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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The emergence of cermaic art education in the Midwest nineteenth and early twentieth century historic and socio-economic developments /

Belling, Katherine M. January 1984 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1984. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 83-95).
2

Pottery craft and culture

Randell, Gillian January 1972 (has links)
"The idea and fact of containment have been the primary significance of pottery from the beginning, and pots of all ages and peoples, even when their ostensible function was ceremonial or symbolical, have expressed by their generous swelling volumes, the potential or holding things of vital importance to man food, liquid or the furnishings of the grave." The utilitarian value of a pot is inseparable from its aesthetic quality. "There can be no fullness of complete realization or utility without beauty, refinement and charm, for the simple reason that their absence must in the long run be intolerable to both maker and consumer... The continued production of utilities without delight in making and using is bound to produce only boredom and to end in sterility." Modern pottery, whether industrial or that of the artist potter, has each in its different way tended to separate the aesthetic and the utilitarian. This is one symptom of the cultural decline of our Western tradition since the Eighteenth Century. The making of pots has persisted from earliest times to the present day through our ever changing world. Circumstances have at times obscured the essential truths of this art.
3

The (extra)ordinary (con)texts of beauty and be-ing

Kruger, R 01 January 2009 (has links)
Summary This article aims to interrogate Japanese theorist Sōetsu Yanagi’s philosophical writings on Zen Buddhism and Zen aesthetics (as expounded in his essays published in The unknown craftsman: a Japanese insight into beauty), as well as the being-historical writing of Martin Heidegger as encountered in his publication Mindfulness, in order to point out the similarities in thought expressed in these two publications with regard to the way in which the ordinary affords access to the extraordinary. In this way Heidegger’s terms ‘be-ing’ and ‘being’ are related to Yanagi’s framework of the relationship between ‘wabi’ and ‘shibui’. In the process Heidegger’s thought is hermeneutically interpreted in terms of Yanagi’s explication of the Zen notion of non-dualist beauty.
4

Emerging Views on Making: Fibre Graduates Reflect on their Practice

Morris, Kathleen 20 November 2013 (has links)
This narrative research examines the ways in which craft is conceptualized from the perspective of five recent graduates from the Material Art and Design Fibre Program at a prominent Canadian art and design university. Recognizing the cultural currents that have excised acts of making, including Western de-industrialization and abundant access to offshore labour markets, this research looks at the role of maker within a new societal context. A nascent theoretical platform for craft, shaped by artists and academics, counters a dearth of voices that has characterized the field’s history. Here, craft is posited as a methodology, characterized by embodiment, subjectivity, resistance, and skill. The experience of emerging makers, and their reflection in relation to this theoretical framework, allows for a broader consideration of present-day craft practice, and a renewed consideration of material arts curricula.
5

Emerging Views on Making: Fibre Graduates Reflect on their Practice

Morris, Kathleen 20 November 2013 (has links)
This narrative research examines the ways in which craft is conceptualized from the perspective of five recent graduates from the Material Art and Design Fibre Program at a prominent Canadian art and design university. Recognizing the cultural currents that have excised acts of making, including Western de-industrialization and abundant access to offshore labour markets, this research looks at the role of maker within a new societal context. A nascent theoretical platform for craft, shaped by artists and academics, counters a dearth of voices that has characterized the field’s history. Here, craft is posited as a methodology, characterized by embodiment, subjectivity, resistance, and skill. The experience of emerging makers, and their reflection in relation to this theoretical framework, allows for a broader consideration of present-day craft practice, and a renewed consideration of material arts curricula.
6

Establishing and managing a studio pottery

Nervig, Gerard Daniel January 2011 (has links)
Typescript. / Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
7

The Craftsman: of the Hand and the Heart

January 2017 (has links)
To gain the title of master is not an easy feat1. Learning a particular craft takes time, attention and dedication. Recently, this type of commitment has become old fashioned, even burdensome. New commitments to production and efficiency have forced the American craftsmen and builders to change theirs as well. This shift has in many ways removed the thinking from making2. It has removed the joy of labor and craft, in effect removing the dignity and pride of work3. Current architectural discourse has emphasized and promoted personal value and self-worth through the buildings we build. However, the promotion of this ethical stance has gone largely unnoticed towards the builders of the American built environment. By placing the tool back into the craftsmanÕs hands and teaching him how to think he begins to more fully know himself and know his work. He becomes dignified through his craft. The employment of these skilled craftsmen raises the standards of building. The architect can be more reliant on the skill of e craftsman while the craftsman can be more assured of employment. One ceases to be above the other but both, with complementary skills, are able to achieve the full realization of their work through the other. / Yes
8

Corpus Leakage

Frid, Matilda January 2014 (has links)
We understand the world around us through categorization and classification. But things are morecomplex than that, life is mixed up, flowing and unable to stick to labels. The main purpose ofcorpus is to contain, organize and control food and beverages. Corpus objects are also socialmarkers that have a tradition of being elitist; in both choice of material and in that they imply acertain way of usage. Corpus objects are heavily loaded with tradition and rituals. However, eatingis a common experience, it is an everyday ritual and often something we do with others. How andwhat we eat is an expression of our everyday culture. The corpus object is a body on its own terms,and I believe that this opens up for an emotional relation to these objects. Corpus has the possibilityof creating meetings, situations where we can feel and talk about something human, through anobject. Objects within the craft/art field may go beyond mere objects, and open up for newmeetings, they may do something else to us than what we are used to, and hopefully they cancommunicate with us in a new way about our culture and our everyday life. I want to create thingsthat go beyond being objects, I want to highlight the body of the object, I want the object andsubject relation to leek and I want to celebrate the fuzziness and the uncertainty of things with my work.
9

Control of fully submerged hydrofoil craft acceleration feedback methods to improve performance in high sea states

Kamenngan, Panlop January 1995 (has links)
No description available.
10

Process control of applied laser system for enhanced glass production

Zheng, Liyun. January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--West Virginia University, 2000. / Title from document title page. Document formatted into pages; contains xiv, 195 p. : ill. (some col.). Vita. Includes abstract. Includes bibliographical references (p. 172-177).

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