• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 6
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Overeducation in higher education: a case study of early childhood education in The Ohio State University

Lee, Sophia Te-Yu 14 September 2006 (has links)
No description available.
2

Essays on the economics of higher education

Denning, Jeffrey Todd 04 September 2015 (has links)
This dissertation contains three chapters that examine the effect of price in higher education. The first chapter considers the effect of community college tuition on college enrollment using a natural experiment in Texas where discounts for community college tuition were expanded over time and across geography. Additionally, the long-term effects of community college are examined including transfer to universities and graduation with a bachelor's degree. This chapter uses Texas administrative data from 1994-2012 on the universe of high school graduates and their college enrollment and graduation. For high school graduates, community college enrollment in the first year after high school increased by 7.1 percentage points for a \$1,000 decrease in tuition. Lower tuition also increased transfer from community colleges to universities. There is also marginally statistically significant evidence that attending a community college increased the probability of earning a bachelors degree within eight years of high school graduation by 23 percentage points. The second chapter examines whether students respond to immediate financial incentives when choosing their college major. From 2006-07 to 2010-11, low-income students in technical or foreign language majors could receive up to \$8,000 in Federal Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants. Since income-eligibility was determined using a strict threshold, this chapter determines the causal impact of the grant on student major with a regression discontinuity design. Using administrative data from public universities in Texas, it is estimated that income-eligible students were 3.2 percentage points more likely than their ineligible peers to major in targeted fields. Brigham Young University had a larger impact of 10.1 percentage points. The third chapter considers the effect of financial aid arising from students being declared financially independent on educational outcomes including reenrollment, credits attempted, and graduation. Students who are 24 at the end of the calender year cannot be declared dependent while students who are 23 at the end of the year can be. This sharp change in eligibility is leveraged to compare dependent students to independent students in a regression discontinuity framework. The analysis uses administrative data from from all public universities and colleges in Texas from 2003-04 to 2013-14. Financial independence is associated with modest changes in educational outcomes. / text
3

Three Essays in Economics of Education

Duhaut, Alice 14 September 2016 (has links)
My dissertation focuses on economics of higher education. Specifically, I study how scientists’ social network gives indications on their later career (Chapter 1), the universities’ research performance (Chapter2), and the overall production of research outputs (Chapter3). Building on the current surge of social network analysis, all the papers are built upon networks of co-authors. This thesis contributes to the study of social networks. It documents the prevalence of research collaborations and how they impact the production of science, making a case for taking this phenomenon into account when designing funding mechanisms. Chapter 1 looks at how a researcher’s professional network influences her career path, and I specifically consider the career of young economists on the American academic market. I exploit an original dataset building from the researchers’ individual vitae and their publication records. I investigate the impact of social network on career path by looking at the correlation between early career network metrics and the quality of the institutional affiliation of the researcher. I find that the number of social ties a researcher has as well as her relative position in the research network matters for explaining career mobility and success, even when controlling for publications. Having more co-authors boost the early career, while a higher quality of publications matters on the long run. In Chapter 2, I look at the impact of inter-university partnerships on the production of research outputs.Using an original data set of scientific publications and universities’ budgets, I analyze the network of research in Spain based on the network of Spanish co- authors. I show how the growth in research productivity of Spanish institutions before the crisis was linked to the increase in universities’ budgets and in inter- university collaborations. The results show that the size of the university is the key factor to understand universities productivity. The network multiplier is significant and positive, indicating that collaboration has a positive effect. Finally, in the context of the current crisis, I am able to identify the universities that are the least productive, taking into account their own characteristics and the indirect effects of the collaborations. This analysis has clear policy implications,as the least productive universities could be targeted to minimize the impact of further budgets cuts.Finally, Chapter 3 focuses on the link between the composition of the scientists’ workforce and the amount of research produced. Using Chapter 2’s dataset enriched by a list of the applicants to the two most prestigious postdoctoral grants in Spain, I am able to identify the young researchers in the co-authorship network. I study the link between the number of young researchers and the total research output. All three chapters show how important collaborations are in the production of science. The first chapter shows how some network metrics correlate with career outcomes, giving indication on how much to engage in collaborative work. The second paper shows how network analysis can be used to produce performance rankings of universities taking into account the partnerships. Finally, the third chapter makes a case for the importance of policies targeting young scientists. Further research can be done to understand the link between competition for students and resources and the co-authorship network, or the endogenous process of career changes and changes in the network. / Doctorat en Sciences économiques et de gestion / info:eu-repo/semantics/nonPublished
4

Intertemporal Choice and Enrollment: Exploring the Influence of Latency on Enrollment Yield within the Recruitment Funnel

Guzman, Gregory A. January 2014 (has links)
No description available.
5

Attitudes and Perceptions of Independent Undergraduate Students Towards Student Debt

Gordon, Seth E. 13 September 2013 (has links)
No description available.
6

The effect of the research component of the South African higher education subsidy formula on knowledge production: 2001 - 2006

Madue, Stephens Mpedi 06 1900 (has links)
Government policies on subsidising higher education institutions may have a direct impact on the behaviour of researchers and managers respectively. Therefore, this thesis looks for clues on how higher education institutions respond to the government funding policies, with special reference to the New Funding Framework (NFF) introduced in South Africa in 2001. The funding framework specified that research funding would be determined only on the basis of research output. The NFF puts emphasis on the number of publications produced by higher education institutions per annum to determine their subsidy amounts. Governments use quantitative formulas to allocate research funds to higher education institutions based on their production of output. The current South African funding framework is arguably consistent with some international suggestions of the role that government funding can play in the implementation of national higher policies. This thesis uses higher education research output as a measure of knowledge production. As such, the thesis was set out to determine the effects that the research subsidy component of the NFF might have had on South African public higher education institutions‟ knowledge production between 2001 and 2006. The thesis argues that the subsidy component of the NFF has had positive effects on the knowledge production of South African public higher education institutions (HEIs). An empirical analysis of the output trends of South African HEIs for the period under review has shown a steady increase, more especially from 2003. The thesis attributes the new trend in higher education research output to the successful implementation of the NFF. It is thus concluded that considering the output trends of the period under review, the implementation of the NFF is yielding positive effects towards achieving its intended goal of increasing research output of South African public HEIs. / Public Administration / D. Admin. (Public Administration)
7

The effect of the research component of the South African higher education subsidy formula on knowledge production: 2001 - 2006

Madue, Stephens Mpedi 06 1900 (has links)
Government policies on subsidising higher education institutions may have a direct impact on the behaviour of researchers and managers respectively. Therefore, this thesis looks for clues on how higher education institutions respond to the government funding policies, with special reference to the New Funding Framework (NFF) introduced in South Africa in 2001. The funding framework specified that research funding would be determined only on the basis of research output. The NFF puts emphasis on the number of publications produced by higher education institutions per annum to determine their subsidy amounts. Governments use quantitative formulas to allocate research funds to higher education institutions based on their production of output. The current South African funding framework is arguably consistent with some international suggestions of the role that government funding can play in the implementation of national higher policies. This thesis uses higher education research output as a measure of knowledge production. As such, the thesis was set out to determine the effects that the research subsidy component of the NFF might have had on South African public higher education institutions‟ knowledge production between 2001 and 2006. The thesis argues that the subsidy component of the NFF has had positive effects on the knowledge production of South African public higher education institutions (HEIs). An empirical analysis of the output trends of South African HEIs for the period under review has shown a steady increase, more especially from 2003. The thesis attributes the new trend in higher education research output to the successful implementation of the NFF. It is thus concluded that considering the output trends of the period under review, the implementation of the NFF is yielding positive effects towards achieving its intended goal of increasing research output of South African public HEIs. / Public Administration and Management / D. Admin. (Public Administration)

Page generated in 0.117 seconds