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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES ENGAGING IN SERIOUS ILLNESS COMMUNICATION AND PERCEPTIONS OF SERIOUS ILLNESS CONVERSATION GUIDE TRAINING: A QUALITATIVE DESCRIPTIVE STUDY / UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES ENGAGING IN SERIOUS ILLNESS COMMUNICATION

Morkunas, Rachel January 2020 (has links)
Background: While serious illness communication is an important aspect of nursing care, it is recognized as an area of practice for which nursing students are not adequately prepared. Communication tools such as the Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) may help address these gaps in knowledge and skill. Aim: The aim of this study is to explore undergraduate nursing students’ experiences engaging in serious illness communication and their perceptions about participation in a SICG workshop that aimed to improve such communication. Methods: A qualitative descriptive approach was used. One-on-one, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight undergraduate nursing students at McMaster University who had attended SICG training. Critical incident technique was used to elicit participant accounts of engaging in serious illness communication at their professional practice placements. Data were analyzed using qualitative techniques. Participants were surveyed to assess perceptions of the SICG workshop. Findings: Three themes related to undergraduate nursing students’ experiences engaging in serious illness communication after receiving SICG training were: a) serious illness communication is challenging to enact, b) finding moral and ethical ground, and c) fitting into the culture of the professional practice setting. Three themes related to nursing students’ perceptions of the SICG workshop were: a) applicability of SICG training to practice, b) strengths of SICG training, and c) limited opportunities to develop competence. Conclusions: Nursing students are challenged by serious illness communication in their practice. Findings support the integration of educational resources aimed to better prepare them for critical communication knowledge and skills on entry-to-practice. / Thesis / Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)
2

The magnitude of intra-professional violence that South African undergraduate nursing students are exposed to in the clinical learning environment

Engelbrecht, Natasjha 14 December 2011 (has links)
The number of new graduates greatly affects the existence of any profession and for the nursing profession this rings very true. However, in this caring and nurturing profession many undergraduate nursing students indicate that they consider leaving the profession due to exposure to intra-professional violence. Intra-professional violence may take many forms, is perpetrated by different individuals and have negative effects on patients, staff and institutions therefore it should be identified and managed. In South Africa it has, so far, been a topic which has not received much attention. Purpose Determine the presence of intra-professional violence experienced by undergraduate nursing students in South Africa and then create an awareness of intra-professional violence to eliminate the occurrence thereof. Design A quantitative, non-experimental, explorative and descriptive design was used. Methods The data was collected by means of a questionnaire. The questionnaire was distributed to undergraduate nursing students at nine NEI in South Africa. Findings Although characteristics of oppressed group behaviour are present in undergraduate nursing students it to a low extent. Undergraduate nursing students are experiencing intra-professional violence in the clinical learning environment from different perpetrators. The most likely perpetrator is the registered nurse. The intra-professional violence does cause stress but are deemed controllable according to the undergraduate nursing students. Furthermore the results show that the presence of stress results in an increased control of intra-professional violence. The most likely coping mechanism for intra-professional violence is to do nothing. Conclusion The findings correlated with international results and indicate that intra-professional violence is experienced by undergraduate nursing students in South Africa. Oppressed group behaviour is a contributing factor, but is not the sole cause. Undergraduate nursing students do need education about intra-professional violence and engaging coping mechanisms. Clinical relevance If intra-professional violence is controlled, interpersonal relationships can improve. This would create an environment in which learning can be promoted and undergraduate nursing students will be able to develop their clinical skills with confidence. Furthermore, attrition will decline and nursing shortages can be countered. / Dissertation (MCur)--University of Pretoria, 2012. / Nursing Science / unrestricted
3

Baccalaureate Nursing Students’ Perceptions of Community Health Nursing as a Career

Duah, Maame Akyaa January 2015 (has links)
Background: There has been an increasing shift in patient care from the acute hospital setting to the community. Nurses play an essential role as part of the community health care workforce; however, only a limited number of baccalaureate nursing students tend to choose a career in community health nursing after graduation. There is currently a gap in knowledge surrounding nursing students’ perception of a career in Community Health Nursing and the issues influencing their career choice upon graduation. Purpose: To explore issues that influence career choice in community health nursing from the perspective of baccalaureate nursing students. Research Methodology: The study was guided by a descriptive qualitative research approach. Individual semi-guided interviews and focus groups were conducted with 11 nursing students and a group of key stakeholders to share their thoughts on pursuing a career in community health nursing and the factors that enabled or hindered their decision making. Thematic analysis of the interview and focus group data generated relevant themes. Findings: Five major themes were revealed from study. These are 1) defining community health nursing, 2) the clinical practicum experience, 3) stereotypes of community health nursing, 4) societal trends and expectations, and 5) issues influencing career choice in community health nursing. Discussion and Implications: The personal and contextual factors influencing the perceptions and attitudes of students towards pursuing community health nursing were discussed. Existing literature was integrated into the discussion of the many factors that both motivated and hindered baccalaureate nursing students from pursuing community health nursing. The underrepresentation of new graduates in community health nursing calls for directed efforts by community health nursing organizations and the university to improve the situation. Conscientious efforts need to be made to provide students with knowledge and information surrounding the roles of community health nurses and the opportunities for nursing students and nurses in community health nursing settings. Conclusion: There is a need to increase awareness about community health nursing in order for nursing students to understand the importance and impact it has on the health status of communities and healthcare delivery infrastructure. Nursing education programs would be an ideal platform for this awareness-raising and facilitate student nurses decision to pursue community health nursing as a career.
4

Test-Taking Strategies for Undergraduate Nursing Students

Merriman, Carolyn S. 01 October 1998 (has links)
No description available.
5

Confronting the Trend of Mental Illness Stigma in Undergraduate Nursing Students: An Anti-Stigma Education Pilot Study

Davenport, Nikki, , MSN, RN, FNP-C 23 April 2023 (has links)
Abstract Purpose: Mental illness in the United States is a well-documented prevalent health concern. Mental health conditions are extensive and subject to mental illness stigma that negatively impacts client care. Aims: This quality improvement project aims to implement the NAMI In Our Own Voices presentation in conjunction with a ninety-minute anti-stigma educational session to reduce mental illness stigma among nursing students. Methods: This quality improvement project utilizes a pretest-posttest study design to evaluate the implementation of the National Alliance on Mental Illness In Our Own Voices presentation in conjunction with a ninety-minute anti-stigma educational session’s impact on mental illness stigma reduction. The Open Minds Stigma Scale for Health Care providers will be used to determine the level of stigma reduction in undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. Results: Results are pending project implementation approval from the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Conclusion: No conclusion can be determined at this time as study results are pending.
6

An action research study on interprofessional education with nursing and medical students in Germany

Mueller-Froehlich, Christa January 2017 (has links)
Background: In Germany, the process of moving pre-registration nursing education into higher education within a faculty of medicine has differed from developments at universities of applied sciences. This is because such a process implies radical change for the status of and relationship between nurses and physicians. Literature review: The body of knowledge on interprofessional undergraduate education of nursing and medical students, including work on the nurse-physician relationship and collaborative practices of nurses and physicians, provides the foundation of this research. Aim: The primary aim has been to involve the active participation of educational practitioners of the nursing and medical professions concerned in working towards a collaborative culture, including interprofessional undergraduate education for nursing and medical students. Methodology and methods: A participatory paradigm position guided this research, using cooperative inquiry as one approach in action research. The inquiry group decided on the methods to be used for the inquiry and planned, acted out, and reflected on eight interprofessional educational sessions in three cycles over a process of two years. Data from inquiry group members' experiences were audiotaped during this process and analysed with a focus on experiential and propositional knowledge development. Inquiry group members gained feedback from nursing and medical students after their interprofessional sessions in eight group discussions. Framework analysis of qualitative data was used to guide data analysis. In addition, students had the option to provide feedback by completing a questionnaire to evaluate the sessions. For the analysis of the questionnaire data descriptive statistics was used. Findings: The 3P model (presage, process, product) was used as a meta-structure for the IPE_NUMESO model to guide further classroom teaching of nursing and medical students. It was found that undergraduate education of nursing and medical students is a complex social process accompanied by mixed emotions and a strong desire to overcome the separation of both professions. Discussion: The research adds new insight into IPE for undergraduate nursing and medical students: emotions, values, and a problematic reality in which both groups of professionals work together (presage), role change in simulation, the asset of a safe learning environment, peer learning, and strategies to overcome the separation (process). Certain experiences are proposed to be worthwhile (product), such as being able to understand the essence of clinical situations and deal with issues like emotions, values, knowledge and its communication, clinical experience, and power. Social learning theory provided a suitable explanatory approach for the findings. Conclusion and recommendations: This research adds to the knowledge on interprofessional education for undergraduate education for nursing and medical students. Considering IPE as a complex social process offers promising potential to transform future collaborative practices by preparing students for a complex and dynamic collaboration of both professions at the patient's bedside. Recommendations for clinical practice, interprofessional education, and policy are presented.
7

An investigation into the knowledge and practice of undergraduate nursing students regarding universal precautions and their fear of occupational exposure to blood borne pathogens.

Berg, Lindy Sheryldene. January 2009 (has links)
<p>Background: Health care workers, more specifically, nursing students are at increased risk of occupational injury and exposure to blood borne pathogens. Compliance with universal precautions (UP) will minimise risk or transmission of HIV and HBV (Hepatitis B virus) according to the Department of Health of South Africa. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and practice of universal precautions amongst nursing students and their fear of occupational exposure to blood borne pathogens. Rationale: The rationale for the study was to investigate what the students&rsquo / knowledge and practice of UP were, to see if this could be a possible contributing factor to occupational exposure. Research design: The study was a quantitative, cross sectional survey using a questionnaire that included one open ended question. Participants: The participants for the study were the undergraduate nursing students in year levels two to four (n = 253) who and were selected by means of stratified random sampling. Procedures: A questionnaire was administered to the participants by the researcher. Analysis of the data collected was done through statistical package for social sciences (SPSS 16.0) and content analysis. Results: The researcher established that there is indeed a lack of knowledge regarding UP and that the students&rsquo / self reported practice of UP is poor. No statistically significant correlation between knowledge and practice of UP were found. There is underreporting of occupational exposures to staff at the School of Nursing. The majority of students reported a moderate to severe fear for occupational exposures and contributing factors raised by them are reality in the clinical facilities.</p>
8

An investigation into the knowledge and practice of undergraduate nursing students regarding universal precautions and their fear of occupational exposure to blood borne pathogens.

Berg, Lindy Sheryldene. January 2009 (has links)
<p>Background: Health care workers, more specifically, nursing students are at increased risk of occupational injury and exposure to blood borne pathogens. Compliance with universal precautions (UP) will minimise risk or transmission of HIV and HBV (Hepatitis B virus) according to the Department of Health of South Africa. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and practice of universal precautions amongst nursing students and their fear of occupational exposure to blood borne pathogens. Rationale: The rationale for the study was to investigate what the students&rsquo / knowledge and practice of UP were, to see if this could be a possible contributing factor to occupational exposure. Research design: The study was a quantitative, cross sectional survey using a questionnaire that included one open ended question. Participants: The participants for the study were the undergraduate nursing students in year levels two to four (n = 253) who and were selected by means of stratified random sampling. Procedures: A questionnaire was administered to the participants by the researcher. Analysis of the data collected was done through statistical package for social sciences (SPSS 16.0) and content analysis. Results: The researcher established that there is indeed a lack of knowledge regarding UP and that the students&rsquo / self reported practice of UP is poor. No statistically significant correlation between knowledge and practice of UP were found. There is underreporting of occupational exposures to staff at the School of Nursing. The majority of students reported a moderate to severe fear for occupational exposures and contributing factors raised by them are reality in the clinical facilities.</p>
9

The effect of an experiential learning strategy on nursing students' knowledge and attitudes toward older people in Taiwan

Pan, I-Ju January 2007 (has links)
The aim of the research was to improve Taiwanese undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward and knowledge about older people in order to encourage them to work with older people. People aged 65 and over currently make up 9.7% of the Taiwanese population (Department of Statistics 2006). With the increasing population of older people, health care professionals will have more experiences of caring for older people. However, an increasingly large body of literature suggests that most health care professionals have negative attitudes toward older people and little knowledge about older people. Studies from Western countries have indicated that attitudes toward and knowledge about older people can be improved through a variety of educational efforts. Two studies were conducted to examine these issues. Study 1 involved a cross sectional survey of 302 nursing students from four-year and two-year programs in a university in southern Taiwan. Overall, the results showed that nursing students held positive attitudes toward older people but had poor knowledge about older people. Moreover, the findings suggested that nursing students' intention to work with older people and gender were important factors influencing their attitudes toward older people. Age, nursing program, and living with older people were the variables which made independent contributions to knowledge about older people. Study 2 was a quasi-experimental design using pre-post tests with an intervention (experiental based learning) and control group (usual lecture based learning) (n = 60) to test the impact of a gerontological educational subject. Focus group data were also collected to examine students' reactions to the gerontological nursing subject and the experiential learning strategies used in an experiential-based learning group. The sample was students in the second semester of their second year from the same university used for Study 1. All 60 students were randomly assigned into either experiential-based learning or lecture-based learning groups for their gerontological nursing subject. The data were collected across three time points (pre-test, week 16 and week 20) using 2 validated instruments from Study 1. Qualitative data were also collected from the experimental group after students' clinical practice at week 20. In order to test for the effect of the intervention over time, repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine the effectiveness of the experiential learning approach and clinical practice on each of the dependent variables of attitudes and knowledge. The results of Study 2 indicated that students' attitudes toward and knowledge about older people did not differ between the two groups In addition, there was no change in attitudes following the completion of the gerontological nursing subject. Students in both groups had improved their level of knowledge at the end of the gerontological subject. Therefore, the study hypotheses were not supported. Several factors such as lack of linkage between theoretical concepts and experience, the dominant 'exam culture', students' usual learning style and the structure of the program may explain the results. This was the first study which had introduced experiential learning into the selected university. It was necessary to conduct this initial study to understand the students' reaction to it. Therefore, based on the research findings from both the quantitative and qualitative results, the study indicates that additional studies are needed to continue exploring how experiential learning strategies may be used to improve students' attitudes toward and knowledge about older people.
10

The Factors Influencing the Self-Efficacy of Nursing Preceptors

Bugarski, Maja 10 September 2018 (has links)
Background. In Canadian baccalaureate nursing education, many schools pair their nursing students with a nurse preceptor to complete a consolidation placement in their final year of studies. The preceptor plays an important role in students’ learning and their success in the program. Although there are many factors that may influence preceptors’ ability to be successful in the role, the literature suggests that self-efficacy may affect their performance as a preceptors and may have an impact on students’ learning and their preceptorship experience. Self-efficacy is defined as a person’s confidence in their abilities to complete a task or goal. As such, preceptors with greater self-efficacy may be more effective in their role and may have a positive impact on students’ learning. Therefore, it is important to assess factors that influence preceptors’ self-efficacy as this knowledge could help inform and target the development of preceptor training programs, preceptor selection criteria and preceptor supports. Objectives. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the factors that affect the self-efficacy of preceptors. Five factors were investigated, including: (1) nursing experience, (2) preceptor experience, (3) vicarious preceptor experience, (4) preceptor training, and (5) the personality trait neuroticism. These variables are derived from Bandura’s (1986) theory of self-efficacy. Design. This study was conducted using a cross-sectional, non-experimental study design. Methods. A total of 95 nurse preceptors participated in the study by completing an online survey and were recruited using multiple strategies, including social media. The survey was comprised of demographic questions, a measure of the Big-Five personality traits, and a measure of clinical teaching self-efficacy. Correlation, independent t-tests and ANOVAs were done to analyze the data. Results. A statistically significant correlation was found between self-efficacy and two independent variables: nursing experience (r = 0.33, p < 0.01) and the personality trait of neuroticism (r = -0.21, p = .05). Additionally, self-efficacy was correlated with agreeableness (r = 0.22, p = .03) and age (r = 0.41, p < 0.01). A statistically significant difference in self-efficacy was found between diploma and bachelor degree nurses (mean difference = 0.37, p = .02), and bachelor degree and graduate degree nurses (mean difference = -0.45, p = .02). Conclusion. Three key results were found to influence the self-efficacy of nurse preceptors. This knowledge can be incorporated into preceptor training, preceptor support and the preceptor selection process.

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