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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

An investigation of the determinants of private investment: the case of Botswana.

Lesotlho, Patrick January 2006 (has links)
<p>Private investment in Botswana as well as a ratio to Gross Domestic Product has been falling in some periods of 1976-2003. Viewed against the background of growing evidence of a link between investment and economic growth, an inconsistent and downward trend in Botswana's private investment is a matter of concern. Several studies in developing countries emphasize the importance of macroeconomic policy in explaining variations in investment, an in particular, identify the microeconomic determinants of private investment to include interest rates, output growth, public investment, bank credit to the private sector, inflation, real exchange rate, and the level of trade. This study evaluated the macroeconomic determinants of private investment in Botswana by means of a regression analysis based on the co-integration and Error Correction Model of Engle and Granger (1987).</p>
22

Rural community uplift in Botswana : two educational enterprises

Huggett, Hugh Henry 07 August 2015 (has links)
No description available.
23

The leadership challenge at Bank Alpha in Botswana

Morule, Komane Gerson January 2016 (has links)
A research report submitted to the Faculty of Law, Commerce and Management, University of the Witwatersrand, in 50% fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Management( in the field of Security) / Bank Alpha is one of the commercial banks operating in Botswana. Despite the generally favourable business environment, it was the only bank which experienced a gradually eroding capital base. This state had been prevailing for over five years since 2011. It led to the regulator intervening on two separate occasions to bring stability. The bank also suffered the highest staff turnover and disgruntled customers who faced stiff withdrawal limits. This study sought to investigate the leadership and governance challenges faced by the bank. It examined how they contributed to the current state and what could be done to mitigate the situation. The study used the contingency leadership theory following the balance score card (BSC) framework to investigate and analyse the events. The results point to the lack of business strategy and communication plan. These led to cross purpose departmental strategy and also a directive leadership approach. / GR2018
24

The effects of peer harrassment in a school curriculum : a case study of Botswana Junior Secondary schools / Merapelo Kate Mosenki

Mosenki, Merapelo Kate January 2006 (has links)
The opening chapter states the problem, purpose of study and also provides background to the problem as well as preliminary literature of the study. The other chapter that has substantially enriched the project is chapter two, which provided all the literature, related to the research. The third chapter explains the methodology used in this research study. Data was collected through the use of questionnaires from learners in Gaborone Junior Secondary Schools. All in all, a sample of sixty (60) (n=60) subjects were used to collect data. Chapter four is about data presentation, analysis and interpretation and lastly the recommendations, which are provided to help the authorities as well as the school administrators. The study sought to find out the causes and effects of peer harassment in Gaborone Junior Secondary Schools, as well as the prevalent forms of bullying and the effort undertaken by school administrators and other stakeholders to support victims of peer harassment in the educational system. The researchers' hypotheses were that home background, peer pressure, and popularity are some of the major causes of school bullying, physical and verbal abuse are the prevalent forms of bullying in secondary school, there is . a significant positive relationship between school bullying and learners' low academic achievement and that school administrators and teachers are not supportive to learners who are victims of peer harassment. The findings revealed that indeed, children who come from violent homes, homes faced with divorce, alcoholism, lack of maternal affection and poverty, become bullies. The other ,causes of bullying behaviour according to the study, is negative peer pressure as well as the desire to be popular. The study also revealed that learners who are victims of bullying academically perform poorly, fear going to school, riding a school bus and develop low self-esteem and are depressed. Furthermore, the study found that the school administration and teachers do not make an effort to attend to victims of peer harassment. The study recommends that the Ministry of Education through the work of curriculum developers should provide , policies and programs that address unacceptable behaviour. These polices can include expansion of the school curriculum to cater for guidance and counselling. During the study, the researcher's schedule was affected especially during administration of questionnaires as . a lot of schools were engaged in the Performance Management System exercise (P.M.S), thus some were reluctant to help. / (M.Ed.) North-West University, Mafikeng Campus, 2005
25

An investigation of the determinants of private investment: the case of Botswana.

Lesotlho, Patrick January 2006 (has links)
<p>Private investment in Botswana as well as a ratio to Gross Domestic Product has been falling in some periods of 1976-2003. Viewed against the background of growing evidence of a link between investment and economic growth, an inconsistent and downward trend in Botswana's private investment is a matter of concern. Several studies in developing countries emphasize the importance of macroeconomic policy in explaining variations in investment, an in particular, identify the microeconomic determinants of private investment to include interest rates, output growth, public investment, bank credit to the private sector, inflation, real exchange rate, and the level of trade. This study evaluated the macroeconomic determinants of private investment in Botswana by means of a regression analysis based on the co-integration and Error Correction Model of Engle and Granger (1987).</p>
26

Management accounting as an instrument for corporate governance in Botswana

Mayanja, Mohammed Kwanya 28 September 2011 (has links)
Problem statement: Management accounting is not given enough emphasis, at the board level, as a provider of timely and relevant information to facilitate the execution of good corporate governance. Without management accounting information corporations in Botswana may find it difficult to create sustainable corporate governance. Methodology:A questionnaire was used to investigate the use of management accounting tools by the directors in the target organisations.The researchwas carried out among listed companies on the stock exchange and the parastatal organisations in Botswana. Main findings: Most directors in the organisations don‟t emphasise the use of management accounting in decision making.Management accountants have also failed to provide theinformation at board level. Conclusion:To execute their duties efficiently, directorsmay need to call for more management accounting reports from the senior management level up to the board level and regularly use them to facilitate their decision making. / Management Accounting / M. Com. (Accounting)
27

The development assumptions of Botswana television : an assessment

Mmusi, Bishy January 2002 (has links)
This study researched a project to set up a national television service for Botswana to find out whether the service could be used for rural development generally, and in particular to assist the Ministry of Health to implement its health projects in the rural areas and including the fight against the AIDS disease. It reviews conceptions of development and also analyses various communication models that usefully inform the conceptualisation of a TV service that can contribute to development. The study was done by going through reports of feasibility studies on the project and through letters of official correspondence among officials of the Government of Botswana who debated the subject of whether or not the country should have a national TV service. The reports and correspondence were supplemented with interviews of key people involved in the implementation of the project, as well as interviews of officials of the Ministry of Health. The findings of the study are that the Botswana television service project started and ended on a footing that forgot about television, a medium that is dependent on professional and organisational capacity and purpose, and as a result the project did not take-off. A qualitative method was used as the study required in-depth interviews during which new issues kept on emerging and nothing could be pre-determined because the study took place as the project was being implemented. The study was completed in June 2000, at a point where the project should have been completed but it was discovered that the station could not go on air as a television service had not been conceptualised and there was no management structure in place and the Government of Botswana appealed to the British Government for the staff of the British Broadcasting Corporation to come quickly to Botswana to rescue the project and put it on track, supposedly. The study has concluded that the Botswana television service project became stillborn because there was a lack of professional and intellectual capacity to conceptualise the service, and instead there had been too much concentration on the construction of the TV building and acquisition of equipment.
28

An investigation of the determinants of private investment: the case of Botswana

Lesotlho, Patrick January 2006 (has links)
Magister Economicae - MEcon / Private investment in Botswana as well as a ratio to Gross Domestic Product has been falling in some periods of 1976-2003. Viewed against the background of growing evidence of a link between investment and economic growth, an inconsistent and downward trend in Botswana's private investment is a matter of concern. Several studies in developing countries emphasize the importance of macroeconomic policy in explaining variations in investment, an in particular, identify the microeconomic determinants of private investment to include interest rates, output growth, public investment, bank credit to the private sector, inflation, real exchange rate, and the level of trade. This study evaluated the macroeconomic determinants of private investment in Botswana by means of a regression analysis based on the co-integration and Error Correction Model of Engle and Granger (1987). / South Africa
29

Child justice: an analysis of the development of child justice reform in Botswana

Isaacs, Nthabiseng Rosalind Bertha January 2014 (has links)
This dissertation addresses the developments of child justice in Botswana. The first ever child justice that was established is discussed with the aim to understand the influence it had on Botswana with regard to the nature of the proceedings and the founding principles of child justice and its application in the courts. International Conventions that have a bearing on the rights of children in Botswana, such as the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Administration of Juvenile Justice, the United Nations Rules for the Protection of Juveniles Deprived of their Liberty, the United Nations Guidelines for the Prevention of Juvenile Delinquency and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child are discussed. The measures that are currently in place for the protection of children who are in conflict with the law are examined with particular emphasis on those children that are arrested and detained. A comparison is drawn between the Children’s Act CAP [28:04] OF 1981, the Children’s Act 8 of 2009 and the South African Child Justice Act 75 of 2008 and the differences between the systems are highlighted. The provisions of the 2009 Act pertaining to children in conflict with the law are discussed in depth and shortfalls of the 2009 Children’s Act are identified. Diversion, as a form of correctional action, is discussed in light of international conventions. The provisions regarding the diversion of child offenders in the Child Justice Act are interrogated. Trial procedures under the 2009 Children’s Act are discussed and compared to those in South Africa including measures in place for the sentencing child offenders in both Botswana and South Africa. After an analysis of the international conventions, legislation and case law, the conclusion is reached that there is a commitment in Botswana towards the protectionand realization of children’s rights especially those who are in conflict with the law. It is recommended in the conclusions that Botswana import some provisions of the Child Justice Act into domestic legislation in order to comprehensively address the plight of children in trouble with the law so as to strive towards maximum compliance with conventions that Botswana has signed.
30

Survival analysis of SMMEs in Botswana

Mannathoko, Bame Joshua January 2011 (has links)
This study investigates the factors influencing survival of micro enterprises funded by the Department of Youth in Botswana. Data drawn from 271 business ventures established between the years 2005 and 2009 was analysed by using the Cox proportional hazards model (CPHM), a survival analysis technique. Results from the analysis suggest that businesses operated by younger owners endure a higher risk of failure in comparison to businesses owned by older entrepreneurs while firm size at start-up was also a significant determinant of survival. As a component of human capital, a personal contribution to the start-up capital and prior employment experience were also found to be significant predictors of business survival. Regarding gender of the business owner, the claim that female operated businesses face a higher probability of failure when compared to businesses run by males was not supported by the study results. The amount of funding from the DOY at start-up was found not to have any influence on the survival or failure outcomes for the business projects. Based on these findings, certain policy implications can be deduced. This study recommends that policy makers focus more on human capital requirements of beneficiaries of government business development initiatives as well as entrepreneur contribution to start-up capital in order to increase the success rate of the business ventures. In addition, the capacity to perform continuous monitoring and mentoring of government funded businesses ventures, particularly SMMEs, should be increased within the relevant departments or alternatively outsourcing of the requisite skills should be considered. Lastly, recommendation to replicate this research, at a larger scale in future is proposed.

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