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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Exploration of brand equity measures : linking customer mind-set measure to product-market performance measure

Huang, Rong, 1973- January 2008 (has links)
Motivation: Various brand equity measures have been proposed in extant literature. Few researches have explored the theoretical similarities, differences and relationship between different brand equity measures. In the thesis, I will explore two types of brand equity measures, namely customer mind-set measures and product-market performance measures. In particular, I will look at: 1) the correlation between the two types of measures; 2) which measure reflects the underlying brand equity construct better; 3) the impacts of marketing mix elements on the two types measures respectively; and 4) the prediction relationship between customer mind-set measure and product-market performance measure. / Theoretical Framework: My main theoretical framework will be brand equity literature. I draw upon the Brand Value Chain framework (Keller & Lehmann, 2(03) to explore the conceptual differences between two types of brand equity measurements, namely customer mind-set and product-market performance measurements. Furthermore, I also use Keller's (1993) Customer-Based Brand Equity concept to explore how specific marketing activities impact the brand equity theoretically. / Data and Methodology: This thesis measures brand equity by two methods: customer mind-set (Keller, 1993) and revenue premium (Ailawadi, Lehmann, & Neslin, 2(03). I use two types of data in the empirical analyses. Survey data, procured from a consumer-packaged product company 1, is used to measure customer mind-set brand equity. This unique data consists of proprietary equity scan surveys on 11 brands from 2004 -- 2006 in the United States. The measurement model of brand equity is rooted in Keller's customer-based brand equity concept (1993). The measurements include brand awareness, brand performance, brand image, brand judgment, brand feelings and brand resonance (Keller, 2(01). The second data is from commercial sources, including IRI and TNS, for the specific brands and time periods corresponding to the survey data and includes revenue premium, price, sales, distribution, promotion, and advertising information. Various techniques are employed for analyses including descriptive and reliability analyses, correlation analyses, multiple-regression, and cross-validation. / Contribution: The contribution ofthis thesis is threefold. Firstly, it sheds light on the underlying theory and relationship between two types of brand equity measurements and provides empirical test of the theory. Secondly, it provides a systematic exploration of the impact of marketing mix elements on brand equity using real market data and two different measurements. Third, it offers very practical guidance for managers on how to choose a specific brand equity measures and how to track the brand equity measures over time for their brands. / 1Because a confidential agreement with this company, the company name, brands name as well as product category will be disguised in the thesis.
2

Branding and territories : the conflict of applying domestic laws to universal trademarks

Le Péru, Alexandre January 2004 (has links)
The thesis focuses on the branding phenomenon in its relationship with territory. Owners of global brands seek to defend a set of positive associations that goes beyond the concept of trademark per se. In that undertaking, the territorial limitation of trademark rights is perceived as an impediment to a worldwide protection of the branded myth. / The thesis analyses the branding phenomenon and the territoriality principle of trademark law. It also depicts the methods currently employed by trademark owners to circumvent national legislations. The thesis supports alternative approaches, which successfully combine branding and territorial values. / Eventually, the conflict of applying domestic law to "universal" trademarks can be solved by an adequate use of the global branding notion and through the establishment or strengthening of relevant regional blocks.
3

Branding and territories : the conflict of applying domestic laws to universal trademarks

Le Péru, Alexandre January 2004 (has links)
No description available.
4

Exploration of brand equity measures : linking customer mind-set measure to product-market performance measure

Huang, Rong, 1973- January 2008 (has links)
No description available.
5

Living the Brand : a case study of how management at Standard Bank can create brand ambassadors of their employees.

Bomela, Chubekile Cola. January 2006 (has links)
In April 2006 the new brand positioning for Standard Bank was revealed to staff and the general public. The new brand positioning focused mainly on employees and customers and to a lesser extent operational efficiency. The study attempts to find what meanings the employees of Standard Bank made of this new brand positioning through a qualitative case study methodology. As part of the study, theoretical models and concepts covering the brand, brand positioning, living the brand, employee segmentation and the 3-phased approach to implement the programme were reviewed. A qualitative research study was conducted whereby one-on-one interviews were held with managerial and non-managerial employees at Standard Bank. The research is therefore a phenomenological investigation of the business problem statement, that is, the re-positioning of the brand from simpler to better, faster as well as inspired and motivated. The research findings were that the brand repositioning did not have a negative impact on employee perceptions. However, it was found that employees did not understand what the brand stands for and were having problems delivering on the new brand promise. To improve the level of understanding by the employees so that the new brand positioning can influence employee behaviour, the researcher recommended applying the 3- phased approach in implementing an effective "living the brand" programme. / Thesis (MBA)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2006.
6

The branding role that product labelling plays within integrated marketing communication

Hasert, Rudolf Karl 25 January 2012 (has links)
M.A. / This study focuses on empirically determining the branding role that product labelling plays as a strategic element in Integrated Marketing Communication functioning within the food and beverage industry. This research topic was selected for a number of reasons. Firstly, there is a general misconception of the definition of the term Integrated Marketing Communication. Secondly, there is also an emergence of the perception that labelling plays an important role as a strategic element in Integrated Marketing Communication functioning. Thirdly, there is also speculation regarding what this actual role is, that labelling plays within the Integrated Marketing Communication functioning. Fourthly, on closer investigation, it becomes evident that although there is a degree of literaturebased evidence that identifies the role that product labelling plays (within Integrated Marketing Communication), as that of branding, there is no empirical research to substantiate these claims. For these combined reasons there is a direct need for research into these issues. To facilitate the effective fulfilment of the research goals, there was a thorough examination of the theoretical literature available and the completion of an empirical study. Furthermore it was found that the examination of the branding role that product labelling plays as a strategic element in Integrated Marketing Communication functioning would be attainable if the research goal was restricted to a manageable field. To satisfy this aim, the study was focused on the food and beverage industry. The key terms of branding as well as Integrated Marketing Communication were investigated and defined. From the literature available, the branding role that product labelling plays as a strategic element in Integrated Marketing Communication functioning was examined and also defined. From this context it was found that ample evidence was available to conduct empirical research into this area. It became clear that the identification of the branding role that product labelling plays as a strategic element in Integrated Marketing Communication functioning within the food and beverage industry would rest upon the identification of the transmission of functional and non-functional attributes, consequences and values to consumers via verbal and visual images. The method best suited to identifying the transmission of these values was shown to be that of qualitative research. The proof of the transmission of these functions within the sample formed the focus of the empirical study. Ultimately this proof would illustrate the branding role of labelling. Within the context of the qualitative research, it was shown that the most appropriate approach to identify the transmission of functionality was through the use of the Means-end theory utilising the laddering technique. Within the context of the research document through the laddering technique, it also became apparent that there is a clear role that product labelling plays as a strategic element in Integrated Marketing Communication functioning within the food and beverage industry. It is also evident through literature-based and empirical evidence that this role is one ofbranding.
7

Investigating the determinants of brand equity: a verification approach in the detergents industry in South Africa

Saal, Alvin 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MBA)--Stellenbosch University, 2018. / ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Creating brand equity, that is, building a strong brand is a successful strategy for differentiating a product from competing brands (Aaker, 1991: 256). Brand equity provides sustainable competitive advantages, because it creates meaningful competitive barriers. Brand equity is developed through perceived quality, brand loyalty, brand awareness and brand associations, which cannot be either built or destroyed in the short run; but can be created only in the long run through carefully designed marketing investment. This study aims to examine the practicality and application of a customer-based brand equity model, based on Aaker’s (1991: 256) well-known conceptual framework of brand equity. The study investigates the causal relationships between the 4 dimensions of brand equity and brand equity itself. It specifically measured the way in which consumers’ perceptions of the dimensions of brand equity affected the overall brand equity evaluations. Data were collected from a sample of house-wives in South Africa. The study concludes that brand loyalty and perceived quality is the most influential dimension of brand equity. Support was also found for the brand awareness and brand association dimensions. Implications for marketing managers and marketing planners are discussed. / AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die skep van handelsmerkekwiteit “brand equity”, wat die bou van sterk handelsmerke impliseer, is 'n suksesvolle strategie om 'n produk van mededingende produkte te onderskei (Aaker, 1991: 256). Handelsmerkekwiteit voorsien volgehoue mededingende voordele omrede dit betekenisvolle mededingende hindernisse skep. Dit is ontwikkel op grond van kwaliteitsherkenning, handlesmerklojaliteit, kwaliteitsbewustheid en kwaliteitsassosiasies. Handelsmerkekwiteit kan geskep word deur omsigtige bemarkingsinvestering. Die doelwit van hierdie studie was om die toepaslikheid en praktiese toepassing van 'n kliëntgebasseerde ekwiteitsmodel te ondersoek en is gebaseer op Aaker (1991: 256) se bekende konseptuele handelsmerk-ekwiteitsraamwerk. Die studie ondersoek die kousale verwantskap tussen die vier handelsmerkekwiteitsdimensies en die algehele ekwiteitsevaluasie. Dit meet die wyse waarop die verbruiker se persepsie van die dimensies ekwiteit beïnvloed en die algehele ekwiteitsevaluasie. Data-insameling is gedoen onder huisvrouens in Suid-Afrika. Die resultate bevestig dat handelsmerklojaliteitlojaliteit en kwaliteitherkenning die mees invloedryke dimensies van handelsmerekwiteit is. Ondersteuning is ook gevind vir die kwaliteitsbewustheid en assosiasie dimensies. Hiervolgens is implikasies vir bemarkingbestuurders en -beplanners geformuleer.
8

The exploitation of niche markets : an evaluation of Huisgenoot's standalone titles in an already competitive consumer magazine market

Coetzee, Nerisa 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MBA)--Stellenbosch University, 2013. / The high costs of new product launches have forced consumer magazines globally to launch brand extensions as part of new product strategies. Costs can be reduced radically by using renowned brands and utilising their marketing and distribution competencies. The economic recession and a rapid leaning towards non-print media have caused a sharp drop in advertising as well as consumer spending in the print magazine industry. Nevertheless, tablet devices and ground-breaking technology offers opportunities for traditional media to grow. The product life cycle and the growth-share matrix for a mature brand such as Huisgenoot validate the necessity of new products and brand extensions to remain sustainable. Huisgenoot is the largest magazine in South Africa with a circulation of 281 045, reaching 2.2 million (AMPS 2012, Jul 2011 – Jun 2012) readers on a weekly basis. Publishers felt it necessary to develop a brand extension strategy to leverage the brand even further and to avoid stagnation of the title. However, although profiting from parent brand value sounds promising, the global failure rate of extensions is still great. Extending existing brands and launching new products is crucial to increase profits. Brand extensions address neglected consumer needs and simultaneously confront competition in the market. However, launching new products is costly, risky and time consuming. In 2010, Media24 decided to leverage content, one of its most valuable assets, by introducing additional standalone magazines (line extensions) for one of its strongest brands, Huisgenoot. Are magazines exploiting niche markets catering for the changing needs of the South African consumer and advertiser? What is the impact of Huisgenoot’s standalone titles on the business of Media24 Weekly Magazines in an already competitive consumer magazine market? This research report explores specifically Huisgenoot’s line extensions in order to evaluate if an extension strategy has long-term sustainability for the title or if it is inducing a cannibalisation effect on the core magazine brand. Growth of the extensions will be measured by analysing profit, circulation and point of sale data. A critical analysis of the current extension strategy will also be completed. The report also includes an overview of the South African media landscape, identifies the core brand (parent brand) values of Huisgenoot and includes interviews with important role-players within the publishing business. This was done by conducting a literature overview, completing a reader questionnaire and doing in-depth interviews. The qualitative data was supported by secondary circulation and advertising data. The researcher concludes by making recommendations to ensure sustainability in terms of Huisgenoot’s future line extensions.
9

Investigating the determinants of brand equity: a verification approach in the detergents industry in South Africa

Saal, Alvin 03 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MBA)--Stellenbosch University, 2018. / ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Creating brand equity, that is, building a strong brand is a successful strategy for differentiating a product from competing brands (Aaker, 1991: 256). Brand equity provides sustainable competitive advantages, because it creates meaningful competitive barriers. Brand equity is developed through perceived quality, brand loyalty, brand awareness and brand associations, which cannot be either built or destroyed in the short run; but can be created only in the long run through carefully designed marketing investment. This study aims to examine the practicality and application of a customer-based brand equity model, based on Aaker’s (1991: 256) well-known conceptual framework of brand equity. The study investigates the causal relationships between the 4 dimensions of brand equity and brand equity itself. It specifically measured the way in which consumers’ perceptions of the dimensions of brand equity affected the overall brand equity evaluations. Data were collected from a sample of house-wives in South Africa. The study concludes that brand loyalty and perceived quality is the most influential dimension of brand equity. Support was also found for the brand awareness and brand association dimensions. Implications for marketing managers and marketing planners are discussed. / AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die skep van handelsmerkekwiteit “brand equity”, wat die bou van sterk handelsmerke impliseer, is 'n suksesvolle strategie om 'n produk van mededingende produkte te onderskei (Aaker, 1991: 256). Handelsmerkekwiteit voorsien volgehoue mededingende voordele omrede dit betekenisvolle mededingende hindernisse skep. Dit is ontwikkel op grond van kwaliteitsherkenning, handlesmerklojaliteit, kwaliteitsbewustheid en kwaliteitsassosiasies. Handelsmerkekwiteit kan geskep word deur omsigtige bemarkingsinvestering. Die doelwit van hierdie studie was om die toepaslikheid en praktiese toepassing van 'n kliëntgebasseerde ekwiteitsmodel te ondersoek en is gebaseer op Aaker (1991: 256) se bekende konseptuele handelsmerk-ekwiteitsraamwerk. Die studie ondersoek die kousale verwantskap tussen die vier handelsmerkekwiteitsdimensies en die algehele ekwiteitsevaluasie. Dit meet die wyse waarop die verbruiker se persepsie van die dimensies ekwiteit beïnvloed en die algehele ekwiteitsevaluasie. Data-insameling is gedoen onder huisvrouens in Suid-Afrika. Die resultate bevestig dat handelsmerklojaliteitlojaliteit en kwaliteitherkenning die mees invloedryke dimensies van handelsmerekwiteit is. Ondersteuning is ook gevind vir die kwaliteitsbewustheid en assosiasie dimensies. Hiervolgens is implikasies vir bemarkingbestuurders en -beplanners geformuleer.
10

The influence of selected branding variables on corporate reputation

Potgieter, Adéle January 1900 (has links)
Despite research on relationships between branding constructs such as corporate identity, corporate image, employer branding, corporate branding and corporate reputation over the past years, limited research has been conducted on the influence of employees on these constructs. Although the concept of personal branding has been debated by many, there is a dearth of research on personal branding and the relationship between personal branding and employer branding, corporate branding and corporate reputation. As a result, this study was carried out in order to explore the influence of employer branding, employee’s personal branding and corporate branding on corporate reputation. It is argued in this study that corporate reputation is one of the most valuable intangible assets of an organisation. Organisations need to ensure that they comprehend the elements in the establishment of a corporate identity and a corporate image, and how employees influence these constructs. It became clear that an individual’s associations, awareness and assessment of an organisation influence their direct and indirect experiences with an organisation resulting in the formulation of a corporate reputation. The study also emphasised that employees are one of the most important tangible assets of an organisation and play an important role in establishing a corporate reputation and corporate brand. It was stated that an organisation combines a set of organisational qualities that focus on streamlining priorities, escalate productivity and improve recruitment, commitment and retention of employees through the process of employer branding. The study revealed that potential employees use the organisational attractiveness as an essential decision making tool in their quest to find the perfect employer. During the employer branding process prospective employees compare their own needs, values and personalities to that of the employer brand of the organisation. It is suggested that a well-executed employee branding process alleviates the profile of the organisation internally as well as externally, enhancing the competitive advantage of, and ultimately the corporate brand and reputation of an organisation. The study revealed that the emotional connections that stakeholders make with employees are moulded through formal and informal interactions with customers. Throughout the study it became evident that the individual provides a ‘package’ of their own values and qualities (what they believe in) expressed by what they do and how they do it, in order to create their own unique selling proposition in the market place through personal branding. It is, therefore, imperative that organisations find the correct person-organisation fit. The study indicated that the establishment of a personal brand is important for the employee but equally important for the organisation that becomes the employer. This highlighted the fact that any misalignment between the employee’s brand package content and the organisation’s brand values, objectives and personality results in the employee behaving differently to the expectations of the organisation. In order to establish the relationships between the variables of the study, empirical research was conducted. The study employed an exploratory as well as a causal approach. The Top500 best managed companies in South Africa was used as the sample population of the study. Companies were selected from the Top500 list and was guided by the sectors they have been assigned to. Eight industries were chosen that broadly constitute the most important sectors in the South African context. All five companies within the following sectors were selected: Arts/entertainment/recreation; Finance and Insurance; Banking sector; Government and Public administration; Hotel and Food services; Manufacturing and Retail. A self-administered web-based survey, consisting of five sections was utilised as measuring instrument. The questions in sections one to four related to the variables of the study whilst Section five was used to collect the demographic data of the respondents. A total of 312 usable questionnaires were received from a possible 900 respondents, indicating a 35 percent response rate.

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