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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The Nadir of alliance The British ultimatum of 1890 and its place in Anglo-Portuguese relations, 1147- 1945 /

Winslett, Matthew. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.) -- University of Texas at Arlington, 2008.
12

The strategic partnership model for technology transfer : the Venezuelan telecommunications case

Parejo, Milady January 1998 (has links)
This thesis presents a study of technology transfer within the telecommunications company of Venezuela (CANTV) between 1991-1996. The thesis examines, in-depth, a single case - CANTV - at a critical time in its history. The company was state-owned until 1991 when it became a partnership with a US corporation, General Telephone Electronic (GTE) and Telefonica de Espana. The case is discussed against the background of global re-organisation of the telecommunications sector, its institutional transformation and technological change to provide an empirical foundation for a extensive study of technology transfer within the context of international alliances. It extends established theories which, hitherto, have not adequately described the role of partnerships as a conduit for the transfer of technologies. Until the early 1990s the performance of CANTV was far below international best practice. It was determined, at governmental level in Venezuela, to institute a radical transformation and profound changes took place in ownership, technology and, subsequently, performance. The case was analysed using a multi-disciplinary and longitudinal approach, drawing extensively on grounded theory. Data was gathered by participant observation, extensive interviews, study of company and governmental documentation. Frameworks for analysis were drawn from innovation theory, analyses of international technology transfer approaches and business management theory. In addition to an extensive organisational study, focusing on the relationships between partners, two specific technologies selected for examination as they were transferred into CANTV from partners. One technology was 'successfully transferred, the other not - this provided data for a detailed comparative analysis. The research concludes that a 'new' model of technology transfer has emerged within strategic partnerships and international alliances. However, to be successful, a portfolio of managerial capabilities is needed to reap the benefits of potential synergies between partners. Especially important are management skills and processes to define partners' capabilities, position technologies, manage complex transfer processes and support on-going learning.
13

Fighting Fires Together: Essays on Alliances among Fire Departments

Horwitz, Jay Robert 09 January 2012 (has links)
Organizations enter into strategic alliances for economic value that cannot be achieved by working alone. Despite the potential benefits many alliances fail to meet their goals, destroy value, and end in termination. Success within alliances is neither automatic nor assured. The ways that organizations arrange their alliances to contend with impediments to success is of great practical and theoretical importance. This thesis studies how formal and informal arrangements arise over time and influence the performance of U.S. fire departments. The first study empirically describes how formal contracting influences performance of the alliance and its members. I analyze a sample of responses by US fire departments to fires over 11 years, and I describe how contracting affects four dimensions of performance: arrival minutes, resolution minutes, property damage, and casualties. I find (i) the effect of contracts varies across qualitatively different outcomes, (ii) that contracts deliver separate costs and benefits at the level of the alliance and the organization, and (iii) that estimates are sensitive to matching on pre-contracting covariates including social context. The second study examines the role played by social context in contracting. Looking at the hazard of contracting between pairs of alliance partners I examine the effects of increased embeddedness in (i) focal relationships and in (ii) networks of outside relation- ships. I find that qualitative differences in prior interactions partly explain the decision to formally contract. I find that differences in arrangements with other partners affect formal contracting both directly and indirectly through interpretations of dyadic history. These findings suggest that models of relational mechanisms that accumulate within a relationship work both in parallel and interactively with broader social networks. The third study investigates how the design of alliances affects the performance of their members. I distinguish between (i) the extent to which departments rely on their own resources versus those of their alliance partners, (ii) the formality of arrangements, and (iii) performance in terms of property damage and casualties. I find that formal contracts are needed to improve some aspects of performance while informal arrangements are sufficient for others. This finding suggests a nuanced relationship among alliance structures and outcomes.
14

Fighting Fires Together: Essays on Alliances among Fire Departments

Horwitz, Jay Robert 09 January 2012 (has links)
Organizations enter into strategic alliances for economic value that cannot be achieved by working alone. Despite the potential benefits many alliances fail to meet their goals, destroy value, and end in termination. Success within alliances is neither automatic nor assured. The ways that organizations arrange their alliances to contend with impediments to success is of great practical and theoretical importance. This thesis studies how formal and informal arrangements arise over time and influence the performance of U.S. fire departments. The first study empirically describes how formal contracting influences performance of the alliance and its members. I analyze a sample of responses by US fire departments to fires over 11 years, and I describe how contracting affects four dimensions of performance: arrival minutes, resolution minutes, property damage, and casualties. I find (i) the effect of contracts varies across qualitatively different outcomes, (ii) that contracts deliver separate costs and benefits at the level of the alliance and the organization, and (iii) that estimates are sensitive to matching on pre-contracting covariates including social context. The second study examines the role played by social context in contracting. Looking at the hazard of contracting between pairs of alliance partners I examine the effects of increased embeddedness in (i) focal relationships and in (ii) networks of outside relation- ships. I find that qualitative differences in prior interactions partly explain the decision to formally contract. I find that differences in arrangements with other partners affect formal contracting both directly and indirectly through interpretations of dyadic history. These findings suggest that models of relational mechanisms that accumulate within a relationship work both in parallel and interactively with broader social networks. The third study investigates how the design of alliances affects the performance of their members. I distinguish between (i) the extent to which departments rely on their own resources versus those of their alliance partners, (ii) the formality of arrangements, and (iii) performance in terms of property damage and casualties. I find that formal contracts are needed to improve some aspects of performance while informal arrangements are sufficient for others. This finding suggests a nuanced relationship among alliance structures and outcomes.
15

Firm strategy and knowledge management in strategic supply chain relationships a knowledge-based view /

Gupta, Vishal K., January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2006. / The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on April 27, 2009) Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
16

Small allies, big challenges the international politics of military access /

Diehl, Christopher E. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Villanova University, 2009. / Political Science Dept. Includes bibliographical references.
17

Skyteam : a strategic alliance /

Pennington, Leon E. January 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.A.)--Indiana University, 2000. / Includes vita. Includes bibliographical references (p. 107-110). Also available via the Internet.
18

Alliance paradox an empirical study of alliance portfolio effects on customer service quality in the U.S. airline industry /

Zhang, Zhe. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Central Florida, 2009. / Advisers: Bruce Barringer, Robert Ford. Includes bibliographical references (p. 129-144).
19

U.S./Japan burdensharing constraints to increased Japanese contribution /

Braker, Patrick J. January 1990 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S. in Management)--Naval Postgraduate School, June 1990. / Thesis Advisor(s): Jones, Lawrence R. ; Terasawa, Katsuaki L. "June 1990." Description based on title screen as viewed on October 19, 2009. DTIC Descriptor(s): USSR, threats, perception (psychology), Japan, military budgets, defense systems, security DTIC Indicator(s): Joint military activities, economics, theses, United States, Japan, national defense, defense spending, burdensharing, military alliances, self defense forces Author(s) subject terms: Burdensharing, U.S/Japan alliance, economic theories of military alliance, U.S./Japan relations. Includes bibliographical references (p. 67-70). Also available in print.
20

Antecedents to effective collaboration to innovative /

Osman, Bedour. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--York University, 2004. Graduate Programme Schulich School of Business. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 124-130). Also available on the Internet. MODE OF ACCESS via web browser by entering the following URL: http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/yorku/fullcit?pNR11610

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