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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
51

"The role of brands in the advertising of beauty products."

Cebisa, Zwelakhe Erick. January 2007 (has links)
This research investigates the role of brands in the advertising of beauty products. This study was conducted at tertiary institutions in the Durban Metropolitan Area. Since, students are believed to constitute a large market for consumer goods, especially beauty products, the study also seeks to determine consumption patterns and preferences of brands of beauty products by students at tertiary institutions. Using a survey-based study, the results of the survey highlights the importance of the branding of beauty products in promoting sales, loyalty and preference for various brands. The findings suggest that marketers' should continue to provide information to consumers about their beauty products, so that their benefits and functions are constantly emphasized, without exaggerating the claims of the brands. It has also emerged that detailed instructions on the use of beauty products and the frequency of their use be clearly indicated on their labels. This study has also revealed that brands of beauty products entrench the image of the company through its truthful advertising. / Thesis (M.Com.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2007.
52

Understanding consumers' repertoire sizes /

Banelis, Melissa. Unknown Date (has links)
The aim of this thesis is to develop a greater understanding of consumers' brand repertoires. This research is part of the brand choice literature, which involves the analysis of all parts of the brand choice process. While there is clearly a need for research on the size of consumers' repertoites, little research has been conducted on this topic to date. This thesis provides much needed descriptive knowledge in relation to repertoire size, as well as providing information about the potential influence of a selection of consumer characteristics on this measure. / Repertoire size is defined as the number of brands a consumer purchases over a specified period of time. It is not only seen as a measure of loyalty (the smaller the repertoire, the higher the loyalty), but also a measure of competitiveness in a market (the bigger the repertoire, the greater the competition). Although these areas are of considerable interest to marketing managers and researchers alike, this measure has rarely been emphasised in previous research (Colombo and Jiang 2002). / Thesis (BA(Hons)IndustrialandAppliedMaths)--University of South Australia, 2008.
53

A study of the effects of brand image on consumer behaviour and brand equity /

Boon, Eddie Phun Foo Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2004.
54

The added benefit brand image provides to customers :

Sharp, Byron M. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MBus) -- University of South Australia, 1991
55

A study of the effects of brand image on consumer behaviour and brand equity /

Boon, Eddie Phun Foo Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2004.
56

The role of consumer knowledge in consumer evaluations of brand extension

Ma, Yun Unknown Date (has links)
This study examines the effects of two types of consumer knowledge, product and brand knowledge, on consumer fit perceptions between an extension and its parent brand, so as to further investigate the role of consumer knowledge in brand extension evaluations. Based on the reviewed literature four hypotheses were proposed. The first two hypotheses predicted that both product and brand knowledge has an impact of consumer perceived fit between an extension and its parent brand. The other two hypotheses proposed that product knowledge affect more on the fit perceptions between a functional brand and its extension, while brand knowledge affect more on the fit perceptions between a prestige brand and its extension. An experiment was performed to examine these hypothesized relationships. Two hypotheses related to brand knowledge are supported, while the other two hypotheses related to product knowledge are not supported statistically. The results reveal that product and brand knowledge have different effects on consumer fit perceptions between an extension and its parent brand in terms of different brand types, functional vs. prestige brand. The experimental findings demonstrate that brand knowledge has an impact on consumer fit perceptions between an extension and its parent brand, and its effect dominant in prestige brand extension evaluations.
57

Understanding consumers' repertoire sizes

Banelis, Melissa January 2008 (has links)
The aim of this thesis is to develop a greater understanding of consumers' brand repertoires. This research is part of the brand choice literature, which involves the analysis of all parts of the brand choice process. While there is clearly a need for research on the size of consumers' repertoites, little research has been conducted on this topic to date. This thesis provides much needed descriptive knowledge in relation to repertoire size, as well as providing information about the potential influence of a selection of consumer characteristics on this measure.
58

Heterogeneity in brand choice

Rungie, Campbell Maxton January 2000 (has links)
The Dirichlet Model has been fitted to purchase behaviour in many product categories. The model uses the Dirichlet multinomial distributions to account for heterogeneity between customers in brand choice. The research reported here applies the concept of heterogeneity, developed in the Dirichlet Model, to other areas in marketing. It works through a range of classic market research techniques showing the changes and improvements that result from the consideration of heterogeneity in brand choice. The analysis has implications for (1) sample size calculations (2) the estimation of variance and reliability for nominal variables, (3) the evaluation of logistic and multinomial logit models, (4) the method and design of research which uses discrete choice models, (5) the evaluation of the similarities and differences between product categories and (6) the analysis and measurement of purchase feedback effects. The work also examines methods for identifying if a set of data conforms to the Dirichlet distribution. The work develops a concept of heterogeneity for a nominal variable, which was always known but the implications not fully understood. Discrete choice is a random Bernoulli trial based on a probability. The thesis embodied in the work presented here is that: across the population there is not a single probability, but a probability variable. The probability distribution of this variable is known as the mixing distribution. Analysis should focus on the attributes of this probability variable, and in particular its heterogeneity, rather than on the specific discrete brand choice. If all choice is based on the one, single underlying probability then there is no heterogeneity in the probabilities; there is no mixing distribution. If there is no heterogeneity in the probabilities then an analysis of the discrete choice is an analysis of random data evolving from repeated Bernoulli trials. The Dirichlet and Dirichlet multinomial distributions provide a strong framework for the analysis of the probability variable. / thesis (PhDBusinessandManagement)--University of South Australia, 2000.
59

The impact of numeric sub-branding on Singaporean Chinese consumers : a conjoint analysis /

Tan, Donald. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (D.B.A.)--University of Western Australia, 2006.
60

Brands we love to hate : an exploration of brand avoidance /

Lee, Michael Shyue Wai. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (PhD--Chemistry)--University of Auckland, 2007. / "A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Auckland, 2007". Includes bibliographical references (leaves 242-262)

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