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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Effects of Perceived Quality, Product Category Similarity, and Brand Breadth on Consumers' Perceptions of Brand Extensions: Tests of Categorization Theory and Cognitive Response Theory

Lee, Dongdae 08 1900 (has links)
Various constructs are related to predicting consumers' perceptions of brand extensions. Among these, three constructs, perceptions of perceived quality (PQ) associated with the parent brand, product category similarity (PCS) of an extension to its parent brand, and brand breadth (BB) of the parent, are central to many brand extension studies. The purpose of this study is to clarify the roles of these three constructs and to pit predictions from an alternative theoretical perspective — cognitive response theory — against predictions based on categorization theory.
22

Consumer evaluations of brand imitations: an investigation

Su, Sasa Unknown Date (has links)
Brand imitation is viewed as an infringement of the imitated original brand. (Zaichkowsky, 1995). Although brand managers and researchers have looked into ways to fight against imitations, these are still prevalent in today's market. Researchers have found that one of the major reasons for the growing volume of imitations has been consumer demand. Thus, rather than studying ways to reduce imitations, it is first important for brand managers and researchers to understand why consumers would knowingly buy imitations. The major issue is to understand how consumers evaluate brand imitations. Several studies have explored factors that might have an influence on consumer evaluations of brand imitations. However these findings are limited. For example, similarity of the imitation to the original brand is an important factor in consumer evaluations. However, very little research has studied this aspect. Thus, this research is motivated to further investigate the influential factors of consumer evaluations of brand imitations. This study replicates d'Astous and Gargouri (2001), a study that examines a comprehensive set of factors that might influence consumer evaluations of brand imitations. The purpose of this study is to re-examine their hypotheses in various product categories, with a focus on luxury brands. Moreover, this study has extended the d'Astous and Gargouri (2001) study by investigating product similarity which had not been previously explored. However, hypothesis testing did not completely support the hypothesized effects. The results indicate that consumers who purchase luxury brand imitations are heavily influenced by the price and store image. The results show also that the factor of product similarity is unimportant to a customer purchasing imitator brands.
23

Product quality, image, and salient association levels as factors in brand extendibility /

Kim, Woo Sung. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Oregon, 2001. / Typescript. Includes vita and abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 155-163). Also available for download via the World Wide Web; free to University of Oregon users.
24

Exploration of brand equity measures : linking customer mind-set measure to product-market performance measure

Huang, Rong, 1973- January 2008 (has links)
Motivation: Various brand equity measures have been proposed in extant literature. Few researches have explored the theoretical similarities, differences and relationship between different brand equity measures. In the thesis, I will explore two types of brand equity measures, namely customer mind-set measures and product-market performance measures. In particular, I will look at: 1) the correlation between the two types of measures; 2) which measure reflects the underlying brand equity construct better; 3) the impacts of marketing mix elements on the two types measures respectively; and 4) the prediction relationship between customer mind-set measure and product-market performance measure. / Theoretical Framework: My main theoretical framework will be brand equity literature. I draw upon the Brand Value Chain framework (Keller & Lehmann, 2(03) to explore the conceptual differences between two types of brand equity measurements, namely customer mind-set and product-market performance measurements. Furthermore, I also use Keller's (1993) Customer-Based Brand Equity concept to explore how specific marketing activities impact the brand equity theoretically. / Data and Methodology: This thesis measures brand equity by two methods: customer mind-set (Keller, 1993) and revenue premium (Ailawadi, Lehmann, & Neslin, 2(03). I use two types of data in the empirical analyses. Survey data, procured from a consumer-packaged product company 1, is used to measure customer mind-set brand equity. This unique data consists of proprietary equity scan surveys on 11 brands from 2004 -- 2006 in the United States. The measurement model of brand equity is rooted in Keller's customer-based brand equity concept (1993). The measurements include brand awareness, brand performance, brand image, brand judgment, brand feelings and brand resonance (Keller, 2(01). The second data is from commercial sources, including IRI and TNS, for the specific brands and time periods corresponding to the survey data and includes revenue premium, price, sales, distribution, promotion, and advertising information. Various techniques are employed for analyses including descriptive and reliability analyses, correlation analyses, multiple-regression, and cross-validation. / Contribution: The contribution ofthis thesis is threefold. Firstly, it sheds light on the underlying theory and relationship between two types of brand equity measurements and provides empirical test of the theory. Secondly, it provides a systematic exploration of the impact of marketing mix elements on brand equity using real market data and two different measurements. Third, it offers very practical guidance for managers on how to choose a specific brand equity measures and how to track the brand equity measures over time for their brands. / 1Because a confidential agreement with this company, the company name, brands name as well as product category will be disguised in the thesis.
25

Estimation of heterogeneity in brand choice models /

Chickamenahalli, Suma Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MStatistics)--University of South Australia, 2000
26

Conceptualising and measuring brand accessibility /

Romaniuk, Jenni. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MBus)--University of South Australia, 1997
27

Brand awareness effects on consumer decision making for a common, repeat purchase product :

Macdonald, Emma Kate. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (M.Bus.)--University of South Australia, 1996.
28

A comparison of behavioural and demographic variables used in consumer research /

Cierpicki, Steven. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MBus) -- University of South Australia, 1998
29

Evaluating the impact of a loyalty program on brand loyalty : can loyalty programs produce deviations from established 'Dirichlet' patterns of repeat-purchase? / Byron Malcolm Sharp.

Sharp, Byron Malcolm January 1999 (has links)
Bibliography: leaves 134-145 and 157-158. / 158 leaves ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Evaluates an intervention in the marketplace. Examines the impact of a loyalty program on brand loyalty in a series of seven studies/replications across two countries and five product categories. Supports the use of Dirichlet norms to assess the impact of marketplace interventions, or at least loyalty initiatives. The comparisons against Dirichlet predictions seemed to work as expected in being able to show the impact, or lack of impact, of these marketing interventions. Provides a methodological and analytical framework for further studies of this kind. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Graduate School of Management, 2000?
30

Evaluating the impact of a loyalty program on brand loyalty : can loyalty programs produce deviations from established 'Dirichlet' patterns of repeat-purchase? / Byron Malcolm Sharp.

Sharp, Byron Malcolm January 1999 (has links)
Bibliography: leaves 134-145 and 157-158. / 158 leaves ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Evaluates an intervention in the marketplace. Examines the impact of a loyalty program on brand loyalty in a series of seven studies/replications across two countries and five product categories. Supports the use of Dirichlet norms to assess the impact of marketplace interventions, or at least loyalty initiatives. The comparisons against Dirichlet predictions seemed to work as expected in being able to show the impact, or lack of impact, of these marketing interventions. Provides a methodological and analytical framework for further studies of this kind. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Graduate School of Management, 2000?

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