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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

THE SOCIAL IMPACTS OF URBAN SECTIONS OF THE INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM.

CHERNOFF, MICHAEL LIGHT 01 January 1977 (has links)
Abstract not available
2

THE EFFECTS OF INTRAMETROPOLITAN MOBILITY ON RACIAL RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION

SPAIN, DAPHNE G 01 January 1977 (has links)
Abstract not available
3

RESIDENTIAL CONCENTRATION OF REFUGEES IN CALIFORNIA AND THE UNITED STATES

DOWNING, DOUGLAS CHARLES 01 January 1984 (has links)
Residential concentration of refugees (Southeast Asian, Cuban, and Soviet) was investigated using data from the Immigration and Naturalization Service Alien Address File. Patterns of concentration were investigated on a cross-state basis for 1970-1980, and on a cross California 3-digit zip code basis for 1978-1980. Refugee groups were compared to nonrefugee alien groups of similar origin (Japanese, Filipino, Mexican, Dominican, Italian, Polish, and Hungarian). Data sources were the INS Public Use samples for 1979 and 1980, and the total California alien populations for 1978-1980. Consistent cross-ethnic concentration differentials were found, although refugee populations were only slightly (but consistently) more segregated than were the total alien populations: Hispanic groups were most segregated, Europeans and Asians less so, and the Southeast Asians least segregated. Concentration patterns were different across the several geographic areas analyzed: Mexicans, for example were among the most highly segregated at the cross-state level, but were the least segregated at the zip code level within California. Clear preferences for different areas were seen among different ethnic groups: the multiplicity of colonies seen in earlier studies was found in this data also. Consistent linear increases in the concentration of both Vietnamese and Kampucheans were seen however, the latter being particularly striking in its magnitude. Slow increases in Soviet and Cuban concentration were also seen. Several factors argued for permanence of the ethnic concentrations now in existance. Only for Vietnamese was there a consistent pattern of decreased concentration with longer duration of residence; for other groups the ethnic concentrations were made of aliens with a cross-section of longevity. Resettlement of new refugee arrivals also exacerbated concentration, since the only few exceptions the patterns of refugee initial resettlement showed more concentration than among the already-settled populations. The ethnic concentration was potentially facilitative of adjustment, since much of the concentration appears to be forming from secondary migration: some negative effects of the ethnic concentration are suggested in slightly lower employment occurring in the ethnically concentrated areas.
4

Relationship of technology level of progress to school district demographic variables

Davis, Trina Joy 16 August 2006 (has links)
An exploratory study, using Texas public school district data, was conducted to determine the relationship between each of two demographic characteristics, student enrollment and the percentage of economically disadvantaged students, and the technology level of progress. In addition, the relationship between the two demographic characteristics, taken together, and the technology level of progress was investigated. The researcher found that across each of the six Educator Preparation and Development (EPD) focus areas, student enrollment, and the percentage of economically disadvantaged students were not related to the technology level of progress. The researcher also found that there was no meaningful multivariate relationship for linking student enrollment and the percentage of economically disadvantaged students, taken together, to the technology level of progress. A major finding that emerged from the analyses was the fact that the majority of school districts across the student enrollment and percentage of economically disadvantaged students categories were at the same level of technology progress, Developing Tech. Moreover, the percent of school districts not progressing beyond theDeveloping Tech level was differential for each of the six EPD focus areas. Two conclusions emerged from the empirical evidence. First, although the Target Tech level percentages were all small, two of the 20 types of Texas school districts consistently yielded the highest percents across the six EPD focus areas. These were school district type four (SE Under 500, PEDS 75% or Greater) and school district type twelve (SE 1,001-5,000, PEDS 75% or Greater). Second and more significant in terms of creating future interventions, programs, and incentives, empirical evidence in this study suggests that much work still remains to be done if all Texas school districts are to reach the ultimate objective where all school districts reach the Target Tech level on all six focus areas. The current study informs the digital divide literature as it relates to school district characteristics. The findings from this study suggest that long-range technology planning and funding initiatives in recent years have been successful, in beginning to address digital divide issues related to Educator Preparation and Development technology progress in public school districts.
5

Access to higher education in Germany and California

Guhr, Daniel J. January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
6

A study of attitudes towards beer products in Bangkok

Ramasut, Nattakarn, Saranpattranon, Suteera January 2009 (has links)
No description available.
7

A study of attitudes towards beer products in Bangkok

Ramasut, Nattakarn, Saranpattranon, Suteera January 2009 (has links)
No description available.
8

A Comprehensive Examination of the Determinants and Consequences of Political Trust among Latinos

Bonner, Dean E. 15 May 2009 (has links)
Political trust is an important concept in a representative democracy because it defines citizens’ expectations of their elected officials, their willingness to allow government to act on their behalf, and the quality of democratic accountability. Distrust, or when government outcomes fail to meet citizens' expectations, has been linked to discontent and disaffection, and to a broad decline in the legitimacy of government institutions. Research consistently shows that Latinos are more trusting than non-Latinos--a finding which seems discordant in light of the socio-economic and cultural differences between these groups. The concept of expectations is especially interesting and useful in examining differences in levels of political trust among Latinos and non-Latinos. The literature on Latino trust lacks any comprehensive analysis of the determinants and consequences of political trust among Latinos. This dissertation attempts to answer the following questions: What are the determinants of political trust among Latinos? Why are Latinos more trusting of government than non-Latinos? What impact does political trust have on Latino policy preferences and vote choice? Utilizing survey data of Californians, evidence I find that acculturation and country-of-origin variables account for differences between Latinos and non-Latinos, and that socio-economic variables do not. Latinos of Mexican origin are less trusting that other Latinos. Political trust has a negative impact of Latino support for health care reform, but no impact on non-Latino policy preferences in this area. Once again, trust impacts Mexican and non-Mexican Latinos differently. Finally, I confirm the positive relationship between political trust and voting for an incumbent (the negative relationship between trust and support for a major or minor party challenger); this relationship is constant across Latino and non-Latino groups.
9

Perceptions of justice: demographic variables and social position

Katz, Lesley-Anne 29 May 2009 (has links)
The current study aimed to explore peoples’ experiences of social and organisational justice, and in doing so asked three central questions. The first focused on whether there was a relationship between the different dimensions of justice, and the second on the commonalties and differences in peoples’ perceptions of justice. The third question looked at whether demographic variables, as markers of social identity, were predictive of such justice perceptions. The study was quantitative in nature, and made use of a non-experimental, partially exploratory, cross-sectional design. Four hundred and eight six employees of a large South African manufacturing organisation completed a self report questionnaire containing questions about a range of biographic, domestic, financial, employment, and religious information, as well as two measures of social and organisational justice perceptions. Once preliminary analyses were carried out to ensure the psychometric properties of the measuring instruments and explore the data set, two key statistical procedures were used to answer the research questions, namely a cluster analysis and a Chi Squared Automatic Interaction Detection or CHAID analysis. Results of these analyses provided some evidence to argue that justice perceptions in different contexts, while not strongly related, cannot be seen in isolation from another, and that a more integrative or reciprocal approach to understanding different justice perceptions needs to be adopted. Further, the results of the cluster analysis demonstrated that a range of key justice concerns differentiated groups from another, including collective versus individual concerns, personal versus impersonal events, as well as concerns related to the different types of relationships that exist. Finally, the CHAID analysis provided some indication of which demographic variables were the best determinants of social and organisational justice perceptions, and the ways in which demographic variables interacted with one another in relation to peoples’ experiences of justice.
10

Using Gentile's Reframing Diversity Model In Public Organizations: FDIC As An Illustration

Sherrer, Brenda Joyce 22 February 2006 (has links)
This dissertation proposes that Dr. Mary C. Gentilel's (1998) descriptive Reframing Diversity model provides for the development of a public sector diversity program. The Reframing Diversity model does not suggest that diversity programs conform to a "one-size-fits all" design. The dissertation applied the lenses (motivation, mindset, method, and measure) of Gentile's Reframing Diversity model to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) diversity program. The lenses of Gentile's model offer questions that are straightforward, easy to understand, and organizationally specific. Additionally, the project utilized the generally accepted approach for qualitative inquiry supported by Rubin and Rubin (1995) to develop an interview protocol for selected FDIC employees. The most salient characteristic of Gentile's model, the lenses, apply to any program regardless of the target audience. The lenses of Gentile's model are the architecture upon which a public sector organization could build a successful diversity program. The model's descriptive nature allows public organizations to develop diversity programs that are voluntary in nature; inclusive of its total employee population; and incorporated into its day-to-day activities. / Ph. D.

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