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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Ketu identities Islam, gender, and French colonialism in West Africa, 1850s--1960s (Benin).

Semley, Lorelle Denise. Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Northwestern University, 2002. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 63-11, Section: A, page: 4051. Adviser: John Hunwick.
2

Evoking humanity: Reflections on the importance of university museums and collections

Gilbert, Alan D. Unknown Date (has links) (PDF)
In this paper, Professor Alan Gilbert, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Manchester, welcomes UMAC delegates and explains why he feels that museums in general - and university museums in particular - are singularly important.
3

The social construction of the South African male identity

Augustine, Cilicia Senta 29 October 2008 (has links)
M.A. This research study was undertaken from a social constructionist perspective. It aims to explore the impact of the emergence of female equality on the South African Male identity. Specifically the researcher tried to investigate how men from different racial and cultural groups cope with changes brought about by the new democracy and gender equality. The first part of the dissertation consists of a review of the literature on the shift from modernism to postmodernism. It includes postmodernist ideas on language, meaning, narrative and the social construction of gender as well as identity. The literature study further provides an overview of the different feminisms. Male identity is then reviewed highlighting the different factors that contribute to its formation, maintenance, as well as its expression in the South African context. In line with the researcher’s epistemology, the methodology was qualitative in nature and semi-structured interviews were used. The narratives of the participants were subjected to a thematic analysis. The significant themes that emerged from the analysis are presented in the results chapter. It is evident from the narratives of the research participants that some males are experiencing difficulty in trying to adapt to the emerging female conscience. It has also been noted that although men are now taking on a greater childcaring role and placing more emphasis on relationships such change seems to be occurring on a very small scale. The slow change in gender roles can be attributed to the normative structure of the patriarchal cultures in South Africa that make role change difficult. The results are thus discussed in light of the literature study as well as the South African context. Finally a conclusion is offered together with the reflections of the researcher and a discussion of the limitations of the study. Lastly recommendations are made in the hope that it would help psychologists, sociologists and lawmakers’ work towards a better understanding of men’s position in society and their fears. It is only through understanding both sides that one can facilitate better gender relationships. Ms. Brenda Radebe
4

Understanding the cognitive and affective underpinnings of whistleblowing

Buhrmester, Michael Duane 2013 (has links)
Enron, Pfizer, UBS, Halliburton: In recent years, organizational wrongdoing has cost taxpayers and stakeholders billions of dollars. Whistleblowers, organizational insiders who witness and report wrongdoing with the intent of effecting an organizational response, play a major role as combatants to such corruption. What motivates whistleblowers versus silent witnesses of wrongdoing? And what cognitive and emotional patterns underlie their actions? Here I construe whistleblowing as a personally costly but pro-organizational action (Miceli, Near, & Dworkin, 2008). As such, whistleblowing represents a novel type of extreme pro-group behavior that identity fusion theory seeks to explain (Swann, Jetten, Gomez, Whitehouse, & Bastian, 2012). The identity fusion approach posits that some people experience a visceral feeling of "oneness" with a group, a feeling that motivates a range of extreme pro-group actions. Across four preliminary studies, I first establish that fusion with one's organization (i.e., work or university) parallels fusion with other groups (e.g., country, political party). In addition, Preliminary Study 4 shows that fusion and whistleblowing are associated in retrospective accounts of workplace behavior. Given this initial support, a controlled lab experiment was conducted to address two major questions. First, to what extent is identity fusion with one's university associated with initial and formal whistleblowing behaviors? Second, in what ways, if any, do strongly vs. weakly fused individuals' cognitive and emotional experiences differ in response to witnessing organizational wrongdoing? As hypothesized, fusion with one's university predicted spontaneous reporting of an in-group transgressor. Strongly fused students' actions were associated with several cognitive and emotional factors, and cross-method evidence indicated that active negative emotions (e.g., anger) coupled with a heightened sense of personal responsibility drove strongly fused persons to spontaneously blow the whistle. Furthermore, strongly fused students were also especially likely to formally (as compared to spontaneously) report the transgressor. Evidence from participants' debriefing responses suggested that while weakly fused students diffused formal reporting responsibility to others, strongly fused students felt personally responsible to follow-through with a formal report. Overall, these results suggest that identity fusion is a promising perspective for understanding motives underlying personally costly pro-group behaviors. text
5

Swerve : a memoir of identity in three American high schools

Vliet, Sasha Marie 2011 (has links)
This dissertation is an ethnographic study of nine different students in three American public high schools, their experimentation with alcohol and drugs, and their respective processes of identity formation. While much work has done to establish the relevant and various paths towards finding identity in the American adolescent and in the fields of American education, public schooling, and youth culture, this work attempts to offer a specific presentation of what the path towards finding identity looks like in the American classroom for students who also experiment with alcohol and drugs. The nine students are presented in this work via three different category types of identity formations: Creativity Through Chemical, Charisma Through Chemical, and Challenge Through Chemical. The presentation of the students is ethnographic in nature given the various strengths and attributes of the ethnographic approach. The classroom is a valuable location for establishing a unique perspective on adolescent self-expression, a place where students’ projections and the perceptions of others are intertwined. What students experience in the classroom as a group and individually is a meaningful element to their evolving identities. This work establishes the significance of these experiences in conjunction with the students’ experimentation with alcohol and drugs. Adolescence, as a period for young people of identifying with group culture and as an individual while differentiating between right and wrong is a significant developmental phase. This work acknowledges the communities in which these students are engaged, their respective high school communities, the relevant details of each classroom, and explicates the details of their processes of identity formation for these nine students within the context of their classroom cultures. text
6

Standing in the shadow of the moon: a diaristic encounter with identity through my everyday

Tran, Michelle 2009 (has links)
Art and lived experience are the key to my work. Standing in the Shadow of the Moon – A Diaristic Encounter With Identity Through My Everyday is an inquiry into the various possibilities for photography as a diaristic medium that blends the concepts of documentary and tableau photography, whilst exploring my identity. In this mode of expression, my project is an investigation into concepts of self-representation and subjectivity. What does it mean to create an enigmatic series of 'self-portraits' that are focused on those around me, those whom reflect me, but are not me?
7

Standing in the shadow of the moon: a diaristic encounter with identity through my everyday

Tran, Michelle 2009 (has links)
Art and lived experience are the key to my work. Standing in the Shadow of the Moon – A Diaristic Encounter With Identity Through My Everyday is an inquiry into the various possibilities for photography as a diaristic medium that blends the concepts of documentary and tableau photography, whilst exploring my identity. In this mode of expression, my project is an investigation into concepts of self-representation and subjectivity. What does it mean to create an enigmatic series of 'self-portraits' that are focused on those around me, those whom reflect me, but are not me?
8

Identity and career

Gibson, Paul S., paul.gibson@rmit.edu.au 2001
The issue is making sense of identity and career as mutually contouring. I look at that contouring through a conceptual framework which constellates narrative theory, social theory, and existential theory as three related but significantly different ways of understanding human life and human action. That framework constitutes an advance upon thinking about identity and career in Modernist terms, in that each of the constituent theories goes beyond the duality of subjectivity and objectivity to reconceptualise the subject as entangled, inscribed, and involved. Given that conception, we begin to see why the achievement of a coherent identity through career is inherently problematic. To reach that way of seeing, I analyse the narrative accounts of two research partners: accounts of their lives and careers. The goal of the analysis is to demonstrate the illuminative potential of the combined theory that is developed in the first part of the thesis: a potential which is partly realized in the ways that the analysis reveals a mutual contouring that had not been fully recognised by the research partners. Finally, I conclude that career can be fruitfully seen as a nexus of opportunity for the construction and expression of narrative identity, social identity, and existential identity over time.
9

The politics of gender in a time of change : gender discourses, institutions, and identities in contemporary Indonesia

Love, Kaleen E. 2007 (has links)
Thesis (D.Phil.)--University of Oxford, 2008. Supervisor: Dr Peter Carey, Dr Cathie Lloyd. Bibliography: leaves 317-343.
10

Between two worlds consequences of dual-group membership among children

Aumer-Ryan, Katherine Vera 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2008. Vita. Includes bibliographical references.

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