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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

Immunological and molecular studies of shrimp allergens.

January 1993 (has links)
by Chow Wing Kuen. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1993. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 94-109). / Abstract --- p.i / Acknowledgements --- p.iii / Table of contents --- p.v / List of Tables --- p.viii / List of Figures --- p.ix / Abbreviations --- p.xi / Chapter Chapter 1 --- General Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Literature review / Chapter 2.1 --- Hypersensitivity to Crustacea --- p.3 / Chapter 2.2 --- Characterization of allergens of shrimp --- p.10 / Chapter 2.3 --- Cross reactivity of crustacean allergens --- p.18 / Chapter 2.4 --- Molecular cloning and expression of allergens --- p.22 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Immunological characterization of shrimp allergens / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.26 / Chapter 3.2 --- Material and Methods / Chapter 3.2.1 --- Animals --- p.28 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- Sera --- p.28 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- Shrimp tissue extract --- p.29 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Dot blotting --- p.29 / Chapter 3.2.5 --- Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) --- p.30 / Chapter 3.2.6 --- Immunoblotting --- p.32 / Chapter 3.3.7 --- Immunological detection of IgE binding proteins --- p.32 / Chapter 3.3 --- Results / Chapter 3.3.1 --- Detection of allergens in raw and cooked shrimp muscle extract --- p.35 / Chapter 3.3.2 --- Detection of allergens in hepatopancreas and ovary of the shrimp --- p.38 / Chapter 3.3.3 --- Detection of allergens in boiling shrimp fluid --- p.42 / Chapter 3.3.4 --- Detection of allergens in dried shrimp --- p.48 / Chapter 3.3.5 --- Reactivity of IgE from the shrimp- sensitive subjects with extracts from different species of penaeid shrimp --- p.48 / Chapter 3.3.6 --- Reactivity of IgE from the shrimp- sensitive subjects with muscle extracts of crustaceans and mollusks --- p.52 / Chapter 3.4 --- Discussion --- p.55 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- "Construction and immunoscreening of the cDNA library from muscle of the shrimp, Metapenaeus ensis" / Chapter 4.1 --- Introduction --- p.63 / Chapter 4.2 --- Materials and Methods / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Animals --- p.66 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Sera --- p.66 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- Controlling ribonuclease activity --- p.66 / Chapter 4.2.4 --- Isolation of total RNA --- p.67 / Chapter 4.2.5 --- Isolation of mRNA / Chapter 4.2.5.1 --- Oligo-d(T) cellulose chromatography --- p.68 / Chapter 4.2.5.2 --- Magnetic separation --- p.70 / Chapter 4.2.6 --- Synthesis of double stranded cDNA --- p.71 / Chapter 4.2.7 --- Generation of EcoRI cohesive ends on cDNA --- p.72 / Chapter 4.2.8 --- Ligation of cDNA with λgtll vector --- p.74 / Chapter 4.2.9 --- In vitro packaging --- p.74 / Chapter 4.2.10 --- Titration of phage library --- p.75 / Chapter 4.2.11 --- Absorption of anti-E.coli antibodies --- p.76 / Chapter 4.2.12 --- Immunoscreening of the shrimp muscle cDNA library --- p.77 / Chapter 4.3 --- Results --- p.80 / Chapter 4.4 --- Discussion --- p.89 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- General conclusion --- p.92 / References --- p.94
32

DNA taxonomy of infraorder Caridea (Crustacea: Decapoda).

January 2007 (has links)
Lei Ho Chee. / Thesis submitted in: December 2006. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 140-153). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Abstract --- p.i / Abstract (Chinese) --- p.iii / Acknowledgements --- p.v / Contents --- p.vi / List of Tables --- p.x / List of Figures --- p.xii / Chapter 1 General Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter 2 Literature Review --- p.4 / Chapter 2.1 --- DNA taxonomy --- p.4 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- Definitions --- p.4 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Significance of DNA taxonomy --- p.5 / Chapter 2.1.3 --- DNA taxonomy in different animals --- p.5 / Chapter 2.1.4 --- Studying DNA taxonomy on Crustacea with different gene markers --- p.6 / Chapter 2.1.4.1 --- Mitochondrial gene makers --- p.6 / Chapter 2.1.4.2 --- Nuclear gene marker --- p.9 / Chapter 2.1.5 --- Phylogenetic construction methods --- p.10 / Chapter 2.2 --- Taxonomy of infraorder Caridea based on morphologies --- p.13 / Chapter 2.3 --- DNA barcodes --- p.29 / Chapter 2.3.1 --- Idea of barcodes --- p.29 / Chapter 2.3.2 --- Significance of DNA barcode --- p.29 / Chapter 2.3.3 --- Mitochondrial COI gene as DNA barcode --- p.30 / Chapter 2.3.3.1 --- Species identification with COI gene --- p.31 / Chapter 2.3.3.2 --- Revealing cryptic species with COI gene --- p.31 / Chapter 2.3.4 --- Limitations of DNA barcodes --- p.32 / Chapter 2.4 --- Species Diagnosis with hybridization methods --- p.34 / Chapter 2.4.1 --- Species diagnosis with mircoarray --- p.35 / Chapter 2.4.2 --- Species diagnosis with dot blot hybridization --- p.35 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- DNA Taxonomy of Infraorder Caridea --- p.39 / Chapter 3.1 --- Introduction --- p.39 / Chapter 3.2 --- Materials and Methods --- p.40 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- Sample collection --- p.40 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- DNA extraction and PCR amplification --- p.41 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- DNA sequencing --- p.48 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Phylogenetic analysis --- p.49 / Chapter 3.3 --- Results --- p.50 / Chapter 3.3.1 --- Sequence composition --- p.50 / Chapter 3.3.2 --- Comparisons of sequences divergence --- p.52 / Chapter 3.3.3 --- Phylogenetic analysis using the four gene regions --- p.76 / Chapter 3.3.3.1 --- COI --- p.76 / Chapter 3.3.3.2 --- 16S rRNA --- p.95 / Chapter 3.3.3.3 --- 12S rRNA --- p.96 / Chapter 3.3.3.4 --- 18S rRNA --- p.97 / Chapter 3.3.3.5 --- Combined analysis of 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA --- p.98 / Chapter 3.3.3.6 --- Composition vector analysis of 18S rRNA --- p.99 / Chapter 3.3.4 --- Saturation analysis --- p.99 / Chapter 3.4 --- Discussion --- p.105 / Chapter 3.4.1 --- Evaluation of the four DNA markers --- p.105 / Chapter 3.4.1.1 --- COI --- p.105 / Chapter 3.4.1.2 --- 16S rRNA and 12S rRNA --- p.107 / Chapter 3.4.1.3 --- 18SrRNA --- p.109 / Chapter 3.4.2 --- Comparison with morphological classification schemes --- p.111 / Chapter 3.4.2.1 --- Relationships at family level --- p.111 / Chapter 3.4.2.2 --- Relationships at superfamily level --- p.116 / Chapter 3.4.2.3 --- Relationship among superfamilies --- p.121 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- Development of specific probes for caridean family identification --- p.122 / Chapter 4.1 --- Introduction --- p.122 / Chapter 4.2 --- Methods and Materials --- p.123 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Probe design --- p.123 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Probe labeling and checking yield --- p.125 / Chapter 4.2.3 --- Preparation of target DNA and dot-blot --- p.126 / Chapter 4.2.4 --- Pre-hybridization and hybridization --- p.128 / Chapter 4.2.5 --- Stripping of membrane --- p.129 / Chapter 4.2.6 --- Preparation of chemicals and reagents --- p.129 / Chapter 4.3 --- Results --- p.131 / Chapter 4.4 --- Discussion --- p.135 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- General Conclusion --- p.138 / Literature cited --- p.140 / Appendices 1. Aligned sequences of mitochondrial COI gene --- p.154 / 2. Aligned sequences of mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene --- p.162 / 3. Aligned sequences of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene --- p.168 / 4. Aligned sequences of nuclear 18S rRNA gene --- p.172
33

Molecular phylogenetic relationship of species complexes in the genus Heterocarpus (Decapoda pandalidae).

January 2004 (has links)
Chu Wai-ling. / Thesis submitted in: December 2003. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 106-114). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Abstract --- p.i / Abstract (Chinese) --- p.iii / Acknowledgments --- p.v / Contents --- p.vi / List of Tables --- p.ix / List of Figures --- p.x / Chapter Chapter 1 --- General Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter Chapter 2 --- Literature Review --- p.8 / Chapter 2.1 --- Introduction to phylogenetic biology --- p.8 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- Definition of phylogenetics --- p.8 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Why employ molecular genetic markers in phylogenetics? --- p.8 / Chapter 2.2 --- DNA analysis and the contributions to phylogenetics --- p.10 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- Historical development of DNA analysis in phylogenetics --- p.10 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) --- p.12 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Animal mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) --- p.14 / Chapter 2.3 --- Molecular phylogeny of crustaceans --- p.16 / Chapter 2.3.1 --- Phylogenetic studies of crustaceans using nuclear ribosomal DNA --- p.16 / Chapter 2.3.2 --- Phylogenetic studies of crustaceans using mitochondrial DNA --- p.17 / Chapter 2.4 --- Taxonomy of the genus Heterocarpus --- p.22 / Chapter Chapter 3 --- Materials and Methods --- p.36 / Chapter 3.1 --- Collection and storage of specimens --- p.36 / Chapter 3.2 --- DNA extraction --- p.36 / Chapter 3.3 --- Amplification of mitochondrial genes --- p.38 / Chapter 3.3.1 --- PCR profile --- p.39 / Chapter 3.3.1.1 --- 16SrRNA gene --- p.39 / Chapter 3.3.1.2 --- COI gene --- p.42 / Chapter 3.3.1.2.1 --- Amplification of COI gene segments using primers LCD1490/HCO2198 --- p.42 / Chapter 3.3.1.2.2 --- Amplification of COI gene segments using primers COIf/COIa and COIp3/COIa --- p.43 / Chapter 3.4 --- DNA sequencing --- p.44 / Chapter 3.4.1 --- Purification of extension products --- p.45 / Chapter 3.4.2 --- Electrophoresis and data collection --- p.46 / Chapter 3.5 --- Data analysis --- p.47 / Chapter Chapter 4 --- Results --- p.50 / Chapter 4.1 --- PCR products of 16S rRNA and COI genes --- p.50 / Chapter 4.2 --- Genetic variability in Heterocarpus based on partial DNA sequence of 16S rRNA gene --- p.52 / Chapter 4.3 --- Genetic variability in Heterocarpus based on COI gene --- p.61 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Genetic variability in Heterocarpus based on partial DNA sequence of COI gene --- p.61 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- Genetic variability in Heterocarpus based on amino acid sequence of COI --- p.69 / Chapter 4.4 --- Phylogenetic analysis --- p.75 / Chapter 4.4.1 --- Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence --- p.75 / Chapter 4.4.2 --- Phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequence of COI gene --- p.80 / Chapter 4.4.3 --- Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acid sequence of COI --- p.84 / Chapter 4.5 --- Kishino-Hasegawa and Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests --- p.86 / Chapter Chapter 5 --- Discussion --- p.90 / Chapter 5.1 --- Examination on the validity of the four Heterocarpus complexes --- p.90 / Chapter 5.2 --- Phylogenetic relationship of Heterocarpus species within each complex --- p.91 / Chapter 5.2.1 --- Phylogenetic relationship of Heterocarpus species within H.gibbosus complex --- p.92 / Chapter 5.2.2 --- Phylogenetic relationship of Heterocarpus species within H.woodmasoni complex --- p.94 / Chapter 5.2.3 --- Phylogenetic relationship of Heterocarpus species within H. ensifer and H. sibogae complexes --- p.96 / Chapter 5.3 --- Phylogenetic relationship among Heterocarpus complexes --- p.98 / Chapter 5.4 --- "Comparisons of phylogenetic resolving power of 16S rRNA, COI and 28S rRNA genes" --- p.100 / Chapter Chapter 6 --- Conclusions --- p.104 / Literature Cited --- p.106
34

The larval histories of four porcellanid anomurans (Crustacea, Decapoda) from Oregon /

Gonor, Sue Lewayne. January 1970 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 1970. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 102-106). Also available on the World Wide Web.
35

The ghost shrimp, Callianassa californiensis Dana, 1854, in Yaquina Bay, Oregon

McCrow, Lynne Tucker 29 July 1971 (has links)
The life cycle of Callianassa californiensis Dana, 1854, was studied in the tidal estuary, Yaquina Bay, Oregon. At this latitude it is largely restricted to intertidal sandy mudflats under predominately marine influence. Salinity and temperature appear to determine its distribution to a greater extent than does sediment type. Vertical movement within the sediment is related to the tides on a day to day basis and to temperature on a seasonal basis. Large-scale breeding generally begins in the spring, and ovigerous females may be plentiful in the cooler layers of mud until August. It is not clear what triggers larval release, but temperature and tidal conditions seem to be important. All five zoeal stages are found in the plankton from the mouth of the bay to three miles offshore during late spring and summer. Nearshore waters appear to act as a larval reservoir along this part of the coast, and successful larval settlement may depend upon high-tide transport into a bay. / Graduation date: 1972
36

Seasonal cycles, population dynamics, and production of copepods in the Arctic.

Cairns, Alan Andrew January 1969 (has links)
No description available.
37

The systematics and biology of the family Phronimidae : crustacea, amphipoda.

Shih, Chang-tai. January 1966 (has links)
This is the first attempt to study the circumglobal pelagic planktonts of the Family Phronimidae collected from all oceans. Before Vosseler (1901) published his work on the systematics of the phronimid species, the sexual dimorphism and the age variation in these animals proved confusing to the taxonomists. Synonyms of the species were mostly made at this period. [...]
38

Adaptive responses to temperature in homogeneously and heterogeneously acclimated crabs

Pearson, Timothy January 1998 (has links)
Walking leg closer muscle neuromuscular parameters were recorded electrophysiologically from homothermally and heterothermally acclimated Carcinus maenas (eurythermic) and Cancer pagurus (stenothermic). Homothermal (and immobilised) crabs of both species were acclimated to either 8 C or 22 C, whereas heterothermally acclimated crabs were acclimated to 8 C and 22 C coincidentally, exposing the animal's central nervous system (CNS) to either the warm (22 C) or cold (8 C) acclimation temperature. Thus, heterothermal acclimation exposes the CNS/endocrine system and one set of walking legs at one acclimation temperature, the contralateral walking legs are acclimated to the other acclimation temperature. This allowed an investigation into the CNS influence on the attainment of acclimation by walking legs. Comparisons of acclimation responses of the neuromuscular function of isolated walking legs from the same animal were done with respect to the walking leg and CNS acclimation temperatures experienced. Animals were acclimated for two weeks, recordings were taken of excitatory junctional potentials (EJP) etc., from dactylopodite closer muscle fibres when stimulated by the tonic motor axon over an experimental temperature range (6-26 C).The acclimation responses in homothermally exposed crabs of both species resulted in partial (Precht, type III) responses in resting potential, single and double pulse stimulated excitatory junctional potential amplitudes, these were interpreted as responses that allowed the maintenance of muscle function in the new thermal condition. With respect to long term thermal acclimation other electrophysiological parameters gave equivocal compensatory responses. Capacity acclimation responses were more complete in C.pagurus than C.maenas. In heterothermally acclimated animals resting potentials and EJP amplitudes revealed partial acclimation responses in a compensatory manner. Acclimation of heterothermally acclimated C.maenas and C.pagurus was determined to be independent of a CNS influence, indicating thermal acclimation was in response to the local tissue acclimation temperature.
39

Diel activity of benthic crustaceans in the Columbia River estuary

Davis, John Steven 28 August 1978 (has links)
Graduation date: 1979
40

Ecological Study of the Decapod Crustaceans Commensal with the Branching Coral Pocillopora Meandrina Var. Nobilis Verrill

Barry, Charles Kevin 06 1900 (has links)
A quantitative study of the decapod crustacean community commensal with the coral Pocillopora meandrina var. nobilis Verrill was undertaken and was accomplished through an analysis of communities collected in coral heads in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu. The coral head microhabitat was described and analyzed. The community was described and its relationship to the coral head habitat defined. It was found that community composition was affected by coral head size and that relative composition of the communities changed as the coral heads increased in size. Through stomach contents analysis and trophic behavior experiments the commensals were found to utilize the coral as a source of food, primarily by feeding on material caught on the coral. A correlation between the total biomass of the crustacean community and the surface area of the coral heads in which they were collected was found, suggesting that the com- munity is limited by the amount of surface area of a coralhead This may reflect the amount of food available to the symbionts. There was no good correlation between surface area of the corals and the biomass of the individual components of the community, indicating that other factors, such as the behavioral peculiarity of pairing and interspecific competition probably determine the exact composition of the community that a coral head can support. It was concluded that the crustaceans studied were true commensals with the coral, and that the commensal association involves the host providing a source of food as well as protection for the symbionts. / Typescript. Bibliography: leaves 62-64.

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