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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Parental differential treatment, the intepretations adolescents attribute to it, and how it affects their adjustment in two family contexts

Mascha, Katerina January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
2

Perceived interviewer characteristics, personality, justice and suitability in selection interview

Marzuki, Najib Ahmad January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
3

Legitimate expectations in administrative decision-making : a comparative study of English, French and EC law

Schoenberg, Soeren J. January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
4

On the justification of democracy

Stanczyk, Lucas January 2005 (has links)
No description available.
5

On the justification of democracy

Stanczyk, Lucas January 2005 (has links)
What is democracy and what makes it just or fair? The orthodox answer to both questions holds that democracy is reducible to the idea and ideal of procedural equality. On this view, democracy is a set of institutions that provides citizens with equal procedural opportunities to influence political decisions, and this fact about democracy is what makes it just or fair. / The position defended in this essay holds that the orthodox answer of proceduralism is mistaken. The conceptual ideal that animates proceduralism---the notion of an equal distribution of political power---is theoretically impossible, and the closest proxy---a decision-making process that terminates in simple majority rule---cannot be justified as fair in virtue of the way that it distributes power. / In order to be fair, democratic institutions must satisfy both process- and outcome-oriented criteria of fairness. Fairness overall requires both just outcomes and a fair political process that promotes everyone's interests in public recognition, agency, and moral membership in a community of equals. Procedural equality is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition of fairness overall. / A proceduralist account of the fairness of democratic institutions is most appealing in the context of conscientious disagreement about questions of substantive justice. Its implicit promise in that context is to provide a neutral and impartial way to solve otherwise intractable moral disputes. In this context, too, the promise of proceduralism is illusory. Here, however, proceduralism is not alone in its failure; for no account of democratic institutions can render them fair in the presence of conscientious moral disagreement.
6

Studies on equity with the world a new application of equity theory /

Austin, William George, January 1974 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1974. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
7

Fairness im Klimaschutz : Ansatzpunkte und Probleme einer internationalen Lastenverteilung zwischen Industrie- und Entwicklungsländern

Thielmann, Sascha January 2005 (has links)
Zugl.: Mainz, Univ., Diss.
8

Billike arbeidspraktyk vir opvoeders in Suid-Afrikaanse openbare skole / deur Louis Jacobus van Staden

Van Staden, Louis Jacobus January 2006 (has links)
Unfair labour practice formed part of South Africa's history throughout the years. There was not enough legislation to protect all races against unfair labour practice. The dramatic political, governmental and social changes over the last decade ensured that South Africa put new legislation in place to ensure fair labour practice for all races in South Africa. This legislation is also implemented in the South Africa education system to ensure fairness. The Employment of Educators Act and the South African Schools Act devised legislation to protects the rights of both the learner and the educator in the education system of South-Africa. The aim of this research was to determine whether there is sufficient legislation to protect the rights of the educator, in which manner unfair labour practice exists against educators, to what extent unfair labour practice influences motivation and productivity of educators and what the perceptions of educators are regarding unfair practice by the department. This has been done according to a literature study, as well as an analysis of legislation relevant to the educator, and any other legislation pertaining to the regulation of labour practice in South Africa. The essence of fair labour practice is discussed and validated by certain court cases which exposed unfair labour practice in South Africa. These court cases are analysed and discussed to explain the relevant aspects of the essence. Interviews were conducted with educators, and questionnaires were distributed to selected schools, then analysed to obtain their views on availability of relevant legislation, knowledge and perceptions on legislation, viewpoint on injustice, viewpoint of educator's motivation and productivity and possible solutions to limit injustice. It was then possible to compile certain recommendations and conclusions out of the information derived from the questionnaires and interviews. The general impression of the results was that there is a negative attitude from educators towards the department. Educators feel that the Department of Education does not protect them adequately. These educators belief that they are treated unfairly by the department. The majority of educators feel that the department does not have enough knowledge of the relevant legislation and this contributes to unfair action against educators. This unfair labour practice does influence the motivation and productivity of educators in the public schools of South Africa. A large number of educators feel that they are treated unfairly regarding the workload and the distribution of tasks in the schools. The unmanageable large classes and restriction of powers of the educator regarding discipline lead to negativity and a loss of productivity. When the Department of Education starts paying attention to the complaints by educators and liaise with schools timeously, it would ensure a fairer education system and educators would be more motivated and thus more productive. / Thesis (M.Ed.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2006.
9

Billike arbeidspraktyk vir opvoeders in Suid-Afrikaanse openbare skole / deur Louis Jacobus van Staden

Van Staden, Louis Jacobus January 2006 (has links)
Unfair labour practice formed part of South Africa's history throughout the years. There was not enough legislation to protect all races against unfair labour practice. The dramatic political, governmental and social changes over the last decade ensured that South Africa put new legislation in place to ensure fair labour practice for all races in South Africa. This legislation is also implemented in the South Africa education system to ensure fairness. The Employment of Educators Act and the South African Schools Act devised legislation to protects the rights of both the learner and the educator in the education system of South-Africa. The aim of this research was to determine whether there is sufficient legislation to protect the rights of the educator, in which manner unfair labour practice exists against educators, to what extent unfair labour practice influences motivation and productivity of educators and what the perceptions of educators are regarding unfair practice by the department. This has been done according to a literature study, as well as an analysis of legislation relevant to the educator, and any other legislation pertaining to the regulation of labour practice in South Africa. The essence of fair labour practice is discussed and validated by certain court cases which exposed unfair labour practice in South Africa. These court cases are analysed and discussed to explain the relevant aspects of the essence. Interviews were conducted with educators, and questionnaires were distributed to selected schools, then analysed to obtain their views on availability of relevant legislation, knowledge and perceptions on legislation, viewpoint on injustice, viewpoint of educator's motivation and productivity and possible solutions to limit injustice. It was then possible to compile certain recommendations and conclusions out of the information derived from the questionnaires and interviews. The general impression of the results was that there is a negative attitude from educators towards the department. Educators feel that the Department of Education does not protect them adequately. These educators belief that they are treated unfairly by the department. The majority of educators feel that the department does not have enough knowledge of the relevant legislation and this contributes to unfair action against educators. This unfair labour practice does influence the motivation and productivity of educators in the public schools of South Africa. A large number of educators feel that they are treated unfairly regarding the workload and the distribution of tasks in the schools. The unmanageable large classes and restriction of powers of the educator regarding discipline lead to negativity and a loss of productivity. When the Department of Education starts paying attention to the complaints by educators and liaise with schools timeously, it would ensure a fairer education system and educators would be more motivated and thus more productive. / Thesis (M.Ed.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2006.
10

Perceptions and experiences of fairness amongst Muslim post-secondary students in Canada

2013 June 1900 (has links)
The purpose of this study is to examine perceptions and experiences of fairness amongst Muslim post-secondary students in order to gain insights for internationalization policy making in post-secondary education. This study is a mixed methods study. A triangulation design was employed to collect data. The participants, 189 Muslim students, were reached via student organizations, national and local Muslim organizations, and Muslim student groups organized on Facebook. Following use of these initial contact points, snowball sampling was also utilized. The quantitative and qualitative data were gathered simultaneously by using a web survey. The survey included 12 open-ended and 19 closed questions. The quantitative data were analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistical analysis techniques. The qualitative data were analyzed by employing thematic analysis. Selected results from the study are as follows: When interpolated from perceptions of Muslim students, their collective definition of fairness is: using one standard for everybody in the same context. For Muslim students, their university is the most fair setting, followed by Canada, and the country that Muslim students culturally identified with. The World is perceived as the most unfair setting for responding Muslims. Except the country Muslim students culturally identified with, all settings are perceived to be more fair for non-Muslims than for Muslims. The majority of Muslim students reported that they had encountered, observed, or experienced unfairness at least once in their university during the previous academic year and that they had been impacted by that unfairness. The most commonly reported type of unfairness was interactional unfairness, followed by distributive unfairness. The most frequently reported violated rules causing to interactional unfairness were those related to respect, propriety, and consistency. For distributive unfairness the most frequently reported violated rules were those associated with equity, equality, and need. Participants generally blame violators for unfairness; criticizing them for being biased, ignorant, and intolerant to differences. More than 90 percent of participants reported that they experienced negative feelings because of the unfairness they had experienced. Participants’ most commonly reported reactions to the unfairness involved passive behaviours, followed by assertive behaviours. Gender, age, the amount of time Muslim students spent in Canada, legal status, the country where Muslim students had spent the majority of their life, nationality, the country Muslim students culturally identified with, and religious commitment level indicated difference in some dependent variables which reflect the participants’ fairness perceptions or experiences.

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