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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The invitational attitude of teachers and the culture of teaching and learning

Naidoo, Indira January 2002 (has links)
Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR OF EDUCATION in the Department of Educational Psychology of the Faculty of Education at the University of Zululand, 2002. / The aim of this investigation was to establish the effect of the invitational attitude of teachers on the culture of teaching and learning. This entailed a detailed literature study of the factors affecting the culture of teaching and learning at schools, viz. school related factors, factors in the family and living environment, societal factors and personal characteristics. A further literature study on the invitational attitude of teachers and its effect on the culture of teaching and learning at schools were done. South African education is presently facing major challenges. It is widely recognised that it is essential to transform the apartheid-based system of the past into an egalitarian one. There were imbalances and inequalities amongst separate education departments. The blacks were the most disadvantaged. From the empirical investigation it was concluded that the quality of an education system is more dependent on the attitude of the teachers than any other single factor. The absence of a culture of teaching and learning in schools can be reversed by the inviting attitude of the teachers who by estabhshing a personal relationship, frees the learner to learn and leads him to adulthood. For the purpose of the empirical investigation a prepared questionnaire was administered to 300 grade 12 learners of six secondary schools (two predominately black schools, two predominately coloured schools and two predominately Indian schools). The data obtained from the completed questionnaire were processed and analysed by means of descriptive and inferential statistics. Findings confirmed that the invitational attitude of teachers plays a significant role in promoting the culture of teaching and learning. In conclusion, a summary and findings emanating from the literature study and the descriptive and inferential statistics were presented. Based on these findings the following recommendations were made: ❖ All teachers should be governed by a code of conduct that will prohibit unprofessional disinviting behaviour. ❖ All learners should be governed by a code of conduct that will enhance positive behaviour and attitude towards learning. ❖ Further research must be done regarding the invitational attitude of teachers and its effect on the culture of teaching and learning.
2

The effect of crime in schools on a culture of teaching and learning

Thabethe, Bhekumuzi Muzingendoda January 2010 (has links)
Submitted in fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of DOCTOR OF EDUCATION in the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education of the Faculty of Education at the University of Zululand, 2010. / The study investigated the effect of crime in schools on a culture of teaching and learning. In this study the researcher employed a survey to achieve the aims of the study, and a questionnaire to obtain facts and opinions about the effect of crime in schools on a culture of teaching and learning. All children between the ages of 7 and 15 have a right to education. However, this right becomes meaningless unless the Department of Education, principals, educators, parents, children, learners, citizens and community members commit themselves to curbing crime and making the school environment conducive to learning. Crime has a negative influence on the morale of both educators and learners, as well as the culture of teaching and learning. Each educator and learner has the right to work and play in a secure and safe school environment and neighbourhood. Therefore it is important to do everything possible to eliminate crime in schools and neighbourhoods. Schools need to create a space where educators can teach and learners can learn. Teaching and learning require a safe and tolerant learning environment that celebrates innocence and values human dignity. From the literature study it became clear that many of the young people of South Africa will end up as drug addicts, violent criminals and anti-social individuals, rather than being an asset to the nation and the country’s economy. According to Shone (2007:27) crime is a “runaway train, reckless, out of control, unpredictably dangerous, picking up speed as it careers down the track towards schools”. For the purpose of the empirical investigation, a self-structured questionnaire for educators was utilized. The data obtained from the completed questionnaires was processed and analyzed by means of descriptive statistics. The findings from the empirical study confirmed that crime in schools has a negative effect on a culture of teaching and learning. In conclusion a summary of the study was presented and based on the findings of the literature and empirical study, the following recommendations were made:  The Department of Education must develop a practical formal policy on the safety of schools in collaboration with stakeholders like community structures, local private security companies, the South African Police Service, Social Workers and Psychologists.  Sufficient human and financial resources must be made available by the Department of Education for the training, supervision and monitoring of the school safety policy.  The Department of Education must also encourage communities, non-governmental organizations, faith-based organizations, and business, to support school safety initiatives and promote a safe learning environment.  The school’s code of conduct must be consulted when school safety policy is formulated. The code of conduct’s primary function is to ensure the safety of learners at school.  A code of conduct should contain regulations outlining the rules that the principal and the governing body must ensure are included in the code. The code of conduct must, inter alia: • aim to establish a disciplined and purposeful school environment; dedicated to the improvement and maintenance of a quality learning process, • outline how learners who disobey the code of conduct will be punished, • include a process for protecting the learner and any other party involved in disciplinary proceedings, and • include rules relating to school wear (cf.5.4.1).  For the code of conduct to be functional and successful class teachers must ensure that: • All learners have a copy of the code of conduct. • A copy of the code of conduct is displayed on the notice board in the classroom. • Learners follow the regulations as laid down in the code of conduct. • A code of conduct is periodically scrutinized by the school safety committee and amended when necessary.  The school safety policy must have clear and concise directives as to what is expected from the regions, districts, circuits, wards and schools.
3

The role of the School Management Team in promoting a culture of teaching and learning

Naidoo, Jagathesan January 1999 (has links)
Submitted in fulfilment of the requirement for the degree MASTER OF EDUCATION in the Department of Educational Psychology of the Faculty of Education at the University of Zululand, 1999. / The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the school management team in promoting a culture of teaching and learning. From the literature study it became evident that the culture of teaching and learning in many South African schools has almost disappeared in its entirety. Most of the schools of the former education departments responsible for black education are characterised by a high failure rate, early school dropout, lack of discipline, low morale and an anti-academic attitude amongst teachers as well as learners. To these schools very little has changed since 1994 when the new government came into power. It would appear that a culture of teaching and learning in these schools does not exists. The ongoing turmoil in these schools underscores, inter alia, the failure of school management teams in assuming responsibility for promoting a culture of teaching and learning. Promoting a culture of teaching and learning involves a collaborative act between school management, teachers and learners. Many stakeholders in education seem to be helpless when confronted with problems related to teaching and learning in schools. It often seems as if their hope rests in the initiatives of school management teams to promote a culture of teaching and learning. The members of school management teams, as educational leaders, therefore have a vital role to play in creating a culture of teaching and learning. Although it is generally believed that school management teams, as educational leaders, are responsible for promoting a culture of teaching and learning, the situation is far from satisfactory. The causes for the absence of a culture of teaching and learning can be attributed to factors concerning the learners, factors concerning the school environment, societal factors and problems concerning the homes of learners and their living environment as well as the lack of parental involvement in the formal education of their children. Members of school management teams should have no uncertainties as to their responsibilities as educational leaders. Principals, deputy principals and heads of departments are both educational leaders and managers and their primary task or responsibility is to ensure that effective teaching and learning takes place. For the purpose of the empirical investigation a self structured questionnaire for members of school management teams was utilised. The data obtained from the completed questionnaires were processed and analyzed by means of descriptive statistics. Findings confirmed that the school management team has a significant role to play in promoting a culture of teaching and learning. In conclusion a summary was presented on the findings of the study and the following are some of the recommendations that were made: The members of the school management team must inculculate positive attitudes and values in teachers and learners. All teachers should be governed by a code of conduct that will prohibit unprofessional behaviour. The management team must ensure the adoption of a code of conduct for learners.
4

Governing bodies' perspectives on a culture of teaching and learning

Chetty, Lutchman Soobramoney January 1998 (has links)
A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR of EDUCATION in the department of Educational Psychology in the FACULTY OF EDUCATION at the UNlVERSITY OF ZULULAND, 1998. / This study involves an investigation of governing bodies' perspectives on a culture of teaching and learning. An attempt was made to determine if governing bodies are adequately trained to play a meaningful role in the re-establishment of a culture of teaching and learning at schools. The literature study discloses that education in South Africa is going through a crisis. It is common knowledge that the culture of teaching and learning has almost disappeared in its entirety in many schools. Schools are characterised by an anti-academic attitude by teachers as well as pupils. Many parents seem to be helpless when confronted with problems related to their children's schooling. Their only hope rests in governing bodies' and principals' initiatives to re-establish a culture of teaching and learning. Governing bodies and principals therefore have a vital role to play in creating a culture of teaching and learning. In the interest of the education of children, they need to work in concert with each other. Their working together is a collaborative act, marked by cooperation and support for each other. The investigation proved that governing bodies have not been adequately trained to deal with problems associated with the culture of teaching and learning. Despite the South African Schools Act, 1996 (Act No.84 of 1996) ushering in a new era of parental involvement in school governance, parents were not systematically empowered to deal with their new responsibilities. The failure of the Department of Education to embark on a meaningful capacity-building programme for school governors has inhibited governing bodies' contribution towards education. For the purpose of the empirical investigation a self-structured questionnaire for parent governors was utilised. The questionnaires that were completed by parent governors were analysed and thereafter the data that was obtained was processed and analysed. This study has confirmed that governing bodies were not adequately trained to play a meaningful role in the re-establishment of a culture of teaching and learning at schools. In addition to the empirical survey, personal interviews with members of governing bodies were conducted. In conclusion a summary was presented and based on the findings of this study, the following are some of the recommendations that were made: * All governing bodies should develop and enforce a code of conduct which will provide a set of guidelines to regulate the behaviour of pupils so that a disciplined and purposeful environment is established at schools to facilitate effective teaching and learning. * All teachers should be governed by a code of conduct that will prohibit unprofessional behaviour. * Governing bodies should offer incentives to principals and teachers who introduce innovative ideas and methods to promote the culture of teaching and learning. * Through structured education programmes governing bodies must prepare parents to assume responsibility for the education of their children.
5

The role of RCLs in the promotion of the culture of teaching and learning in secondary schools

Mdimore, Bhekumuzi Muzingendoda January 2004 (has links)
A dissertation submitted to the FACULTY OF EDUCATION at the UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF EDUCATION in the Department of Educational Planning and Administration, 2004. / The study investigated the role of RCLs in the promotion of the culture of teaching and learning in secondary schools. In this study the researcher employed a survey to achieve the aims of the study, and a questionnaire to obtain facts and opinions about the role of the RCL members. From the empirical study conducted in Pinetown District, the researcher found that the majority of the members of the RCLs in schools studied does contribute to the promotion of the culture of teaching and learning. However there was remarkably high percentage (65%) of respondents who were uncertain about the RCLs' role in facilitating the promotion of the culture of teaching and learning in secondary schools. Briefly data indicates that the uncertainty about the role functions of RCLs is due to the lack of training. Based on the findings of the study, the researcher made recommendations directed to the principals and the department of education and culture. The key recommendations are: > Principals need to develop appropriate and effective capacity building programmes for RCL members. > RCL members should be given a platform to communicate with the general learner population to facilitate and foster discipline among learners in schools. > Members of the RCL should be granted their legitimate rights to participate in decisions that affect them.
6

Parents and principals as partners in creating a culture of learning

Pillay, Devalingum Saminathan January 1998 (has links)
Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF EDUCATION in the Department of Educational Psychology of the UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND, 1998. / The aim of this study was to pursue an investigation on parents and principals as partners in creating a culture of learning. From the literature study it became evident that education in South Africa has collapsed in many schools. The majority of schools of the former education departments responsible for Black education are characterised by a high failure rate, early school dropout, a lack of discipline, low morale and an anti-academic attitude amongst pupils. To these schools very little has changed since 1994. It would appear that a "culture of teaching and learning" in these schools does not exist. The ongoing turmoil in these schools underscores the failure of parents and principals to work together as partners in assuming responsibility for creating a culture of learning. Creating a culture of learning involves a collaborative act between parents and principals. Neither the parent nor the principal alone can fulfil the task of educating the child adequately. In the interest of the education of the child, the contact and cooperation between parents and principals should denote a partnership. Although the premise exists that parents (child's primary educator) and principals (child's secondary educator) are indispensable partners for creating a culture of learning, the situation is far from satisfactory. A huge majority of schools in the previously disadvantaged African community has failed badly. The causes for the absence of a learning culture can be attributed to factors concerning the pupils, factors concerning the school environment, problems concerning the homes of pupils and their living environment as well as the lack of parental involvement in the formal education of their children. Parents and principals as educators have a vital role to play in creating a culture of learning. Parents should have no uncertainties as to their educational responsibilities as primary educators. Principals are both educational leaders and managers and their primary task or responsibility is to ensure that effective teaching and learning takes place at their schools. For the purpose of the empirical investigation two separate self-structured questionnaires for parents and principals were utilised. In addition five postulates pertaining to a partnership between parents and principals were formulated to give direction to this study. The questionnaires that were completed by parents and principals were analyzed and thereafter the data that were obtained was processed and analyzed. This study has confirmed that a meaningful partnership between the parents and the principals is lacking in the majority of schools with regard to the mutual sharing of: * responsibilities; * information; * decision-making; * skills; and * accountability. In conclusion a summary was presented and based on the findings of this study, the following are some of the recommendations that were made: * Effective media-based parent education programme on parental involvement must be instituted. * The establishment of schools as community learning centres must receive immediate attention. * The principal must receive training in and accept responsibility tor initiating parental involvement. The Department of Education and Culture must: ° ensure that parents and principals are encouraged and supported to become partners in creating a culture of learning by providing them with the necessary guidelines and information; ° make certain that workshops, seminars, lectures and in-service training programmes are conducted for principals on school management and parental involvement; ° provide all members serving on Governing Bodies full training and support in the responsible exercise of their duties, powers and functions; and ° actively propagate the importance of nurturing a harmonious partnership between parents and principals by promoting mutual trust, respect, loyalty, frankness and understanding for each other. The teaching profession and teacher unions must assume responsibility for creating a culture of learning. The principals and inspectors must ensure that effective teaching is taking place at schools. In undertaking their teaching responsibilities, teachers must become highly professional. The principals and teacher unions must take disciplinary actions against those teachers who violate the code of conduct for teachers.
7

The relationship between the school principals' instructional leadership role and the academic perfomance of pupils in Swaziland primary schools

Khoza, Joyce Fikile 04 1900 (has links)
This research investigated the relationship between the school principal’s instructional leadership role and the academic performance of pupils in Swaziland primary schools. A qualitative investigation was conducted using individual and focus group interviewing. This was supplemented by a study of official documents on instructional leadership at each research site and the observation of the prevailing culture of teaching and learning traits at each school. A research sample of eight school principals and forty teachers was purposefully drawn from eight well-performing primary schools in the Southern Hhohho region of Swaziland. The findings of the study confirmed that the school principal’s instructional leadership role serves as a pillar for the development and sustainment of a sound culture of teaching and learning in order to ensure that learners achieve optimally. Based on the perceptions of school principal and teacher participants, strategies were developed for effective instructional leadership so as to ensure optimal learner performance. / Educational Leadership and Management / M. Ed. (Education Management)
8

The relationship between the school principals' instructional leadership role and the academic perfomance of pupils in Swaziland primary schools

Khoza, Joyce Fikile 04 1900 (has links)
This research investigated the relationship between the school principal’s instructional leadership role and the academic performance of pupils in Swaziland primary schools. A qualitative investigation was conducted using individual and focus group interviewing. This was supplemented by a study of official documents on instructional leadership at each research site and the observation of the prevailing culture of teaching and learning traits at each school. A research sample of eight school principals and forty teachers was purposefully drawn from eight well-performing primary schools in the Southern Hhohho region of Swaziland. The findings of the study confirmed that the school principal’s instructional leadership role serves as a pillar for the development and sustainment of a sound culture of teaching and learning in order to ensure that learners achieve optimally. Based on the perceptions of school principal and teacher participants, strategies were developed for effective instructional leadership so as to ensure optimal learner performance. / Educational Leadership and Management / M. Ed. (Education Management)
9

The role of parents, teachers and the state in the establishment of a culture of teaching and learning : a study in time perspective

Shiluvane, Samuel Mugebisa 11 1900 (has links)
This thesis reflected upon the historical roots of the problems which prevent parents, teachers and the state from fulfilling their societal functions in such a way that a culture of teaching and learning is established. It was emphasised that during the traditional period (1554-1799) parents, teachers and the state (chiefs) played a leading role in the upbringing of children to the extent that there were few factors militating against the establishment of a culture of teaching and learning. From 1799 up to 1910 education was under the control of missionaries. Missionaries made the mistake of encouraging the weakening of traditional values once effectively employed in raising children. Parents were not given an opportunity to play an effective role in the education oftheir children. Schools lacked resources. Teachers were poorly paid and ill qualified. In spite of these shortcomings, missionaries did more good than harm in creating favourable conditions for teaching and learning. It was also indicated that from 1910 up to 1953 education was under the control of the missionaries and provincial administrations (backed by the Union Government). The era was characterised by: • The state giving increasing financial assistance to schools • The teachers' fight for the improvement of their conditions of service and resources. • The limited participation given to parents in educational matters concerning their children. It was further indicated that when Bantu Education was introduced in 1953, schools became political battle-fields. Through the influence of political organisations, parents, teachers and school children organised strikes took place in protest against the Bantu Education system. The state relied on repressive measures to control education. The activities of political organisations and the state led to the breakdown of the culture of teaching and learning. The threatening situation in the country towards the late 1970s caused the state to realise the urgency of bringing reforms into education. The reforms brought about by the state were rejected by parents, teachers and school children. This resulted in the continuation of the crisis in education. Despite the dawn of the New Dispensation in 1990 parents, teachers and the state are worried by the deepening education crisis manifested in factors such as violence, increasing use of drugs and the Aids epidemic. Finally, it was indicated that there are no instant solutions to the deepening education crisis. What is important is that parents, teachers and the state should make a united effort to bring about a gradual improvement. / Educational Studies / D. Ed.(History of Education)
10

A phenomenological reflection on the role of the school principal as educational manager and instructional leader in Limpopo Province

Mamabolo, Caroline Sejeng 30 June 2002 (has links)
The aim of the research was to reflect phenomenologically on the role of the school principal as educational manager and instructional leader in enhancing a culture of teaching and learning in schools, and to reflect critically on this state of affairs in Limpopo Province. A literature study was undertaken to expose problems that deter principals from fulfilling these roles. Qualitative research in the form of ideograms, as well as, unstructured interviews with principles, was used to elicit principals' views concerning how they perceive their roles in an attempt to enhance a culture of teaching and learning in schools. Research findings indicated that principalship is beset with many problems which have to be addressed in order to restore the collapsed culture of teaching and learning in schools. Results revealed among other issues that: - The training of principals for the introduction of Outcomes Based Education in schools was not well carried out. It was incomprehensible for the Education Department to exclude principals from the training when the whole system of teaching and learning was supposed to change with the introduction of Outcomes Based Education - The redeployment and rationalisation of teachers has given rise to many complicated problems in schools, leaving teachers demoralised and being a major cause of job dissatisfaction for principals The research findings revealed that the role of principals as educational managers and instructional leaders in Limpopo Province is not authentically enacted. Recommendations include among other issues that: - The Department of Education in Limpopo Province review the implementation of Outcomes Based Education, particularly the training of principals - Attention should be given to problems arising from the process of redeployment and rationalisation of teachers in schools - There is a need for ongoing, effective and in-service lifelong training for teachers, principals and the School Governing Body with regard to education management. Attention to these issues, amongst others, it is proposed, will contribute to the effective implementation of the role of school principals as educational managers and instructional leaders, particularly in Limpopo Province. This will reinforce the desired culture of teaching and learning in schools. / Educational Studies / D. Ed. (Philosophy of Education)

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