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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Factors influencing the willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies by cooperative-oriented agribusinesses in Rwanda: evidence from the Abahuzamugambi Coffee Growers Cooperative of Maraba.

Haba, Sharon 29 August 2005 (has links)
This study was designed to identify the factors influencing the willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies among the farmers in the Abahuzamugambi Coffee Growers Cooperative located in Butare, Rwanda. Three hundred and six farmers responded to a questionnaire that included questions about their demographic characteristics and accessibility to agricultural information technologies. Results were computed using the mean and standard deviation. T-tests and analysis of variance were conducted to determine the relationship between farmers?? demographic characteristics and their willingness to pay for selected agricultural information delivery technologies. Findings indicate that there was a correlation between farmers?? willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies and some of their demographic characteristics. The farmer-to-farmer delivery technology was the most preferred as reflected by the amount of money that farmers were willing to pay for it compared to expert visits, print, radio, and television. Therefore, this technology was considered to be the most compatible with farmers?? needs in general.
2

Factors influencing the willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies by cooperative-oriented agribusinesses in Rwanda: evidence from the Abahuzamugambi Coffee Growers Cooperative of Maraba.

Haba, Sharon 29 August 2005 (has links)
This study was designed to identify the factors influencing the willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies among the farmers in the Abahuzamugambi Coffee Growers Cooperative located in Butare, Rwanda. Three hundred and six farmers responded to a questionnaire that included questions about their demographic characteristics and accessibility to agricultural information technologies. Results were computed using the mean and standard deviation. T-tests and analysis of variance were conducted to determine the relationship between farmers?? demographic characteristics and their willingness to pay for selected agricultural information delivery technologies. Findings indicate that there was a correlation between farmers?? willingness to pay for agricultural information delivery technologies and some of their demographic characteristics. The farmer-to-farmer delivery technology was the most preferred as reflected by the amount of money that farmers were willing to pay for it compared to expert visits, print, radio, and television. Therefore, this technology was considered to be the most compatible with farmers?? needs in general.
3

Sensory influences on consumers' wilingness to pay : the apple and cherry markets

Hu, Ying, January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Washington State University, May 2007. / Includes bibliographical references.
4

Essays on risk aversion

Jindapon, Paan 30 October 2006 (has links)
This dissertation contains three essays on risk aversion. In the first essay, we an- alyze comparative risk aversion in a new way, through a comparative statics problem in which, for a cost, agents can shift from an initial probability distribution toward a preferred distribution. The Ross characterization arises when the original distribution is riskier than the preferred distribution and the cost is monetary, and the Arrow-Pratt characterization arises when the original distribution differs from the preferred distribution by a simple mean-preserving spread and the cost is a utility cost. Higher-order increases in risk lead to higher-order generalizations, and the com- parative statics method yields a unified approach to the problem of comparative risk attitudes. In the second essay, we analyze decisions made by a group of terrorists and a government in a zero-sum game in which the terrorists minimize a representative citizen's expected utility and the government maximizes it. The terrorists' strategy balances the probability and the severity of the attack while the government chooses the level of investment reducing the probability and/or mitigating the severity. We find that if the representative citizen is risk neutral, the terrorists' response is not associated with the government's action and the representative citizen's risk attitudes affect the strategies of the government and the terrorists. Risk aversion always in- creases equilibrium severity but does not always increase equilibrium expenditure of the government. In the last essay, we consider a situation in which an individual has to pay for a good before he realizes the state-dependent surplus of the good. This ex-ante willingness to pay is called the option price and the difference between the option price and the expected surplus is the option value. We find that the option value actually is the buying price for a fixed payment of the expected surplus, and there is a special case in which the option value equals the negative of the compensating risk premium. We also find the effects on the option price and the option value when the expected utility assumption is replaced by a rank-dependent expected utility.
5

A study on user motive and willingness-to-pay of financial content website

Lin, Chih-feng 14 August 2001 (has links)
Owing to the NASDAQ crash, the development of internet advertisement is somewhat sluggish. The ICP owners have to to find a new model to servive; thus, they plan to gain cashflow from the users. The content of financial websites is relatively uniqe, so this study will focus on the user motive and willingness-to-pay of fincial content website. The study built up the dimensions of website content/services via website observation. And then it also uses the web-based questionnaire to understand the user motive and willingness-to-pay of financial content website. The findings are as fellowed: 1. There are three main motives for the usage of financial website. They are "infornation", "interaction", and "interesting/learning" motives. The most important motive is "information". 2. The users are most willing to pay for the "analyses/reports", "alert", and "full-text database seraching". 3. The user motive is relevent to the willingness- to-pay of financial content websites.Those who are of the "interaction" motive are the most willing to pay ones. 4. Age group, education background, and items of investment are three intervening varieces of the measurement of user motive and willingness-to-pay. 5. The findings would be useful for the planning of financial content website. It also keeps the records of current situiation of the existing financial content websites.
6

ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF ELICITING INDIVIDUAL WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR TRAVEL TIME SAVINGS: A PILOT STUDY

LASCELLES, ASHLEY 05 September 2008 (has links)
How does one estimate the value of an individual's time? One possible way is to estimate how much a person is willing to pay for time savings. The majority of transportation studies have used stated preference surveys to estimate an individual's willingness to pay (WTP) for travel time savings. However, stated preferences approaches are subject to hypothetical bias since they elicit WTP for hypothetical outcomes instead of real outcomes. One study used a revealed preference approach in a natural experiment to elicit WTP for travel time savings but the data was for a non-recurring event, which was not replicable. The purpose of this pilot study is to explore new methods, using procedures from a replicable field experiment, to elicit individual WTP for travel time savings. By using a revealed preference approach in an experimental setting, we address the legitimate concern over hypothetical bias while allowing the experimental methods and resulting data set to be replicated in other settings. The results show that the proposed field experiment is feasible, and that a sample of college students places a value of $22.43 on an hour of time. This estimated value is significantly greater than zero. We also find that individual WTP for travel time savings is significantly larger than the average wage rate, and that this WTP varies significantly across certain demographics. We conclude by reviewing the simplifying assumptions made within the study and offer extensions of how our data set can be replicated in the future for more complete analysis. / M.S. / Department of Economics / Business Administration / Economics MS
7

In Kind and Cash Payments in Experiments: Farmer Valuation of Seeds with Decreased Variance in Orissa, India

Hossack, Fiona I. Unknown Date
No description available.
8

Risk Perception and Willingness to Pay for Removing Arsenic in Drinking Water

Chen, Sihong 2011 August 1900 (has links)
This thesis is concerned with (i) how to estimate the perceived mortality risk, (ii) how to calculate the welfare change of mortality risk reduction and (iii) whether ambiguity aversion influences subjects' treatment decision. This study is an important topic in environmental and resource economics, and the attempt to introduce ambiguity preference into the models might shed light on future research in nonmarket valuation. In this study, I estimate the economic value of reducing mortality risk relating to arsenic in drinking water employing contingent valuation in U.S. arsenic hot spots. Re-cent studies have shown that perceived risk is a more reliable variable than scientific assessments of risk when applied to interpret and predict individual's averting behavior. I am also interested in the confidence level of perceived risk, which was elicited and treated as the degree of risk ambiguity in this paper. I develop a formal parametric model to calculate the mean willingness to pay (WTP) for mortality risk reduction, and find weak evidence of ambiguity aversion.
9

Willingness to pay as a predictor of viability for three different recreational pass variables

Neff, Jessica Ann. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--West Virginia University, 2006. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains viii, 104 p. : col. maps. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 83-88).
10

Valuing marine protected areas (MPAs) in Belize a case study using contingent valuation methodology (CVM) to determine tourists' willingness to pay (WTP) /

Trejo, José Edwardo. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Ohio University, June, 2005. / Title from PDF t.p. Includes bibliographical references (p. 52-55)

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