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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Gelatinization characteristics of rice flour and isolated starch in the absence and presence of solutes

Chungcharoen, Anadi. January 1983 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1983. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 134-142).
2

Determination of the degree of gelatinization of starch

Shetty, Raviprasad M January 2010 (has links)
Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
3

Novel valine-based organogelators and their gelation behaviors.

January 2005 (has links)
Cheng Chin-Ho. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 93-100). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Table of content --- p.ii / Acknowledgements --- p.ix / Abstract (English) --- p.x / Abstract (Chinese) --- p.xi / Abbreviations --- p.xii / Chapter Chapter 1 - --- Introduction / Chapter 1-1 --- Definition of gels --- p.1 / Chapter 1-2 --- Organogels and organogelators --- p.3 / Chapter 1-3 --- Characterization of organogels and organogelators --- p.5 / Chapter 1-4 --- Classes of organogelators --- p.10 / Chapter 1-5 --- Applications --- p.17 / Chapter 1-6 --- Origin of research project --- p.20 / Chapter Chapter 2 - --- Synthesis and Characterization / Chapter 2-1 --- Structural modification of the Lead compound --- p.22 / Chapter 2-2 --- Retrosynthetic analysis --- p.23 / Chapter 2-3 --- Synthesis --- p.26 / Chapter 2-4 --- Characterization of the target compounds --- p.32 / Chapter 2-4-1 --- NMR spectrometry --- p.32 / Chapter 2-4-2 --- Mass spectrometry --- p.37 / Chapter 2-4-3 --- Elemental analysis --- p.38 / Chapter 2-4-4 --- Melting point determination --- p.39 / Chapter 2-4-5 --- Optical polarimetry --- p.40 / Chapter Chapter 3 - --- Investigation of Gelation Behaviors / Chapter 3-1 --- Gelation behaviors of bis-(urea valine) ethyl esters --- p.41 / Chapter 3-2 --- Gelation behaviors of bis-(urea valine) benzyl esters --- p.43 / Chapter 3-3 --- Effect of lengths of hydrocarbon chains on gelation behaviors --- p.46 / Chapter 3-4 --- Effect of ester protecting group on gelation behaviors --- p.47 / Chapter 3-5 --- Conclusions --- p.48 / Chapter Chapter 4 - --- Elucidation of Gelation Mechanisms / Chapter 4-1 --- FT-IR Spectroscopy --- p.49 / Chapter 4-2 --- Thermotropic behavior --- p.52 / Chapter 4-3 --- Morphological behavior --- p.54 / Chapter 4-4 --- Chiroptical behavior --- p.57 / Chapter 4-5 --- Conclusions --- p.58 / Chapter Chapter 5 - --- Summary --- p.59 / Chapter Chapter 6 - --- Experimental --- p.61 / References --- p.93 / Appendix NMR spectra / 1H NMR of (Boc-NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 23 --- p.101 / 13C NMR of(Boc-NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 23 --- p.102 / HNMR of (H2N-V)2-Ar-CO2Et 26 --- p.103 / 13C NMR of(H2N-V)2-Ar-CO2Et 26 --- p.104 / "1H NMR of 3,5-Di(tert-butylcarbonylamino)benzoic acid 36" --- p.105 / "13C NMR of 3,5-Di(tert-butylcarbonylamino)benzoic acid 36" --- p.106 / "1H NMR of Benzyl 3,5-di(tert-butylcarbonylamino)benzoate 37" --- p.107 / "13C NMR of Benzyl 3,5-di(tert-butylcarbonylamino)benzoate 37" --- p.108 / "1H NMR of Benzyl 3,5-diaminobenzoate 38" --- p.109 / "13C NMR of Benzyl 3,5-diaminobenzoate 38" --- p.110 / 1H NMR of(Boc-NH-V)2-Ar-CO2Bn 29 --- p.111 / 13C NMR of(Boc-NH-V)2-Ar-CO2Bn 29 --- p.112 / 1H NMR of (H2N-V)2-Ar-CO2Bn 30 --- p.113 / 13C NMR of (H2N-V)2-Ar-CO2Bn 30 --- p.114 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl butylcarbamate 27a --- p.115 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl butylcarbamate 27a --- p.116 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl pentylcarbamate 27b --- p.117 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl pentylcarbamate 27b --- p.118 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyj hexylcarbamate 27c --- p.119 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl hexylcarbamate 27c --- p.120 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl heptylcarbamate 27d --- p.121 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl heptylcarbamate 27d --- p.122 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl decylcarbamate 27e --- p.123 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl decylcarbamate 27e --- p.124 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl undecylcarbamate 27f --- p.125 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl undecylcarbamate 27f --- p.126 / NMR of O-Succinimidyl tridecylcarbamate 27g --- p.127 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl tridecylcarbamate 27g --- p.128 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl hexadecylcarbamate 27h --- p.129 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl hexadecylcarbamate 27h --- p.130 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl nonadecylcarbamate 27i --- p.131 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl nonadecylcarbamate 27i --- p.132 / 1H NMR of O-Succinimidyl heneicosylcarbamate 27j --- p.133 / 13C NMR of O-Succinimidyl heneicosylcarbamate 27j --- p.134 / 1H NMR of (n-C4H9-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-CO2Et 24a --- p.135 / 13C NMR of (n-C4H9-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-CO2Et 24a --- p.136 / 1H NMR of (n-C5H11-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24b --- p.137 / 13C NMR of (N-C5H11-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24b --- p.138 / HNMR 0f(N-C6H13-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et24c --- p.139 / 13C NMR of (n-C6H13-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24c --- p.140 / HNMR of (n-C7H 15-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24d --- p.141 / 13C NMR of (n-C7H15-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24d --- p.142 / 1H NMR of (n-C10H21-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-G02Et 24e --- p.143 / "13C NMR of(n-C10H21,-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-CO2Et 24e" --- p.144 / HNMR of (n-C11 H23-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24f --- p.145 / 13C NMR 0f (n-C23H23-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24f --- p.146 / HNMR of (n-Cl3H27-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24g --- p.147 / 13C NMR of (n-C13H27-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24g --- p.148 / 1H NMR of (n-C16H33-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24h --- p.149 / 13C NMR of (n-C16H33-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24h --- p.150 / 1H NMR of (n-C19H39-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24i --- p.151 / 13C NMR of (n-C19H39-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24i --- p.152 / 1H NMR of (n-C21 H43-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24j --- p.153 / 13C NMR of (^-C2iH43-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Et 24j --- p.154 / HNIVIR of (n-C4H9-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25a --- p.155 / 13C NMR of (n-C4H9-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25a --- p.156 / 1H NMR of(n-C5H11-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25b --- p.157 / 13C NMR of (n-C5H11-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25b --- p.158 / 1H NMR of(n--C6H13-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25c --- p.159 / 13C NMR of OC6Hl3-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25c --- p.160 / 1H NMR of(n-C7H15-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25d --- p.161 / 13C NMR of(n- C7H15-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25cl --- p.162 / 1H NMR of(n--C10H21-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25e --- p.163 / 13C NMR of (n-C10H21NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25e --- p.164 / HNMR of(n-C11H23-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25f --- p.165 / 13C NMR of(n-C11H23-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25f --- p.166 / 1H NMR of(n-Cl3H27-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25g --- p.167 / 13C NMR of (n-C13H27-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25g --- p.168 / 1H NMR of (n-Cl6H33-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25h --- p.169 / 13C NMR of (n-C16H33-NHCONH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25h --- p.170 / 1H NMR of (n-C19H39-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25i --- p.171 / 13C NMR of (n-Cl9H39-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25i --- p.172 / 1H NMR of (n-C21H43-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25j --- p.173 / 13C NMR of (n-C2lH43-NHC0NH-V)2-Ar-C02Bn 25j --- p.174 / "1H NMR of 1,3-didodecylurea 39" --- p.175 / "13C NMR of 1,3-didodecylurea 39" --- p.176 / "1H NMR of Ethyl 3,5-diaminobenzoate 32" --- p.177 / "13C NMR of Ethyl 3,5-diaminobenzoate 32" --- p.178
4

Chemical and Biochemical Factors That Influence the Gelation of Soybean Protein and the Yield of Tofu

Blazek, Vladimir January 2008 (has links)
Doctor of Philosophy(PhD) / Soybeans contain around 40% of high quality protein and 20 % of oil. Soy protein has long been used as ingredients for its emulsification and texturizing properties in a variety of foods, soymilk and tofu being the most popular. Soymilk is essentially a water extract of soybeans and there are many variations on the basic soymilk processing steps. Tofu, or bean curd, is made by coagulating soy milk, and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. This thesis was mainly devoted to thermal denaturation and coagulation of soy proteins and targeted several selected important factors as they relate to the functional properties. The effects of different chemical coagulants as well as proteases on yield and quality of tofu from soybeans were studied. Eight tested chemical coagulants were able to coagulate the soymilk and the results showed that the concentration of soymilk and type of coagulant had a great influence on the properties of the tofu gel. The results also confirmed that the use of a suitable concentration of the quick-acting coagulants is more critical than that of the slow-acting coagulants in tofu making. In general, the extent of soymilk gelation is not determined by a single characteristic but rather results from a combination of factors. The gelation ability of various most common commercially available proteases to coagulate non-defatted soymilk was surveyed and the thermal stabilities of selected protease systems were compared. The difference in the temperature where the enzyme shows its highest activity seemed to be the most significant indicator when choosing a suitable enzyme for a certain industrial application. The three most effective and versatile soymilk coagulants were identified. The presence of small amounts of ficin in the system increased the protein recovery when calcium chloride was used as a coagulant. The most commonly used techniques of analysis of degree of hydrolysis (TNBS, OPA and pH-stat) of soy protein were compared. It was concluded that the pH-stat technique was useful for evaluating the progress of an enzyme-catalyzed protein hydrolysis process on an industrial scale while the OPA method seemed to be the most suitable method to be used for determining DH during the proteolysis of soymilk in laboratory conditions. The roles of soybean proteins, protein fractions and subunits to differences in gelling properties of different soybean varieties were examined. The variability and the interrelationship between soybean seed traits were established and the seed characteristics related to soymilk yield and tofu quality were identified. The results suggested that it is useful to predict the quality of tofu from a combination of characteristics of the soybean seed. It was concluded that large differences exist in soybean seed characteristics and their contributions towards the properties of the final product and implications were made towards the relative importance of individual soybean seed traits to the functional and textural properties of soy products. The SDS gel capillary electrophoresis was applied to characterize soybean storage proteins. The lab-on-a-chip technology was compared with capillary electrophoresis and these two methods were used to quantify the relative amount of 7S and 11S fractions in various soybean cultivars. It was concluded that both lab-on-a-chip instrument and a traditional CGE were adequate for analysis of soy-based products. Both systems were able to reliably quantify the relative amount of protein fractions in samples and thus demonstrate their different genetic origin. The great advantage of the lab-on-a-chip technology is its time-efficiency while the traditional CGE is a preferred instrument for method development. The usefulness of the chemometrical analysis of electrophoretic profiles as a method for objective evaluation, data reduction and interpretation was shown. The possibility of improvement of the protein extraction from soybeans in order to provide a basis for the optimization of soymilk production was studied. The enzyme-assisted extraction using the hydrolytic enzyme treatment to disrupt the soybean cell wall components was expected to improve the protein extraction yield. The results confirmed that the right selection of operational variables led to an increased yield of soymilk as well as its protein concentration. It was also shown that the addition of selected enzyme preparations into the soymilk process design resulted in an increased extraction yield of proteins from seeds into soymilk. The protein quality did not deteriorate during the enzyme-assisted extraction process and a small amount of microbial transglutaminase added together with a coagulant produced tofu with a significantly increased yield while maintaing satisfactory textural properties.
5

Microrheological characterisation of Fmoc derivative hydrogels

Aufderhorst-Roberts, Anders January 2013 (has links)
No description available.
6

Chemical and Biochemical Factors That Influence the Gelation of Soybean Protein and the Yield of Tofu

Blazek, Vladimir January 2008 (has links)
Doctor of Philosophy(PhD) / Soybeans contain around 40% of high quality protein and 20 % of oil. Soy protein has long been used as ingredients for its emulsification and texturizing properties in a variety of foods, soymilk and tofu being the most popular. Soymilk is essentially a water extract of soybeans and there are many variations on the basic soymilk processing steps. Tofu, or bean curd, is made by coagulating soy milk, and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. This thesis was mainly devoted to thermal denaturation and coagulation of soy proteins and targeted several selected important factors as they relate to the functional properties. The effects of different chemical coagulants as well as proteases on yield and quality of tofu from soybeans were studied. Eight tested chemical coagulants were able to coagulate the soymilk and the results showed that the concentration of soymilk and type of coagulant had a great influence on the properties of the tofu gel. The results also confirmed that the use of a suitable concentration of the quick-acting coagulants is more critical than that of the slow-acting coagulants in tofu making. In general, the extent of soymilk gelation is not determined by a single characteristic but rather results from a combination of factors. The gelation ability of various most common commercially available proteases to coagulate non-defatted soymilk was surveyed and the thermal stabilities of selected protease systems were compared. The difference in the temperature where the enzyme shows its highest activity seemed to be the most significant indicator when choosing a suitable enzyme for a certain industrial application. The three most effective and versatile soymilk coagulants were identified. The presence of small amounts of ficin in the system increased the protein recovery when calcium chloride was used as a coagulant. The most commonly used techniques of analysis of degree of hydrolysis (TNBS, OPA and pH-stat) of soy protein were compared. It was concluded that the pH-stat technique was useful for evaluating the progress of an enzyme-catalyzed protein hydrolysis process on an industrial scale while the OPA method seemed to be the most suitable method to be used for determining DH during the proteolysis of soymilk in laboratory conditions. The roles of soybean proteins, protein fractions and subunits to differences in gelling properties of different soybean varieties were examined. The variability and the interrelationship between soybean seed traits were established and the seed characteristics related to soymilk yield and tofu quality were identified. The results suggested that it is useful to predict the quality of tofu from a combination of characteristics of the soybean seed. It was concluded that large differences exist in soybean seed characteristics and their contributions towards the properties of the final product and implications were made towards the relative importance of individual soybean seed traits to the functional and textural properties of soy products. The SDS gel capillary electrophoresis was applied to characterize soybean storage proteins. The lab-on-a-chip technology was compared with capillary electrophoresis and these two methods were used to quantify the relative amount of 7S and 11S fractions in various soybean cultivars. It was concluded that both lab-on-a-chip instrument and a traditional CGE were adequate for analysis of soy-based products. Both systems were able to reliably quantify the relative amount of protein fractions in samples and thus demonstrate their different genetic origin. The great advantage of the lab-on-a-chip technology is its time-efficiency while the traditional CGE is a preferred instrument for method development. The usefulness of the chemometrical analysis of electrophoretic profiles as a method for objective evaluation, data reduction and interpretation was shown. The possibility of improvement of the protein extraction from soybeans in order to provide a basis for the optimization of soymilk production was studied. The enzyme-assisted extraction using the hydrolytic enzyme treatment to disrupt the soybean cell wall components was expected to improve the protein extraction yield. The results confirmed that the right selection of operational variables led to an increased yield of soymilk as well as its protein concentration. It was also shown that the addition of selected enzyme preparations into the soymilk process design resulted in an increased extraction yield of proteins from seeds into soymilk. The protein quality did not deteriorate during the enzyme-assisted extraction process and a small amount of microbial transglutaminase added together with a coagulant produced tofu with a significantly increased yield while maintaing satisfactory textural properties.
7

Gelation of previously cooked Jonah crab (Cancer borealis) minced meat in new food product development /

Baxter, Shari R., January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.) in Food and Nutrition Sciences--University of Maine, 2007. / Includes vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 130-150).
8

In-situ monitoring of the mechanical properties during the photopolymerization of acrylate resins using particle tracking microrheology

Slopek, Ryan Patrick. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2008. / Committee Chair: Dr. Victor Breedveld; Committee Member: Dr. Clifford Henderson; Committee Member: Dr. David Rosen; Committee Member: Dr. Peter Ludovice; Committee Member: Dr. Sai Kumar.
9

Gelation of Previously Cooked Jonah Crab (Cancer borealis) Minced Meat in New Food Product Development

Baxter, Shari R. January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
10

Gelation Time and Rheological Property of Gelatin Gels Prepared with a Phosphate-buffered Saline-ethanol Solution

Jiang, Junyuan 03 June 2015 (has links)
No description available.

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