risks influenced NPD projects equally across industrial sectors. Members of NPD project teams from different backgrounds or with different roles perceived risks differently. The proposed taxonomy and its subsequent empirical validation provides a comprehensive and robust taxonomy for identifying and managing risks associated with different types of NPD project conducted by firms of varying sizes from different industrial sectors.
2

Risks in new product development (NPD) projects

Akram Afzal, Muhammad January 2017 (has links)
New product development (NPD) is vulnerable to a wide variety of risks arising from within the firm or from the external environment. Existing categorizations of NPD project risks are partial or ill-defined and consequently there is no clear consensus among researchers and practitioners about what constitute NPD project risks. To address this gap, this thesis deploys a systematic literature methodology to inductively develop a comprehensive risk taxonomy from a review of 124 empirical studies. This taxonomy is then empirically validated through a survey capturing data from 263 NPD projects conducted by UK firms. The thesis further investigated the moderating effect of NPD project type (incremental or radical), firm size (SMEs and large firms) and industry sectors on the proposed risk taxonomy. Variation in the perceptions of NPD risk by different members of the team was explored as well. The findings revealed that the principal risk factors affecting NPD projects are technological rapidity risk, supply chain risk, lack of funding and resource risk. The risk profile of radical NPD projects differed to that of incremental projects. SMEs were more vulnerable to NPD project risks than large firms. Most risks influenced NPD projects equally across industrial sectors. Members of NPD project teams from different backgrounds or with different roles perceived risks differently. The proposed taxonomy and its subsequent empirical validation provides a comprehensive and robust taxonomy for identifying and managing risks associated with different types of NPD project conducted by firms of varying sizes from different industrial sectors.
3

Taxonomies of software ecosystem health metrics and practices: a systematic literature review

Yousef Zadeh Shooshtari, Arman 21 December 2020 (has links)
Context: Since the beginnings of software engineering, metrics (such as SLOCs) and practices have been used in an attempt to measure and improve the features of software development projects, their process, or their contributors. Measuring and enhancing software ecosystem features brings a new complexity level because a software ecosystem comprises several interrelated software projects. Over the past two decades, software ecosystems have gained considerable attention, and researchers have proposed various metrics and practices to measure and improve software ecosystems' health. Objective: This thesis presents a systematic literature review that aims to build comprehensive taxonomies for software ecosystem health metrics and practices. These taxonomies synthesize the results of previous categorizations and update them with newer metrics and practices proposed since then. This study also aims to collect and synthesize all the definitions, metrics, and practices proposed to define, measure, and improve software ecosystem health in the literature. Method: I conducted a systematic literature review and identified 40 primary studies related to defining and measuring software ecosystem health. I extracted the definitions, metrics, and practices for software ecosystem health from the primary studies, and then I categorized the metrics and practices to build the taxonomies. Results: I identified a total of 7 different definitions for software ecosystem health, 142 different metrics, and 174 various practices for software ecosystem health. Our taxonomies for software ecosystem health metrics and practices have three categories (niche creation, productivity, and robustness). Each of these categories has several sub-categories of metrics and practices. Conclusion: Software ecosystems have a wide range of stakeholders that have different perspectives regarding software ecosystem health. To satisfy this spectrum, researchers have proposed various metrics and practices to measure and improve software ecosystems' health. To improve unifying contrasting opinions, I conducted this study. The metrics and practices proposed are diverse in both purpose and the data required to compute them. Some metrics are presented along with a method on how to compute them. In contrast, others are defined abstractly without an operational approach to calculate them, and some are mentioned without a clear rationale. Furthermore, the same metric or practice is often proposed in more than one publication using different names. This thesis addresses these alignment problems. / Graduate
4

Agile supply partnerships : the paradox of high-involvement and short-term supply relationships in the Macerata-Fermo footwear district

Cerruti, Corrado 08 1900 (has links)
Despite a general consensus concerning the relevance of supply partnerships to agility, the literature reveals disagreements and contradictions regarding their characteristics and, in particular, their duration. This is, whether partnerships in an agile strategy should be long-term (strategic partnerships) or short-term (agile partnerships). The research joins this debate by investigating the types and characteristics of supply partnerships to achieve agility. The underlying premise of the work is that the type of supply partnership is contingent on the degree of turbulence an agile strategy is designed to face. The research was carried out in the fashion industry, given the relevance of agility in this industry. Specifically, the research focused the supply partnerships developed by the footwear companies in the Macerata-Fermo district, the largest footwear district in Italy. The focus on district companies allow the comparison of several companies sharing a very similar business context, allowing a better control of external variables and increasing the internal validity of the study. The field research consisted of a preliminary survey on agility drivers and agile capabilities in the Macerata-Fermo footwear district, followed by an in-depth investigation on supply partnerships using multiple embedded cases studies. Overall six medium-large footwear companies have been analysed in their supply relationships with respect to five key supply categories. For each supply category, the buyer view of the focal firms has been complemented with a view from the supplier side. In total the fieldwork is built upon 30 interviews with 22 informants from 18 companies for a total of more than 23 hours of interviews. In all cases, except two, the key informant was owner, CEO or general manager of the company, eventually supported by another company manager. In two cases, the interviews data have been strengthened by a longitudinal analysis of purchase orders over eight years. The fieldwork highlights that agility drivers and agile capabilities impact on the footwear companies’ decision of developing agile supply partnerships. Specifically footwear companies that are under the pressure of high-turbulence agility drivers (here represented by a high collection renewal rate) and that have developed strong agile capabilities (here represented by a local supply network and a purchase orders postponement) choose agile supply partnerships with respect to supply categories that are sensitive to the fashion trends and therefore difficult to be sourced in a stable way – season after season – from the same suppliers. The main contribution to theory is related to the characteristics of supply partnerships in an agile strategy and specifically to the apparent paradox of “high-involvement & short- term” relationships (i.e. agile supply partnerships). In spite of the presence of time compression diseconomies in building up partnership and of the loss of relational (non- redeployable) benefits in closing down partnerships, scenarios of high-turbulence can give companies an incentive to look for short-term partnerships. Such finding can support a wider claim that different levels of turbulence call for different agility strategies requiring different capabilities and practices. The main contribution to practice is related to the way agile partnerships are selected, started and ended. Given that many industries are facing an increase in market turbulence, it appears that many companies – even outside the fashion industry – might have to learn how to balance high-involvement supply relationships with respect to a shorter time horizon.
5

Evidence-Based Reviews: History, Utility, and Application

Field, Lindsey 1982- 02 October 2013 (has links)
Performing evidence-based reviews (EBR) is a growing and important area of research, and more graduate students should be educated in this area. EBRs provide conclusions based on science and follow a specific methodology to decrease bias, consider all pertinent science on the topic, and have transparency. This thesis is two-fold and includes: 1) a faculty course manual on how to facilitate a college course on EBR and 2) an EBR manuscript on the utility of nutrition labeling to affect consumers’ ability to select more nutritious products and whether or not nutrition labeling can affect purchase and consumption of more nutritious products. This EBR is timely in that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has called for a moratorium on Front-of-Pack labeling (FOP) until two Institute of Medicine Committees have produced their reports and FDA has interpreted those reports. The intention of the manuscript is that it will aid in this interpretation. Of 978 articles collected, 699 were excluded using exclusion/inclusion criteria, 253 were identified as secondary articles, and 26 were used for the EBR. Results: Ten studies answered question #1 on whether or not consumers can pick a more nutritious product by reading labels and 21 answered question #2 on whether consumers actually change their purchasing and/or eating behavior by using labels. Studies ranged from simple cross-sectional studies that used survey data to more complex studies that collected sales data or performed in-store observations. In conclusion, consumers are able to use food labels to pick more nutritious products. Preliminary evidence suggests that a subset of health conscious consumers will read food labels to select a healthier product within a product category. Less evidence exists that reading labels actually results in a change of food intake. More intervention rather than survey studies are required to address this issue. In addition, the next stages of investigation should include looking at the whole diet, rather than just individual foods, and finally what affect the whole diet may have on overall health.
6

Interplay between network configurations and network governance mechanisms in supply networks a systematic literature review

Habib, Farooq 10 1900 (has links)
Purpose: This work systematically reviews the extant academic management literature on supply networks. It specifically examines how network configurations and network governance mechanisms influence each other in supply networks. Design: 125 analytical and empirical studies were identified using an evidence-based approach to review the literature mainly published between 1985 and 2012. Synthesis: Drawing on a multi-disciplinary theoretical foundation, this work develops an integrative framework to identify three distinct yet interdependent themes that characterize the study of supply networks: a) Network Configurations (structures and relationships); b) Network Governance Mechanisms (formal and informal); and c) The Interplay between Network Configurations and Network Governance Mechanisms. Findings: Network configurations and network governance mechanisms mutually influence each other and cannot be considered in isolation. Formal and informal governance mechanisms provide better control when used as complements rather than as substitutes. The choice of governance mechanism depends on the nature of exchange; role of management; desired level of control; level of flexibility in formal contracts; and complementary role of formal and informal governance mechanism. Research implications: This nascent field has thematic and methodological research opportunities for academics. Comparative network analysis using longitudinal case studies offers a rich area for further study. Practical Implications: The complexity surrounding the conflicting roles of managers at the organisation and network levels poses a significant challenge during the development and implementation stage of strategic network policies. Originality/value: This review reveals that formal and informal governance mechanisms provide better control when used as complements rather than as substitutes.
7

The governing dynamics of stock-bond return co-movements: a systematic literature review

Mandal, Anandadeep 08 1900 (has links)
Understanding stock-bond return correlation is a key facet in asset mix, asset allocation and in an investor’s portfolio optimisation strategy. For the last couple of decades, several studies have probed this cardinal relationship. While initial literature tries to understand the fundamental pattern of co-movements, later studies aim to model the economic state variables influencing such time-varying volatility behaviour of stock-bond returns. This study provides a systematic literature review in the field of stock and bond return correlation. The review investigates the existing literature in three key dimensions. First, it examines the effect of macro-economic variables on SB return co-movements. Second, it illustrates the effect of financial integration on the asset correlation dynamics. Third, it reviews the existing models that are employed to estimate the dynamic relationship. In addition to the systematic review, I conduct an empirical analysis of stock-bond return co-movements on U.S. capital market. Both the literature and the empirical investigation substantiate my claims on existing research gaps and respective scope for further research. Evidence shows that existing models impose strong restrictions on past stock-bond return variance dynamics and yield inconclusive results. I, therefore, propose an alternative method, i.e. copula function approach, to model stock and bond time-varying co-movements. Since the previous studies largely focus on developed economies, I suggest an empirically investigation of emerging economies as well. This will allow me to examine the effect of financial integration on the dynamic asset return correlation. Apart from this academic contribution, the study provides an illustration of the economic implications which relate to portfolio optimization and minimal-risk hedge ratio.
8

Maternal and professional identity change during the transition to motherhood

Kutzer, Roxanne 08 1900 (has links)
Becoming a mother derails many women’s chances for career progression. One reason for this is that women leave organisations when they become mothers, or reduce their working hours. Another reason is that people within the organisation start to view them as less career-orientated as a result of being mothers. At the core of this issue is that who a woman is – her identity – is being redefined in the transition to motherhood, by herself and by those around her. But, little is known about how her professional identity develops during the transition to motherhood, or whether its development is related to her growing maternal identity. This paper, therefore, presents a systematic review of the literature concerning changes in maternal and professional identities, as well as the relationship between them. Based on the evidence, this review concludes that although the development of maternal identity has been well documented in the literature, little is known about how a woman’s professional identity develops, as she becomes a mother. Suggestions for further research and practice are discussed.
9

The Challenges and Mitigation Strategies of Using DevOps during Software Development

Yiran, Zhou, Yilei, Liu January 2017 (has links)
No description available.
10

Adopting DevOps in Agile: Challenges and Solutions

Wang, Cheng, Liu, Changling January 2018 (has links)
Background. DevOps is a hot topic in recent years. It emphasizes the combination of development and operation. Agile is one of the most popular development methods, but Agile mainly focused on software development part, there is no more involvement in deployment and operations. In this case, many companies consider adopting DevOps in Agile to attempt to improve the situation. Objectives. The combination of two different technologies is bound to produce some challenges, whether it is for practitioners or researchers, it is very important to find these challenges and mitigate them, so this article aims to investigate the challenges of adopting DevOps in Agile, then through the systematic literature review and survey questionnaire to determine the corresponding mitigation strategy. Then, in order to detail understand the process of adopting DevOps in Agile, we use interview to research the real process of adopting DevOps in agile. Methods. According to our research question, we used the systematic literature review(SLR), survey questionnaire and interview as our research methodology. Through literature review, we collected data of adopting DevOps in Agile, and summary the challenges and its relevant mitigation strategies. Then survey questionnaire helped us linking the content of literature to the industry, and compare their difference. Through the interview, we explored the actual process of adopting DevOps in Agile in industry, and correspond the challenges to the actual process. Results. Our study summarized the software development process of adopting DevOps based on Agile and revealed 23 challenges and corresponding mitigation strategies. The report also compares the commonalities and gaps between the results from the literature and the findings of real-life adopting of DevOps challenges and mitigation strategies. Conclusions. In this article, we introduced the challenges and corresponding mitigation strategies for adopting DevOps based on agile and summarize the corresponding software development process. The obvious challenges and mitigation strategies were divided into four categories: 1) People 2) Project 3) Process 4) Organization, after which we conducted further discussions based on the actual conditions and compared the results of systematic literature review and the results of questionnaire to detail explore their difference.

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